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Woodlawn Trustees, Inc. records

Accession 2424.I

Manuscripts and Archives Department, Hagley Museum and Library


PO Box 3630
Wilmington, Delaware, 19807
302-658-2400
research@hagley.org

This finding aid was produced using the Archivists' Toolkit 2013-06-27T13:00-0400

Finding aid prepared using best local practices and Describing Archives: A Content Standard

Cite items for this collection in the following format:
[Description and dates], Box/folder number, Woodlawn Trustees, Inc. records (Accession 2424.I), Hagley Museum and Library, Wilmington, DE 19807

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Descriptive Summary

Title: Woodlawn Trustees, Inc. records
Dates: 1880-2005, bulk 1901-1995
Accession Number: 2424.I
Creator: Woodlawn Trustees, Incorporated
Extent: 56 linear feet
Language of Material: English
Repository: Hagley Museum and Library: Manuscripts and Archives Department
Abstract: The Woodlwan Trustees are responsible for maintaining affordable housing in the city of Wilmington and for the orderly development of large tracts of suburban land, mostly located in Brandywine Hundred between Concord Pike and the Brandywine Creek and running north from Rockland Road into Delaware County, Pa. Their records include charters, minutes, officer lists, directors' correspondence, real estate records, property maps, reports, drawings and specifications and newspaper and journal articles on the history of the Trustees and of the Bancroft family.
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Administrative Information


Access Restrictions

Records less than 25 years old are restricted.

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Historical Note

The history of the Woodlawn Trustees, Inc. is a study in orderly development of urban and suburban growth designed to benefit the economic, social, and recreational needs of the residents of Wilmington and New Castle County, Delaware.

The evolution of the spirit and mission of Woodlawn began with the company's founder William Poole Bancroft (1835-1928) whose dream was "for someone to gather up the rough land along the Brandywine Creek above Rockland and hold it for the future Wilmington, a Wilmington of hundreds of thousands of people." He said, "It has been a hobby, or a concern with me, for more than twenty-six years, to endeavor to get park land for the advantage of the people of Wilmington and its vicinity." (From a copy of a paper read by William Poole Bancroft before a meeting of the West Brandywine Grange, February 18, 1909).

William Poole Bancroft was born in Rockford, near Wilmington, Delaware on July 12, 1835. His parents were Joseph Bancroft, founder of the cotton mills Joseph Bancroft & Sons, and Sarah Poole, daughter of William Poole, a silversmith and miller. Both parents were members of the Society of Friends. William's part- time employment in his father's cotton mill at age seven taught him to not only appreciate the rewards of hard work, but also the benefits of preserving the resources upon which the mills depended. William worked full time in the mills at the age 14, and by age 30 he was made a partner in the business. The profits of the cotton mill provided William and his brother Samuel with a comfortable life. With his share of the profits, William began to purchase open space with the intent to grant it outright or sell it, without profit, to the City of Wilmington for park lands. He was especially interested in providing public parks, parkways, and well planned residential areas. He hoped that working citizens could find low cost housing in neighborhoods which included important educational and social institutions, such as a school and library, as well as retail establishments, and, most importantly, parks for recreational activities.

By 1901, Bancroft had purchased hundreds of acres of undeveloped land and he formed a corporation governed by five directors who would oversee future acquisitions. He transferred his land holdings to the company which was named The Woodlawn Company. The charter of the new company stated "The nature of the business, or objects, or purposes to be transacted, promoted, or carried on are as follows--For the benefit of the people of Wilmington and its vicinity--to acquire without limitation as to amount, by gift, devise, purchase or otherwise, and to hold, own, use, mortgage, lease, pledge, sell, assign, transfer, and convey in fee simple or otherwise XXXXXXX real estate, bonds, stocks, goods, and chattels XXXXX and property of every class and description as it shall be believed will be beneficial as aforesaid." ("The Hope of the Woodlawn Trustees," C.A. Beck, 1922).

The charter further stated that land acquisitions would be transferred to the Mayor and City Council of Wilmington provided that they were used for parks or playground purposes; that the lands would be transferred, provided that there was wise planning in the development of the city; and that there would be construction of houses and other buildings which might be considered beneficial under the charter. It is clear from the charter that the Woodland Company's mission emphasized that the lands acquired by the City were to be used for parks, wise urban planning and, housing if the directors of the Woodlawn Company deemed it wise.

William Bancroft also believed that the City of Wilmington would outgrow its current boundaries and he began to purchase land in the Brandywine Hundred area in New Castle County. By 1922, according to Charles Beck's paper "The Hope of the Woodlawn Trustees," Woodlawn owned about 1900 acres between the Brandywine Creek and the Concord Pike (Route 202) from Rockland Road to the Pennsylvania state line, and intended to preserve the open space for park lands and well planned residential areas. In 2010 much of the property west of the Concord Pike is still owned by Woodlawn.

Some stock of the Woodlawn Company was awarded to non-profit institutions in Wilmington, dividends from which would provide a constant source of income. Additional shares of stock were purchased by William Bancroft, his wife Emma Cooper Bancroft, other members of the Bancroft family, and prominent individuals in Wilmington. Earlier, in 1884, Bancroft sponsored legislation to form the Wilmington Park Commission. He served on the board of the Park Commission from 1884 until 1922, agreeing to be president for the final 18 years of his tenure.

During his term as a Park Commissioner Bancroft worked not only to preserve and conserve park land, but to build a connecting road between two large parks (Rockford Park in Northeast Wilmington and Canby Park in West Wilmington). In 1912 he proposed a tree-lined boulevard and low cost housing along the boulevard for the benefit of the hard working residents that lived in Woodlawn "flats." Construction of the boulevard met with frequent obstructions, but it was finally completed. The City of Wilmington, acknowledging Bancroft's effort to beautify the several neighborhoods adjacent to the boulevard, named the street Bancroft Parkway in 1932.

The parkway project illustrates the patience and business practices of the Woodlawn Trustees for the benefit of the community. The parkway was proposed in 1912, but was not completed and named until 1932. While the need was clear, and Bancroft's dream had merit, Woodlawn waited patiently for community approval while gathering the resources to build the boulevard and acquired the land to fulfill the dream. The boulevard was constructed in two "halves," separated by the B & O Railroad tracks at 9th Street and Grant Avenue. Bridge construction over the railroad tracks came to a halt with a shortage of steel during the Depression and during World War II, thus leaving Bancroft's dream unfulfilled. The two "halves" of the boulevard were not connected until 2005 when a footbridge was constructed across the railroad tracks as part of the beautification of the neighborhood. The "new" neighborhood included a new public library, appropriately named the Woodlawn Library (Woodlawn had donated space, utilities and maintenance to a much smaller library since 1925) and gardens in a new well-groomed community park. With financing from the Woodlawn Trustees and New Castle County, Bancroft's dream - one beautiful uninterrupted boulevard from Rockford Park to Canby Park - at long last (1912-2005) was finally real. Nearby residents could then walk directly to their neighborhood library without driving to avoid the railroad tracks.

"Flats"

The "flats" were the first houses constructed by Woodlawn, on property bounded by Fourth and Seventh Streets, northwest of Union Street and the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad in Wilmington. The "flats" were row houses of four or six rooms, semi-detached houses of four, six, or eight rooms, and apartments of three, four, five, six or eight rooms. Originally not all of the houses were equipped with modern utilities, heating and appliances, but these were updated as more modern equipment and capital became available. The "flats" project (20 acres) was begun in 1903, at a time when small houses were in great demand in Wilmington. Rents from the "flats" were kept at a moderate level to attract working people, and were intended to provide capital to be used for philanthropic activities, to provide funds to maintain the rental units, and to provide an investment for the educational non-profit institutions which held shares of stock in the Woodlawn Company.

