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Technological innovations

 Subject
Subject Source: Library of Congress Subject Headings

Found in 12 Collections and/or Records:

Brooke Hindle conference paper on early American technology (typescript)

 Collection
Accession: 1971
Abstract:

Brooke Hindle (1918-2001) was a prominent historian who wrote extensively on early American science and technology. Hindle was senior resident scholar at the Eleutherian Mills-Hagley Foundation (1969-1970), a member of its advisory committee (1971-1974), and a trustee (1974-1985). This essay, delivered at a conference held at Hagley in 1965, reviews the historiography of early American technology, suggesting various methods of approaching the subject and stressing the "Americanness" of American technology.

Dates: 1965

Cavalcade of America phonograph records

 Collection
Accession: 1968-001-G68
Abstract:

The Cavalcade of America was an anthology drama radio program which aired weekly from 1935 to 1953. The radio show was sponsored by the DuPont Company, a chemical company, which began as a manufacturer of gunpowder in 1802. The DuPont Company created the Cavalcade of America as a promotional tool. The program dramatized historical events focusing on individual stories of heroism, and occasionally presented a musical performance. This collection contains recordings of most of the show's episodes and consists of over 2,900 phonograph albums, approximately 500 sound tape reels, 6 sound cassettes and one scrapbook.

Dates: 1935-1953

Charles M. Cooper papers

 Collection
Accession: 2275
Abstract:

Charles Milton Cooper (1900-1971) was a chemical engineer and an executive at the E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company, a chemical company more commonly referred to as the DuPont company. His papers primarily include notes and photographs produced during his time conducting bubble formation experiments at the DuPont Company’s Belle Plant, in Charleston, West Virginia.

Dates: 1925-1968

Crawford H. Greenewalt personal papers

 Collection
Accession: 2016
Abstract:

Crawford H. Greenewalt (1902-1993) was an executive with the DuPont Company and president of the firm from 1948 to 1962. He had a passion for the natural sciences, and combined his love of ornithology with photography. He was especially known for his high-speed photographs of hummingbirds. His ornithological interests included bird songs, the radiance of hummingbird feathers, and the evolution of shapes and sizes of birds in relation to their flight abilities. Greenewalt's personal papers are primarily focused on his retirement years and his avocational interests. The papers document Greenewalt's political activities in the Republican National Committee and include exchanges with many of the leading political and business figures of the day. Of particular significance are the papers describing Greenewalt's work in photography and ornithology, beginning in 1948. These materials trace his research interests in the hummingbird and bird flight and his trips to places like Brazil, Peru, Venezuela, the Antilles, New Guinea, and the Galapagos Islands in order to observe and photograph birds in their natural habitats. Other files describe Greenewalt's work on the visiting committee at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1965-1987), which evaluated the school's academic programs.

Dates: 1948-1992

C.W. Parker Amusement Company records

 Collection
Accession: 2730
Abstract:

The C.W. Parker Amusement Company produced various amusement devices, such as shooting galleries and ferris wheels, but was best known for its carousels named "Carry-Us-Alls." When the company was founded in 1894 by C.W. Parker (1864-1932) in Abilene, Kansas, it was the only carousel manufacturer not on the east coast. This small collection of records documents the professional life of C.W. Parker, the "Amusement King" and his company. The collection comprised of textual material, including financial records, correspondence with other manufacturing vendors, and publications regarding the company's progress.

Dates: 1890-1955

Eugene Shallcross Ferguson papers

 Collection
Accession: 2249
Abstract:

Eugene S. Ferguson (1916-2004) was one of the founders of the discipline of the history of technology, both through teaching at Iowa State University and the University of Delaware and by working at the Smithsonian Institution and the Hagley Museum. This collection documents the first twenty years of the history of technology as an academic discipline, and networking among its practitioners.

Dates: 1937-2001; Majority of material found within 1960-1995

"Link to the Future" film

 Collection
Accession: 2014-254
Abstract:

International Business Machines Corporation (IBM) became a giant in the field of electronic data processing by the mid-1950s after having achieved great success in the punch-card tabulating machine business in the 1930s. This is a sales film for IBM about the history of information technology.

Dates: 1974

Pew Charitable Trusts digital archive

 Collection
Accession: AVD.2020
Abstract:

The Pew Charitable Trusts are a major philanthropic organization based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Part of the Pew Charitable Trusts records in the Manuscripts and Archives Department, the digital archive consists primarily of eGrant products and Pew publications.

Dates: 1995-2022

RCA Astro-Electronics Division records

 Collection
Accession: 2464-70
Abstract:

The RCA Astro-Electronics Division (AED) led RCA’s research and development efforts in space technology from the beginning of the space race to the acquisition of RCA by GE in 1986. The records consist primarily of the papers of scientists Bert Sheffield, Max Mesner, and Charles Vose documenting RCA’s pioneering research. In addition, the Art Gompper Astro Print Shop collection provides insight into the administrative and promotional side of AED.

Dates: 1910-1993

Robert Olodort archive

 Collection
Accession: 2769
Abstract:

Robert "Bob" Allan Olodort (1946-2019) was an inventor, industrial designer, and entrepreneur. He is best known for his invention of the "Stowaway," a portable, full-size keyboard that folds up to be pocket-size. It was used for Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs) like the Palm Pilot. Olodort invented the first computer label printer, the Smart Label Printer, among many other wireless mobile products. He holds dozens of U.S. and foreign utility and design patents. The Robert Olodort archive documents the industrial design process from both an inventor's and an entrepreneurial standpoint. The collection shows the development of a concept into a final product through product research, notes, correspondence, sketches, mechanical drawings, and prototypes. It provides valuable insight into how proprietary technology can be monetized by patenting and maintaining company relationships through development, licensing, and purchase agreements. The records also document business operations with financial files, board of directors files, and investor files. While none of the record sets are complete, there is a large enough sampling for a researcher to comprehend the complexity of design and business practices.

Dates: 1978-2019

Trundle Engineering Company album

 Collection
Accession: 2020-212
Abstract:

The Trundle Engineering Company was an industrial engineering management consulting company based in Cleveland, Ohio. Clients would hire Trundle Engineering Company to perform studies on their organization or operating methods. One aspect of the business was the design and manufacture of custom machinery for increased efficiency. This album is a salesman sample photograph album providing an overview of inventions and technology developed by the Trundle Engineering Company. Machinery represented here includes spiral meat-cutting machine, matchbook cover book-cutting machine, traffic signal control boxes, spinning machine for making artificial silk, ice cream freezing machinery, remote control spotlight, and a golf ball center compression test machine.

Dates: 1930

Wallace Hume Carothers materials on Nylon

 Collection
Accession: 2726
Abstract:

Wallace Hume Carothers (1896-1937) was a chemist and inventor of Neoprene artificial rubber and Nylon synthetic fiber. He worked as a chemist in E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company's Fundamental Research Program from 1928 until his death in 1937. This small collection consists of a mixture of materials collected in the decades following Carothers death related to the development of Nylon and polymerization. Included are reprinted articles, patent applications, biographical materials, and newspaper clippings.

Dates: 1933-1997