William Bancroft consulted Charles W. Leavitt and Frederick Law Olmstead, noted urban planners, civil engineers and landscape designers, to plan the community. Between 1903 and 1914, 20 long rows of houses, 398 units, were constructed, providing housing for 390 families, or 1,300-1,500 people. It is noteworthy to remember that all the houses were built without the advantage of steam powered machinery or power tools. Basements were hand-dug, boards were hand-cut and manpower was the only true resource for craftsmanship. Bancroft originally provided financing but eventually rent payments financed new construction. From 1914 until the 1930s no additional units were constructed, but there were several modifications and alterations to reduce larger houses to smaller apartment, due to the changing demands of the renters. Some additional houses were constructed during the 1940s, 1950s, and 1960s. In 1970 there were a total of 455 units owned and rented by Woodlawn in the Flats area of Wilmington. In 1991 the trustees listed 457 units, one store, one library, a maintenance shop, a warehouse, and 94 garages.

On February 15, 1912 William Bancroft wrote a letter to the directors of the Woodlawn Company, projecting that the construction of Woodlawn Houses would probably end in 1913, due to the shortage of space for new homes near the Woodlawn Tract in Wilmington. He stated that he was looking to the Brandywine Hundred area in New Castle County for additional property. Bancroft had already purchased more than 1,000 acres and was looking for more. He offered his property to the Woodlawn Company, and presumed that capital generated from rents of the "flats" would be available for long term use for buying farms in the "country." Recognizing that a large acquisition of land was inevitable, Bancroft suggested that the lands be held in trust for the community. The board agreed to transfer all properties to a trust to be governed by a group named the Woodlawn Trustees. The stock in the company that was owned by charitable organizations was converted to 5% bonds for the benefit of those institutions. Stock held by individuals was given to the trust. The Internal Revenue Service granted tax-exempt status to the new organization in 1927. The Certificate of Incorporation for the Woodlawn Trustees, Inc. reiterated that the purposes of the Trustees were (1) acquiring and holding lands for parks and recreation (2) wise community planning and wise development of the trust's holdings and (3) construction of housing deemed wise by the Trustees.

Citizens Housing Corporation

The Woodlawn Trustees acquired properties in Wilmington owned by the Citizens Housing Corporation (CHC), an organization which in 1925 began to purchase and rehabilitate houses in the African American community. By 1960 the CHC had sold about 98% of its stock to the Woodlawn Trustees, who had agreed to buy the 60 housing units for more than face value to avoid collapse of the CHC. By 1970 the CHC (Woodlawn) owned 90 units and by 1991 there were 111 units among the residences of the CHC.

Bancroft Humanitarianism

As William Bancroft became more active as an environmentalist and conservationist, he drifted away from the day-to-day management of Joseph Bancroft & Sons Company. However, his treatment of mill workers and his fellow citizens was a direct result from the values learned from his Quaker faith and a sense of honesty and integrity instilled in him by his father Joseph. The "Company" was an early pioneer in the introduction of "welfare work," a term denoting an attempt to bring management closer to the labor force by providing more comfortable working conditions during an age when most companies ignored the plight of those who were "front line" laborers. Earlier, Joseph Bancroft had made workplace improvements. He reduced the number of daily working hours, substituted mules for heavy carrying; paid his workers in cash, rather than using company stores as a focus for remuneration; offered a company savings bank to workers; and provided a school and library at the Brandywine mill.

William Bancroft's philanthropic activities reflected lessons learned as a devout Quaker and from his background in business. Records exist which document his personal long-term grants to students, financial support to non-profit institutions, and most importantly the contributions of open space for recreational use to the residents of City of Wilmington, New Castle County and the State of Delaware.

Bancroft realistically judged that his dream of far-reaching park land for residents of Wilmington and New Castle County might not be possible during his lifetime. There were delays in securing the properties he desired. Many landowners did not wish to sell their land, or set the asking price at a level considered too high by Woodlawn who would then wait until a better price was quoted. Some projects were not completed until decades after Woodlawn's original interest (such as the Bancroft Parkway project). If the deal was not "right," the deal could "wait." However, whether the Trustees were involved in issues in the "flats," or the Citizens Housing Corporation, or in the "country," they were regarded with utmost respect, with rare exceptions. They were fair, but realistic in their real estate transactions. Their integrity was rarely questioned, and their word was their bond.

Following Bancroft's death in 1928, and his wife Emma's death in 1929, the Woodlawn Trustees pursued the work of their founder. During the Great Depression, tenants in the Woodlawn houses were greatly affected by unemployment and poverty. The trustees were lenient in the collection of rents, and helped their tenants to rebound from the Depression and slowly pay their debts. The Trustees started a building program to assist unemployed laborers and craftsmen and the following was constructed: 33 garages, a warehouse addition,13 four-room houses, and three pairs of six-room semi-detached houses. In 1940 construction continued with the addition of more houses and garages, but World War II caused the building program to come to a halt. Following the war, however, construction resumed to honor a contract with the DuPont Company to build four pairs of six-room houses to be rented to DuPont employees. The project was besieged by so many problems caused by few experienced workers and a lack of materials that Woodlawn decided to wait for a better economy to undertake similar building programs in the future.

The "Country"

The economy in the next three decades was more conducive to development in the "country" north of Wilmington. In the late 1940s the Trustees had decided that low cost housing, although important to the tenants, was not a sound investment for the future. They were determined to continue to maintain and improve the "flats" when needed, and to retain moderate rents for houses in the City. However, securing the capital for maintaining urban low cost housing would have to come from commercial development of the Brandywine Hundred acreage in New Castle County and Delaware County Pennsylvania. Since the early days of the century, Woodlawn held properties in New Castle County and Delaware County, Pennsylvania. It was time to plan orderly development in those areas, combining commercial and residential construction while setting aside significant lands for recreational purposes. Proceeds from development in the "country" would continue to help support Woodlawn's urban investments, and to maintain the large areas of open space that Woodlawn would eventually grant to the State for public parks.

During the 1950s the neighborhood developments of Alapocas, Woodbrook and Sharpley were begun, followed by the construction of Edenridge and Tavistock in the 1970s. Records indicate that the developments in Brandywine Hundred had been part of a Master Plan designed by Charles Leavitt in 1922, and later revised by Whitman, Requardt and Associates in 1973. Complimenting the construction of homes were property sales to restaurants, business offices and retail stores in the 1980s. In the 1990s the Trustees recorded their ownership of properties in Brandywine Hundred, Delaware and Delaware County Pennsylvania to include 25 houses, five houses with barns; six farms, one farmette; three commercial rentals; and 30 agricultural leases. William Bancroft's "dream package" was almost complete. The only missing piece of his Master Plan would be the addition of extensive park lands and greenways.

Parks

The acquisition of land for park use was clearly a primary goal for William Bancroft and later the Woodlawn Trustees. The proceeds from any lands which were rented or sold for profit were used for maintaining the parks and rental units. By the time Bancroft died in 1928, he had donated more than 200 acres to the City of Wilmington for park use. With the creation of the Wilmington Board of Park Commissioners in 1883, Bancroft found a set of sympathetic ears to listen to his ideas about the use of open space for enhancing the quality of life among his neighbors. William M. Canby was elected president of the Board of Park Commissioners. Canby's hobby was the study of botany. He traveled and corresponded with his friends Charles Darwin and John Muir, as well as his cousin William P. Bancroft, all of whom were influenced by each other's eagerness to preserve park land. Other members of the board were Henry A. du Pont, Joseph L. Carpenter, George W. Bush, another William Canby, William P. Bancroft, Edward Betts, Francis N. Buck, Thomas F. Bayard and J. Taylor Gause. Each member was a very influential member of the community, which gave credibility to any decisions formulated by the board.( "Development of a Public Park in Wilmington," by Priscilla Thompson, December 12, 1976).

As early as 1881 William Bancroft unsuccessfully requested that E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company donate land to the City of Wilmington for a park. He again mentioned the subject at the first meeting of the Board of Park Commissioners, but there was no response. So Bancroft offered the city his own property of 50 acres, located in Rockford. Months after Bancroft's offer, the Board suggested that Frederick Law Olmstead, noted landscape designer, be consulted as to the suitability of Bancroft's land, and lands in the current Brandywine Park area, for parks. Following much deliberation about Olmstead's favorable report for purchasing the land, the Park Commissioners agreed to present Olmstead's recommendation to City Council. City Council purchased most of the Brandywine Park lands in 1886. Although William Bancroft's offer did not include land in Brandywine Park, it was his enthusiasm for a park system that finally persuaded City Council to invest in park lands. Later the City received lands from Bancroft or Woodlawn which today comprise most of the open space set aside for parks in Wilmington. (See Priscilla Thompson's "Gifts and Sales of Parks to the City of Wilmington by William P. Bancroft 1886-1919," January, 1982. Thompson lists 18 parks in Wilmington, with land from which was transferred from William Bancroft or Woodlawn).

The gifts of park lands from Woodlawn did not cease after Bancroft's death. In 1981 the Woodlawn Trustees transferred a large tract of land to the State of Delaware as an addition to Brandywine Creek State Park. More than 500 acres of land previously acquired by Bancroft, the Woodlawn Company, and the Woodlawn Trustees was transferred to the State.

The first lands to be identified as Brandywine Creek State Park were 433 acres purchased at the urging of Forward Lands, Inc., an organization devoted to preservation of open space. With grants from the Crystal Trust, the Longwood Foundation, and the Woodlawn Trustees, the State was able to match a grant from the Delaware Water Conservation Aid Fund to create the state's sixth state park. Coupled with the 500 acres transferred by the Woodlawn Trustees, the park continues to be one of the state's largest public parks.

In October, 1981 at a ceremony in Brandywine Creek State Park, the Woodlawn Trustees announced that a foundation had been established to protect and maintain the Park. The Trust Fund continues today, adding assets to the fund from conservationists, preservationists and individuals who, because of the efforts of the Woodlawn Trustees, have enjoyed the beauty of parks.

The most recent state park in Delaware is the Alapocas Run State Park which was created on land originally transferred to the state by Woodlawn. Alapocas was one of the first neighborhoods created in the Brandywine Hundred area by Woodlawn. Nearby was Alfred I. du Pont's Blue Ball Barn, built in 1914 and adjacent to the site of Blue Ball Tavern and inn. At the turn of the 21st century the State converted the renovated barn, and a 27,000 square foot Can-Do Boundless Playground for children into a recreational area for a public park. The barn contains the park office, a conference center and art galleries.

The Can-Do Playground offers unbounded space for children's activities of all kinds.

Objects not achieved, Opportunities lost

With the addition of parks to the other two elements of William Bancroft's mission--namely, housing, and planned communities with shops, schools, libraries and other enhancements for quality of life--Woodlawn had nearly completed their founder's dream. From time to time during their history, the Woodlawn Trustees pondered their achievements. In 1990, the board deliberated over the report "William Bancroft and Woodlawn: Objects not achieved, Opportunities lost." ("William Bancroft and Woodlawn: Objects not achieved, Opportunities lost," a report compiled by Stephen Clark, with sketch maps by Lynn Williams, for the Board of Woodlawn Trustees, 6/14/1990). In the report, "objects not achieved" alludes to (1) a connection to the two "halves" of the Bancroft Parkway (subsequently achieved in 2005) and (2) a park connection from Brandywine Park to Alapocas Woods (achieved in 2009 with a walking trail). Among the lost opportunities were listed the purchase of (1) the Bancroft Mill property lying north and south of the Brandywine at Rockford (2) The Bird/ Malone property in Beaver Valley, Pennsylvania and (3) The Fulenwider property, along Smith's Bridge Road in Pennsylvania. It is not known if the list has been updated.

Legal Issues

Although Woodlawn's positive reputation is well documented, the Trustees have not been without problems during the 20th century. Although an infrequent occurrence, Woodlawn has been involved with legal issues.

The question of Woodlawn's tax-exempt status has, from time to time, become an issue with the U.S. Internal Revenue Service. In 1927 Woodlawn was granted tax-exempt status, following a four year dispute to clarify the philanthropic nature of the organization. In 1937 Woodlawn's claim for an exemption from paying tax on capital stock was met with an objection from the IRS initially, but was overruled, provided that the purposes of Woodlawn had not changed from those for which it was originally created. Also in 1937 Woodlawn was asked to show reason for claiming a tax exemption, and the 1937 ruling was affirmed. Issues with the IRS seemed to be rare during the next 26 years, until Woodlawn's exemption was revoked in 1963, and they received a statement from the U.S. Treasury Department showing due a balance of $103,465.84 for the period ending December 31, 1964. As a result of the revocation, Woodlawn was forced to pay taxes from the year 1951 through 1964. A long legal dispute ensued, and following a favorable ruling regarding the tax emption, Woodlawn sued the U.S. Government for back taxes and won. The issue of philanthropy was the primary argument for each suit with the IRS.

At the same time as the Woodlawn Trustees were discussing their tax exempt status with the IRS, they became involved with a challenge of a different nature. In September 1963 the Wilmington Monthly Meeting adopted a statement which called for Woodlawn to institute open housing without discrimination. The Monthly Meeting appointed a five person committee to write to all members of the Woodlawn Trustees who were members of the Society of Friends. The Committee's report stated that a deed to property in Alapocas in 1936 restricted residency to Caucasians, and that Woodlawn lacked a policy on the race, creed or national origin of their residents. Woodlawn believed that there was no evidence that William Bancroft had any policy to integrate housing. Nevertheless, the committee believed that the Woodlawn Trustees should consider integrating their housing. Woodlawn was urged to integrate housing by news reporters, various representatives of neighborhood organizations, protests in front of Philip Rhoads' house by Monthly Meeting members, and by the New Castle County Housing Commission. Eventually the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that federal law barred all racial discrimination (private or public), in the sale or rental of property. The community's protest persisted through the late 1960s, beyond Dr. King's assassination, and beyond the riots in downtown Wilmington. The protesters requested open housing for Wilmington residents, and for residents of New Castle County in those developments already being constructed on Woodlawn's lands. In 1969 one more committee was created by the Wilmington Monthly Meeting to convince Woodlawn to change its housing policy, declaring that Woodlawn, in its decision to sell lands for upscale residential houses and commercial property in Brandywine Hundred, had clearly drifted from the original mission of William Bancroft. As a response to the criticism and to determine the feasibility of providing low cost housing in Brandywine Hundred, Woodlawn decided to create a Master Plan for developing their holdings in the Brandywine Hundred area (the "country"). The plan, completed in June 1971, concluded that low cost housing in New Castle County was not economically feasible for Woodlawn. This was due to the high cost of construction and the need to charge high rents or sale prices which would be beyond the reach for those who needed it.

Woodlawn's housing policy continued to be a divisive element in the Wilmington Monthly Meeting, with some Quakers believing that the Trustees were following Bancroft's dream, while others thought not. The issue was further exacerbated by a resolution of the Wilmington's City Council calling for a policy from Woodlawn stating opposition to discrimination in housing. In 1972 the Woodlawn Trustees agreed to a Delaware State Human Relations Commission request to establish a policy that Woodlawn would not discriminate in awarding housing due to race, creed or national origin. All protest from the Wilmington and Philadelphia Monthly Meetings ceased, and in 1981 an article in the Wilmington News Journal declared the "flats" to be "a model of integration."

During the latter portion of the ongoing discussion about discrimination, an event occurred which intensified the issue. It was a lawsuit brought by Mrs. William du Pont in December 1972. She had been refused the sale of a house by Woodlawn on Mt. Lebanon Road in Talleyville. The property was listed for sale for $75,000, and Mrs. du Pont offered a down payment while confirming her acceptance of the purchase by letter. When she stated that the house would be used for a home for neglected children, the sale was rejected, and the down payment was returned. Mrs. du Pont's position was that Woodlawn did not want to sell to an organization that would permit African American children to inhabit the house, and therefore Woodlawn was discriminating. The suit was dismissed with prejudice in October 1974.

The 1960s and 1970s were years of challenge for the Woodlawn Trustees. They prepared volumes of information and documents used in the hearings for the revocation of Woodlawn's tax exempt status, and subsequent suits with the U.S. Government and the State of Delaware for back taxes, the claims of discrimination by the Society of Friends, and Martha Ann du Pont's discrimination suit. The pressure was so great that in the 1970s the Trustees' were preparing plans to sell all of their assets. Woodlawn continues to plan and develop urban and suburban growth.

The Future

By the 1960s Concord Pike, formerly a country road bounded by undeveloped farmland, became a thriving growth zone with retail shops, commercial office buildings, and professional businesses. The growth continued into the next 35 years resulting in thorough development with residential and commercial structures. Due to the popularity of a "new" interstate highway with convenient exits to Brandywine Hundred, and with the focus of shopping shifting from Wilmington to the northern suburbs, heavy traffic seemed to defeat the purpose of moving out to the "pleasurable life." The Woodlawn Trustees, putting aside the list of "opportunities lost," at least for the moment, became one of the primary agents for change in Brandywine Hundred. Woodlawn promoted wise planning in the growth of the new commercial hub. Open space and greenways were integrated with the furious pace of construction of restaurants, hotels, office buildings, and professional businesses on lands leased or sold by Woodlawn.

In 2008, many residents believed that there was no more room for development in Brandywine Hundred. However, Woodlawn's president, Elke McGinley, disagreed. In an article in a local newspaper, McGinley was reported to say that William Bancroft's early sketches of the Brandywine Hundred area coincided with 21st century plans to develop the intersection of Concord Pike and Beaver Valley Road. "His idea was that people needed to work, shop and have recreation somewhere." She added, "Communities have to grow, but in an orderly fashion." Woodlawn still owns 1,970 acres in northern New Castle County, extending into Pennsylvania. McGinley said that Woodlawn would continue to leave the open space in the Brandywine Valley untouched for the enjoyment of those who continue to walk the trails and greenways. However, she noted, Woodlawn was still the largest provider of affordable housing in Wilmington with nearly 600 rental units. Housing needs constant maintenance, and Woodlawn must continue to lease much of its lands for income to maintain the housing to which it is already committed. McGinley admitted that more of Woodlawn's property along Concord Pike would eventually be leased or sold for commercial purposes, but that would be done slowly, with the best interests of Woodlawn's tenants and the residents of New Castle County in mind.("The Preservation Puzzle: Woodlawn Trustees a Century Later," by Jesse Chadderdon, Community News, July 29, 2008).

The Woodlawn Trustees, Inc. archives is valuable for understanding various historical aspects of social progress. The collection can be used to study the organization's motivation for, and rewards from, preservation and conservation of natural resources. The collection documents the organization's approach to its huge undertaking of real estate and development. While some might decide to study Woodlawn's propensity for honest business management, others might choose to learn Woodlawn's art and science of urban and suburban planning. Most of all, any student of the Woodlawn Trustees will understand that a business can be successful while in pursuit of one man's dream of enhancing the quality of life of his neighbors.

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Scope and Content

The records of the Woodlawn Trustees include charters, minutes, officer lists, directors' correspondence, real estate records, property maps, reports, drawings and specifications and newspaper and journal articles on the history of the Trustees and of the Bancroft family. Subjects covered include the development of the city park system and the Bancroft Parkway, the building and maintenance of the "Woodlawn Flats," the Citizens Housing Corporation, the development of post-World War II suburbs, the Quaker beliefs of the Trustees and discussions withing the Society of Friends over their development activities and the disputes over racial discrimination in housing and segregation in the suburbs.

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Arrangement

Series are arranged by function.

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Separated Material

The slides, photographs, collages and renderings were transferred to Accession 2010.276 in the Audiovisual Collections and Digital Initiatives Department at the Hagley Library.

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Series Descriptions and Inventory

I. Administrative Records
A. Corporate Vision and Mission, 1882-1999
Scope and Content
This chronological file contains William Poole Bancroft's vision for urban and suburban planning, recreational parks, and affordable housing. These documents record Bancroft's own words, as well subsequent writings by his successors, who pursued the vision of their founder diligently.
This subseries contains William Poole Bancroft's vision for parks, orderly urban and suburban development, and low cost housing, as expressed in his letters and speeches, and remembrances by his colleagues and successors. Reports, brief histories by contemporaries, as well as news articles articulating the mission of the Woodlawn Company and the Woodlawn Trustees, Inc. are in this subseries.
Box
OS 1 Painting of William Poole Bancroft, by Percy Bigland [Pictorial Collections, Accession 2010.276], 1906; photograph
Box Folder
1 1 Letter to William Sellers, November 5, 1882 [regarding Bancroft's wish to purchase 80 acres for a public park for the people of Wilmington]
1 1 Excerpt from Bancroft's letter books, 1901 [regarding a plan to build up a tract of land bounded by 4th, 7th, and Union Streets for small homes affordable by working families (later to become the "Flats")]
1 1 News Article from the Delmarva Star, July 13, 1919 [reporting that the non-profit group was formed for the benefit of the people of Wilmington and its vicinity, according to its certificate of incorporation]
Drawer Folder
MD 109 3 Map showing the confluence of the Brandywine and Christina Rivers in the area of Wilmington, including businesses along the Christina River, 1904
Box Folder
1 1 Photograph of a color drawing of the original layout for the "Flats," construction to begin in 1902 for 450 units of affordable rental housing, 1902
1 1 Speech by William Bancroft in 1909 to the West Brandywine Grange regarding his 26 year "hobby" of gathering lands to be used as parks, 1909
1 1 Excerpt from Bancroft's letter books in 1912 describing his wish to continue purchasing land in Brandywine Hundred for parks in Wilmington which he later thought would be annexed, 1912
1 1 Brief explanation of Bancroft's offer of park land to the City of Wilmington in 1915, and the Wilmington Park Commission's purchase land that had been offered, without referring to WPB'S offer, 1915
1 1 Letter to the Woodlawn Trustees about Bancroft's aims and purposes, June 24, 1919
Drawer Folder
MD 109 3 Map of City lands to the North and East of the Brandywine Creek, 1939
Box Folder
1 2 "The Hope of the Woodlawn Trustees" by Charles A. Beck, 1922
1 2 "Woodlawn Trustees, A Story of Social Services On A Special Basis," the Equitable Trust Company Monthly, by E.D. Prince, January 1922
1 2 "The Woodlawn District" by Charles A. Beck, 1922
1 2 "The Woodlawn Trustees, Alias William Bancroft," in One-Two-One-Four, a house paper for Smedley of Brosius and Smedley, September 1924
1 3 "The Story of Woodlawn" by Theodore Beck, 1971
1 3 "Operations and Purposes of Woodland" by Philip Rhoads, 1972
1 3 "Aims and Policies of Woodlawn, by Philip Rhoads, 1973
1 4 "William Bancroft, He Dared To Think Big," Delaware Today, August 1973
1 4 Restatement of Aims and Policies - Annual Meeting, 1973
1 4 "Descriptions, Goals, and Accomplishments 1918-1960," by Lynn Williams, 1990
1 4 "A Brief Description of Woodlawn Trustees, Incorporated," by Lynn Williams, 1999
B. Evolution of the Corporate Structure, 1901-1974
Scope and Content
This set of files reports the need for Bancroft to incorporate as The Woodlawn Company. Then understanding the benefit of a non-profit company he formed Woodlawn Trustees, Inc. in 1918, and finally dissolved the Woodlawn Company in 1926.
As Bancroft's property holdings grew, a company was formed to manage a corporate approach to the additional huge acquisition of lands which were to be used for low cost housing and future parks. In 1901 he named the new organization the Woodlawn Company (see "The Story of Woodlawn," by Theodore Beck, 1971 included in these records). This subseries is also comprised of records which report the dissolution of the for-profit Woodlawn Company in 1918 and the creation of a new non-profit Woodlawn Trustees, Inc. with the stockholders of the old company contributing all shares to the new organization. The original Certificate of Incorporation and its revisions, the by-laws of the new company and all of its amendments through 1976 are included here.
Box Folder
1 5 Meeting, November 15, 1918 [copy of notes, meeting of those whose charitable institutions held stock in the Woodlawn Company. Woodlawn proposed that the new company, The Woodlawn Trustees, would not hold any capital stock, and that the stock belonging to the charitable organizations should be converted to 5% bonds, the income from which would be distributed to those institutions annually]
1 5 Certificate of incorporation of Woodlawn Trustees, Inc., December 5, 1918; 4 copies
1 5 Woodlawn's office manual "Policies and Suggestions For Transactions of Business," composed by Charles A. Beck in 1920, revised in 1938
1 5 Certificate of incorporation as amended in 1943; 4 copies
1 5 Certificate of dissolution of Woodlawn Company, April 7, 1926; original and copy
1 5 Directors' meeting, May 17, 1948
1 6 By-laws of Woodlawn Trustees, Inc. with amendments through 1969, 1918-1969
1 7 Discussion papers about amending Woodlawn's certificate of incorporation to restate the mission of the corporation and to create an executive committee of the board, 1972-1974 [copy of the restated certificate of incorporation is included, dated October 3, 1974]
C. Directors and Officers, 1901-1981
Scope and Content
This subseries is comprised of a list of directors and officers of the Woodlawn Company and the Woodlawn Trustees, as well as their miscellaneous correspondence, 1901-1981.
This subseries includes a list of trustees and officers in Theodore Beck's report "The Story of Woodlawn." It also includes miscellaneous records about various subjects including property holdings, open housing, and other records provided by directors of Woodlawn.
Box Folder
1 8 List of directors and officers and a list of those who resigned or had died with their terms in office, 1901-1972
1 9-12 Correspondence received by Woodlawn, 1916-1928 [generally pertains to legal matters; arranged alphabetically within each year]
1 Letter books of Woodlawn correspondence, 1901-1928 [See six letter books in Box 2]
Box
DC 1 Letter from Stephen Clark in New Orleans to his parents, January 1, 1938
DC 1 Letter from Stephen Clark in New Orleans, January 11, 1939
DC 1 Letter to Stephen Clark from Bancroft Clark, February 12, 1959
DC 1 Letter to Stephen Clark from Pat Taylor, December 19, 1976 [includes a photo of two horses]
DC 1 Letter (in French) to Stephen Clark from Clark Shoes, France, May 2, 1977
DC 1 Correspondence between Stephen Clark, long time president of Woodlawn Trustees, and Marie Arrich, 1978-1987
DC 1 Letter from Stephen Clark to Ruth Rhoads Cooch (daughter of J.E. Rhoads) regarding photos, and Mr. Rhoads's death, November 16, 1983
Oversize
1 Stephen Clark's correspondence about his trip to America in 1979, and earlier correspondence to Nathan Clark, 1979
Box Folder
1 13-14 Letters written to Woodlawn requesting permission to camp on Woodlawn property, 1977-1981
D. Minutes of Directors' and Trustees' Meetings, 1936-1982
Scope and Content
Although there are very few records of the minutes of the Woodlawn Company, there are references to actions taken which affirm the Company's original mission and are included here. Also included here are minutes of meetings of the Woodlawn Trustees, 1936-1982, which include much information further described elsewhere among boxes of Trustees' records listed in the finding aid.
Box Folder
1 15 Officers Reports for Annual Meetings, 1936-1942 [balance sheets only]
1 16 Minutes, 1944-1948
1 17 Minutes, 1950-1954
1 18 Minutes, 1955-1956
1 19 Minutes, 1957-1958
1 20 Minutes, 1959-1960
1 21 Minutes, 1961-1962
1 22 Minutes, 1963-1964
1 23 Minutes, 1965-1966
1 24 Minutes, 1967-1968
1 25 Minutes, 1969-1970
1 26 Minutes, 1971-1972
1 27 Minutes, 1973
1 28 Minutes, 1974
Box Folder
DC 2 29 Minutes, 1975
DC 2 30 Minutes, 1976
DC 2 31 Minutes, 1977
DC 2 32 Minutes, 1978
DC 2 33 Minutes, 1979
DC 2 34 Minutes, 1980
DC 2 35 Minutes, 1981
Box Folder
DC 3 36 Minutes, 1982
DC 3 37 Minutes, 1983
DC 3 38 Minutes, 1984
DC 3 39 Minutes, 1998
E. Correspondence, 1920-2000
Scope and Content
Contains seven letter books. Three contain correspondence of the Woodlawn Company; three contain correspondence of the Woodlawn Trustees, Inc.; and one contains a letter book of Charles Beck, 1912-1926.
Notes and letters to/from the directors and officers of the Woodlawn Company and the Woodlawn Trustees are included here. Letter books of Woodlawn, 1901-1928, and miscellaneous correspondence of directors and officers also appear in this subseries.
Box Folder
2 1 Miscellaneous correspondence to Trustees, 1920-2000
2 2 Correspondence of Philip Rhoads, 1937-1973
2 Correspondence, 7/2/1901-6/3/1909; letterbook
2 Correspondence, 6/3/1909-11/19/1913; letterbook
2 Correspondence, 11/19/1913-1/17/1919; letterbook
2 Correspondence, 1/23/1919-1/17/1923; letterbook
2 Correspondence, 1/24/1923-6/15/1925; letterbook
2 Correspondence, 6/15/1925-2/15/1928; letterbook
F. Organizations of Interest to Woodlawn, 1918-2005
Scope and Content
Contains information about various agencies and institutions that had an impact on Woodlawn's mission or that was a charity which Woodlawn supported. Interest extended also to people who influenced Woodlawn and their employees.
Woodlawn collected information about organizations in which they were interested for various reasons. They were interested in organizations which might be competitors for real estate acquisitions, or which had the same interests in conservation and preservation of open space, or which shared Woodlawn's goal of enhancing people's social, educational and recreational quality of life, or which might impact on the welfare of city and county residents. As in all other aspects of their business, their interest in a great variety of organizations in the community was vast. Information about those organizations is collected here.
Box Folder
3 1 Information presented by the Greater Wilmington Development Council about Brandywine Mills, 1730-1902
3 2 The Brandywine Conservation Project Organization Meeting, March 21, 1945
3 2 Octavia Hill Association, 1950-2000 [based in Philadelphia and refurbishes and rehabilitates communities in a fashion similar to the Woodlawn Trustees]
3 3 Natural Lands Trust, 1954-2000
3 4 News clippings [Delaware Highway Department, the Greater Wilmington Development Council, Little Sisters of the Poor, Shopping Centers, Housing Authorities, Inner Neighborhood Consortium, and the City of Wilmington], 1956-1982
3 5 Two copies of a supplement to the Sunday Delaware State News, entitled Raider's Digest, Ralph Nader's 'The Company State', December 5, 1971
3 5 Copy of the Nader Report that referred to the Woodlawn Trustees as an organization that buffered du Pont properties on the west side of the Concord Pike
3 5 Letter from the Peninsula United Methodist Homes, June 30, 1971
3 5 A newspaper clipping in the Wilmington Morning News, Monday, referring to the Nader Report, December 13, 1971
3 6 Correspondence regarding repair of Rockford Tower, 1972
3 7 Friendship House, Friends of the Concord Pike Library, Greenville Development Corporation, The Lincoln Club, The Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings, Swarthmore College, and the YMCA of Wilmington and New Castle County, 1974-1991 [copy of Reports of Findings A Survey of Popular Attitudes Toward Public Affairs in Wilmington, Delaware Study #2009, July 1974]
3 8 Directory of Private Organizations Concerned With Environment In Delaware, May 1977; 63 pages
3 9 Information on Jewish Community Center; the Old Capitol Trail Greenway Committee and the Interfaith Housing Task Force, 1986-1993
3 10 Information on Rock Manor Park Preservation Council; Regional Land Management Group; Quaker Hill Historic Preservation Foundation, 1989-1995
3 11 Workshop notes of the Upper East Side Development Symposium, 1992-1993
3 12 Handwritten notes for the Upper East Side Development Association and the UES Development Council, 1992-1995
Oversize
3 Woodlawn's agreement with the Urban Environmental Center, 1995
Box Folder
3 13 Meeting notes for the Upper East Side Development Council, the Hendon Property Associates, and Hagley Museum and Library, 1992-1996
3 14 Forward Lands; Harvest Film Works, Inc.; Friends Society of Brandywine Park; Friends of the First State; the Ingerman Group; and the Rodney Square Club, 1980-2000
3 15 Friends School and its activities, 1995-2000
3 16 Preservation Delaware, 1998-2002
Box Folder
3A 1-27 Organizations of interest to Woodlawn, 1972-2003
II. Real Estate and Housing
A. "Flats," 1902-1960s
Scope and Content
From 1902 until 1914 William Bancroft constructed low-cost housing, the rental fees from which he used to maintain parks, and to provide housing for blue collar workers in Wilmington. This subseries includes applications for rental properties and responses from Woodlawn, data about rents, lists of expenses for each building; lists of bidding specifications; furnishings; and information about construction, lists of tenants, and inspections by the Wilmington Department of License and Inspections.
Also contains information about the construction, renovation, furnishings, supplies and maintenance projects for houses in the "Flats" area of Wilmington. Oversize drawings and maps are arranged by date and placed as close as possible to the subjects of the construction and renovations.
Drawer Folder
MD-110 2 Map of the City of Wilmington, 1898
MD-110 2 Brochure with map of Wilmington, 1923
MD-110 2 Map of the Metropolitan District of Wilmington, 1929
MD-110 2 Two color coded maps of Wilmington with radii of 1/2 mile, 1mile, 1 1/2 mile, 2 miles
MD-110 2 Street plan of Wilmington published by Charles Smith
Drawer Folder
MD-109 1 Drawing of Wilmington, block by block, showing a proposed system of sewerage, 1892
MD-109 1 Bancroft's vision for the "flats" as reported by city planner and landscape designer John Nolen (1869-1937) at a meeting in Washington D.C., December 15, 1916
Box Folder
4 1-45 Applications for rental properties, 1937-1970 [Also included are Woodlawn's responses to those who applied (arranged alphabetically by surname). Woodlawn's definition of the word "flat" explained by Steven Clark in 1999, and a brief history of the beginning of the "Flats" precedes the folders in Box 4]
Box Folder
5 1 Property Book of memoranda about select properties in Wilmington, 1914-1916
5 1 Property Book of memoranda about select properties in Wilmington, 1916-1924
5 1 Houses damaged by storm of June 25, 1924 at 5:00 pm, 1924 June 24
5 2 Property Book of memoranda about select properties in Wilmington, 1926-1930
5 3 Rent book and building expenses records for 601 North Bancroft Parkway, as well as total receipts and expenses for Woodlawn Buildings in the "Flats," 1968-1977
5 4-9 Rent books for houses in the "Flats," July 24, 1970-October 31, 1978; 12 volumes
5 10-11 Delinquent files and requests from lawyers to take legal action, 1938-1958
5 12 Requests to tenants for payment for damaged property, 1945 1961
5 12 Requests to tenants to pay garage rents, 1948-1972
5 12 Pyle St. Garages - misuse and offers to buy, 1968-1979
5 13 Sample lease, 1948
5 13 Sample rent increase notice, 1956
5 13 Hardship cases for tenants, 1973-1974
5 14 Rent increases, 1916-1974
5 15 Rent studies, 1948-1970
5 16 Wilmington's attempt to pay rents for the unemployed during the depression and information about post war rent control, 1932-1951
5 17 Lists of Woodlawn's houses in the "Flats" area by type (number of rooms), undated
5 18-20 Lists of tenants in "Flats" houses with address and rents, 1991-1997
5 21 Miscellaneous lists of properties, rents and tenants, 1930-1973
5 22 Units occupied in 1996, move-outs, rental progress for 1997, and list of all rental properties, 1996-1998
5 23 Miscellaneous records regarding "Flats" rents and houses, including uncollected rents, average cost of houses, number of houses by type, and square footage of house types, 1916-1984
Volume
1 Rents ledger, 1904-1920
Volume
2-3 Rents ledger, 1914-1925
Volume
4 Rents ledger, 1921-1930
Volume
5 Rents ledger, 1931-1937
Volume
6 Rents ledger, 1938-1944
Volume
7 Rents ledger, 1945-1952
Volume
8 Rents ledger, 1953-1959
Volume
9 Rents ledger, 1960-1963
Box
OS 13 Rents ledger, 1964-1968
Box
OS 14 Rents ledger, undated
Volume
10 Rents ledger, 1969-1970
Box
OS 15 Rents ledger, 1971-1976
Box
6 Rent receipt books, June 23, 1975-December 30, 1976
Drawer Folder
MD-110 2 Construction of houses - Maps of Wilmington, 1898, 1923, 1929
MD-110 2 Construction of houses - Two color-coded maps of Wilmington showing 1/2 mile, 1 mile, 1 1/2 mile, and 2 mile radius from center city, undated
MD-110 2 Construction of houses - Street plan of Wilmington, undated
Drawer Folder
MD-109 2 Construction of houses - Color map of Wilmington and vicinity, 1942; reprinted 1950
MD-109 6 Construction - Plans for a store and dwelling at 4th & Union, 1903
Roll
O Construction - Plans for a store and dwelling at 4th & Union [Shelf JJ 15 A], 1903
Drawer Folder
MD-109 6 Construction - Tracings for 14 houses and a store on West Springer Street between 6th & 7th Streets, 1903; 20 pages
Drawer Folder
MD-110 5 Construction - Drawings for houses on West Springer between 6th & 7th Sts, 1903-1936
Roll
S Construction - Street plan of Delaware Avenue at Woodlawn, Bayard, and Grant [Shelf JJ 15 B], 1904
S Construction - Floor plans of houses on lots on Delaware Avenue between Red Oak Road and Greenhill Avenue [Shelf JJ 15 B], 1905
Drawer Folder
MD-109 6 Construction - Tracings for one row of nine houses on East Springer Street, between 6th and 7th Streets, 1904
MD-109 6 Construction - Tracings of two rows of twenty-eight houses on Springer Street between 5th & 6th Streets, 1905
MD-109 6 Construction - Tracings of one row of houses on West Grant Street between 4th & 5th Streets and on row of houses on East Grant between 4th TH & 5th Streets, 1906; 19 pages
Drawer Folder
MD-110 1 Construction - Tracings of 26 houses (2 rows) on E. Grant between 5th & 6th Sts., and one row on Union between 4th & 5th, 1907; 10 pages
MD-110 1 Construction - Tracings for 2 rows of houses (28) on Bayard Ave. between 6th & 7th Sts, 1908
MD-110 1 Construction of houses - - Tracings for two rows of houses (28) on Bayard Ave. between 5th & 6th Sts., 1909; 10 pages
MD-110 1 Construction - Tracings for two rows of houses (28) on Union between 5th & 6th Sts, 1910
MD-110 1 Construction - Tracings for one row of houses on Bayard between 4th & 5th Sts., and one row of houses on Ferris between 4th & 5th Sts, 1911
MD-110 1 Construction - Tracings for two rows of houses (28) on Grant between 6th & 7th Sts, 1912
MD-110 1 Construction - Tracings of two rows of houses (28) on Ferris between 5th & 7th Sts.,, 1913; 13 pages
Box
OS 17 Construction - Survey map of corner of Red Oak Rd. & Willard Street, undated
OS 17 Construction - Plot plan of house on corner of Red Oak Rd & Willard St., undated
OS 17 Construction - Drawing of the intersection of Rockford Road, Red Oak Road, Benson Street, and Willard Street showing the People's Railway, undated
OS 17 Construction - Street plan for Rockford Road at Benson and Delaware Avenue, undated
OS 17 Construction - Floor plans of basement and first floors of club stable, undated
OS 17 Construction - Road plan along Delaware Avenue intersecting Bayard & Grant Avenues
Roll
M Construction - Plans for 28 houses on Grant Avenue between 6th & 7th Streets [Shelf JJ 15 A], 1912
Drawer Folder
MD-109 6 Construction, 1903 [Tracings: 14 houses; store on West Springer St. between 6th & 7th Streets; store/dwelling at 401 Union Street]
Drawer Folder
MD-110 4 Construction - Drawings for elevations and floor plans for a store/dwelling at 4th & Union Streets, 1903
Box Folder
7 1 Specifications for the construction of the house of Charles Bush, 1904
Drawer Folder
MD-109 6 Construction - Tracings for 9 houses on East Springer between 6th & 7th Streets, 1904
MD-109 6 Construction - Tracings for 28 houses on Springer Street between 5th & 6th Streets, 1906
MD-109 6 Construction - Tracings for one row of houses on W. Grant between 5th & 6th, and one row of houses on E. Grant between 4th & 5th Streets, 1906
Drawer Folder
MD-110 1 Construction - Tracings of 26 houses on East Grant Ave. between 5th & 6th Sts., and one row of houses on Union Street between 4th & 5th Sts, 1907
Oversize
4 Construction - Specifications for houses, 1903-1908
Drawer Folder
MD-110 1 Construction - Tracings for 28 houses on Bayard Ave, between 6th & 7th Sts, 1908
MD-110 1 Construction - Tracings for 28 houses on Bayard between 5th & 6th Sts, 1909
MD-110 1 Construction - Tracings for 28 houses on Union between 5th & 7th Sts, 1910
MD-110 1 Construction - Tracings for one row of houses on Bayard between 4th & 5th Sts., and one row on Ferris between 4th & 5th Sts, 1911
MD-110 1 Construction - Tracings for 28 houses on Grant between 6th & 7th Sts, 1912
MD-110 1 Construction - Tracings for 28 houses on Ferris between 5th & 7th Sts, 1913
Oversize
5 Construction - Specifications for houses and millwork, 1909-1913
Box Folder
7 2 Construction- Costs for roofing and wiring and lighting fixtures in "Flats" houses, 1919-1925
Drawer Folder
MD-110 4 Construction - Drawings of elevations and floor plans for a store/dwelling at NW corner of 4th & Union Streets, 1903
MD-110 4 Construction - Drawings for a house/store on Ferris between 6th & 7th Streets, 1921
Oversize
6 Specifications for construction and renovation work at specified houses, 1923-1946
Box Folder
7 3 Specifications for the construction of six row houses, east side of grant, S. of 8th St, 1932
7 4 Construction - Specifications for six four-room houses, east side of Bancroft, between 7th and 8th Sts, 1932
Roll
S Construction - Six four-room houses, east side of Bancroft [Shelf JJ 15 B], 1932
Box Folder
7 5 Construction of houses - State and city licenses for contractors, 1935-1941
7 6 Bids and brochures for the construction of garages at 8th St. and Grant Avenue, 1935-1950
7 7 Construction - Specifications for plumbing and heating for four apartments at 614 & 621 Springer St., 1935
7 8 Construction - Specifications for six houses (three pairs semi-detached) W. side of Bancroft, S. of 3rd St., 1937
7 9 Construction - Specifications for seven four-room houses, E. side of Bancroft, between 7th and 8th Sts., 1936-1937
Roll
S Construction - Plans for seven four-room houses [Shelf JJ 15 B], 1936
Box Folder
7 10 Construction - Specifications for six-room houses, cost, bids, and estimates, 1937
7 11 Construction - Specifications for a row of eight garages, north side of Pyle St. between Bancroft & Bayard, 1937
Roll
L Construction - Plans and specifications, eight garages, north side of Pyle St. between Bancroft & Bayard [Shelf JJ 15 A]
Roll
K Construction - Plans for semi-detached houses number 213-223 Bancroft Parkway [Shelf JJ 15 A], 1937
K Construction - Hogan's House, 39th St. between Shipley & Tatnall [Shelf JJ 15 A], undated
Box Folder
7 12 Construction - Specifications for six four-room houses, E. side of Grant, S. of 9th St., 1940 [lumber standards for 1939]
7 13 Construction - Specifications for 12 four-room houses, 828-850 Grant Avenue, 1940-1941
7 14 Construction - Specifications for 8 four-room houses, 812-826 Grant Avenue, 1941
7 15 Construction - Specifications for one ten family apartment building, ## 2101-2119 Pyle St, 1942
7 16 Construction - Specifications for eight houses (four pairs semi-detached) E. side of Bancroft between Lancaster and 2nd St., 1946
7 17 Construction - Lumber lists and plantings list for Grant St. and specifications for an eight room house, 1946
7 18 Construction - Specifications for 10 four-room houses, N. side of Pyle St. ## 2101-2119 (revised from 1942), 1946
7 19 Construction - Specifications for eight six-room houses on N. Bancroft ## 100-114, built for DuPont employees, and lease negotiations, 1946-1947 [The number of eight houses turned into 50 houses.]
7 20 Supplies needed for the construction of 24 garages on Pyle Street, 1952
7 21 Construction of houses - Lumber lists, 1953
7 22 Construction - Specifications for unidentified structures, 1960
7 23 Construction - Specifications for six houses and 13 garages on Grant Avenue, 1960-1961
7 24 Construction of houses - Annual reports from companies which bid on jobs, 1962
Roll
M Construction - Plans for the house of Eugene DiSabitino at 16th Street & Bancroft Parkway [Shelf JJ 15 A]
Roll
N Construction - Map of Wilmington, color-coded for Wilmington Public Schools, 1963
Box Folder
7 25 Renovations to "Flats" houses and garages, including overhead doors, plumbing and heating, excavating, masonry, tile, and concrete work, 1931
Oversize
7 "Flats" - Specifications for garages and warehouse at 6th and Ferris Streets, 1931
Roll
G, K "Flats" - Plans for additions to warehouse and garages on Ferris St. between 6th & 7th Sts [Shelf JJ 15 A, JJ 14 B], 1931
Drawer Folder
MD-110 4 "Flats" - Plans for additions to warehouse and garages on Ferris St. between 6th & 7th Sts, 1931
Box Folder
7 26 "Flats" - Alterations to 2104 W. 4th Street, and 434 N. Bancroft Parkway, 1933
Oversize
8 "Flats" - Electric light wiring in the house between 4th & 7th Streets, between Union and Ferris
Box
OS 17 "Flats" - Proposed alterations of 434 North Bancroft, with specifications, 1933
Drawer Folder
MD 110 4 "Flats" - Proposed alterations of 434 North Bancroft, with specifications, 1933
Drawer Folder
MD-110 4 "Flats" - Alterations to 2003 West 4th Street to create two apartments, 1934
Roll
N "Flats" - Plans for the alterations to 2003 West 4th Street [Shelf JJ 15 A]
Roll
O "Flats" - Plans to alter 2103 W. 4th St [Shelf JJ 15 A], 1934
Box Folder
7 28 "Flats" - Alterations to 433 N. Union, 401 Union, 1934-1935
Roll
O "Flats" - Plans to alter plumbing and heating for 433 North Union Street [Shelf JJ 15 A], 1934
Box Folder
7 29 "Flats" - Alterations to houses on Bayard, Springer, Ferris and Bancroft, 1935
7 30 "Flats" - Alterations on 603, 605, 619, 621, Springer, 1935
Roll
O "Flats" - Plans for altering 603 and 605 Springer Street [Shelf JJ 15 A], November 23, 1934
Box Folder
7 31 "Flats" - Snow removal schedule for "Flats" houses, 1935-1939 [two unidentified handwritten notes about plumbing, insulation, kitchen cabinets, and electrical bath receptacles]
7 32 "Flats" - Alterations to houses on Bayard, Springer, and Bancroft, 1936-1956
Roll
L "Flats" - Plans for hot water and heating alterations at 607-609 Springer Street [Shelf JJ 15 A], 1936
Drawer Folder
MD-110 4 "Flats" - Drawing for modernized bath in a typical 6 room house, 1940
MD-110 4 "Flats" - Drawing for revised F.S. profile of a decorative urn, 1940
Box Folder
7 33 "Flats" - Renovations to houses on Grant Avenue, Bancroft Parkway, 2201 W. 11th St. and Pyle Street Garages, and 601 Bancroft Parkway, 1940-1952
Drawer Folder
MD-110 4 "Flats" - Drawings of proposed alterations to 400 N. Bancroft Pkwy, 1955
MD-110 4 "Flats" - Drawings for proposed alterations to 635 Springer St, 1956
MD-110 4 "Flats" - Drawings of proposed kitchen and bath alterations, 400 E. 12th St, 1956
Box
OS 5 "Flats" - Photo collage of "Exchange Possibilities" at 618 E. 11th Street, and vacant lot at Kirkwood and E. 11th Street, 11/2001 [Pictorial Collections, Accession 2010.276]
Box Folder
7 34 "Flats" - Renovations to various properties, including painting, wainscoting, plastering, community clean-up, and other maintenance and renovation projects, 1961-1992
7 35 "Flats" - Delmarva Drawings, 1973 [proposed distribution of electric power to houses on 5th & 6th Sts. between Ferris & Bayard Sts]
7 36 "Flats" - Delmarva Drawings, 1973 [proposed distribution of electric power to houses on 4th & 5th Sts. between Ferris and Bayard]
7 37 "Flats" - Delmarva Drawings, 1973 [proposed distribution of electric power to houses on 5th & 6th Sts. between Bayard and Springer, and on 5th & 6th between Bancroft and Springer]
7 38 "Flats" - Delmarva Drawings, 1973 [proposed distribution of electric power to houses on 6th & 7th Sts. between Bancroft and Springer]
Box
OS 5 "Flats" - Photo collage of "Exchange Possibilities" vacant lot at rear of 900 block of E. 7th Street next to Old Swedes Church, 11/2001; one panoramic photo of 900 block of E. 7th Street, 6/2003 [Pictorial Collections, Accession 2010.276]
Box Folder
7 39 "Flats" - Delmarva Drawings, 1973 [proposed distribution of electric power to houses on 4th & 5th Sts. between Bancroft and Union]
7 40 "Flats" - lead poisoning, 1979
7 41-43 "Flats" - lead poisoning, 1989-1994 [information about the renovation of 916 Union Street and the issue of a lease with Hessler Properties to manage the property]
7 44 "Flats" - Renovations to 301 Union Street, 1994
7 45 "Flats" - Summaries of rehabilitated houses, re-rented or flipped, as well as costs and new rents, 1997-1999
Roll
I Demolition package for 416-418 Sherman Street, Wilmington [Shelf JJ 14 B], 1994
Drawer Folder
MD-109 10 Loose-leaf journal sheets of expenses for all properties, 1916-1944
Box
8 "Flats" - Secretary of the Interior's 10 Standards for Rehabilitating Houses, 1982
8 1 "Flats" - heaters, furnaces and suppliers of heating products, 1917-1970
8 2 "Flats" - Lists of heaters and ranges installed during the 25-year time period, 1922-1965 [including a parts and requirements for installation brochure by Richardson & Boynton Co]
8 3 "Flats" - Information on fuel rationing, 1945-1948
8 4 "Flats" - Lists of houses with modernized bathrooms, 1953-1967
8 5 "Flats" - Requests to Delmarva to inspect heaters recently installed, 1956-1966
8 6 "Flats" - Instructions on installing heaters, humidifiers, kitchen fans, and refrigerators, 1958-1972
8 7 "Flats" - Information on exterminators and electric lighting, 1959
8 8 "Flats" - Bids for installing gas furnaces, 1963-1970
8 9 "Flats" - List and number of modern baths, paneling, bath floors, kitchen floors and roofs installed, 1973-1976
8 10 "Flats" - Tin work painting, house painting, schedules for painting, and materials used for painting, 1914-1993
8 11 Roofing projects for houses in the "Flats," 1925-1970
8 12 "Flats" - Pointing projects by John Palcheski & Sons, 1941-1954
8 13 Lists of addresses which received wallpaper in the "Flats," 1941-1942 1962-1967 1969-1970
8 14 "Flats" - Paint catalogs, 1938
8 15 "Flats" - Paint catalogs, 1947-1951
8 16 "Flats" - Paint catalogs, 1952-1959
8 17 "Flats" - Paint catalogs, 1960
8 18 "Flats" - Paint catalogs, 1964
8 19 "Flats" - Paint catalogs, 1965
8 20 "Flats" - Fencing projects, 1937-1962
8 21 "Flats" - Miscellaneous files on maintenance issues including: plumbing, possession of keys, doors and windows, gas venting for appliances, aluminum shutters, and complaints and clean-ups, 1935-1980
8 22 "Flats" - Accident reports from houses in the "Flats" area, 1942-1971
8 23 "Flats" - Lead paint issues and Jackson v. Wilmington Housing Authority case on lead poisoning., 1986-1996
8 24 "Flats" - Brochures re. tools used by Woodlawn, 1928-1970
8 25 "Flats" - License and Inspection letters of violations of code, and certification of compliance letters, 1973-1975
8 26 "Flats" - License and Inspection letters of violations of code, and certification of compliance letters, 1973
8 27 "Flats" - Check lists of renovations and installations for "Flats" houses, 1980s-1990s
Box
9 William Bancroft's Transit Survey books, 1906-1914 [properties in Wilmington and New Castle County, as well as an instruction book on how to use the Sterling Convertible Wye Level]
Box Folder
10 1-8 Tenants of the houses in the "Flats" area of Wilmington
10 1 "stock sheets," 1905-1942
10 1 Notices to tenants and the creation of a Woodlawn Community Club by William P. Bancroft
10 1 Letter to Woodlawn's tenants about teen loitering and vandalism at the Woodlawn Library, 1925
10 2 News article about the landlord/tenant law, undated [includes a copy of legislation regarding the issue, May 23, 1974]
10 3 Changes in tenants, 1975-1976
10 4 Changes in tenants, reasons for leaving, and requests for payment, 1976
10 5 Changes in tenants, 1977
10 6 "stock sheets," 1979-1984
10 6 News clippings about issues impacting on tenants in general in 1979
10 6 Landlord/Tenant Handbook, 1984
10 7 "stock sheets," 1991-1997 [See Box 5 Folders 18-20 for lists of tenants, addresses and rents during the seven year period]
10 8 "stock sheets," 2000
10 8 A remembrance about life in the "Flats" in the 1930s, by Mr. Sparco
10 8 A job offer for one of the "Flats" tenants, and other incidents relating to tenants
10 9-16 Zoning issues in the "Flats" area, New Castle County, and the State of Delaware
10 9 Sewer Capacity Study for the Rezoning of Concord Pike, sponsored by the Woodlawn Trustees, and performed by Whitman, Requardt & Associates, 1977
10 10 Zoning issues and code amendments for New Castle County and Delaware, 1955-1995
10 11 The Brandywine Planning District Plan, 1985
10 12 Rezoning issues with Lancaster Avenue and the Brandywine Park Condominiums, 623 Ferris St., 1977-1995
10 13 Rezoning issue with a former portion of the Brandywine Country Club, 1989-1991
10 14 Zoning Code of New Castle County, Delaware, pages i-iv, and I-1 through II-48, 1991
10 15 Zoning Code of New Castle County, Delaware, pages III-1 through XII-16, 1991
10 16 Zoning Code of New Castle County, Delaware, pages XIII-1 through XVII-10 and Appendices, 1991
10 17 Wilmington properties - Information on Preservation Delaware and tax credits for rehabilitation of properties, 1998-2001
Box
OS 6 Wilmington properties - original "Flats" looking from the East up 4th Street in Wilmington (1/24/1995); rendering of an unidentified intersection, presumably in Wilmington, DE [Pictorial Collections, Accession 2010.276]; aerial photograph: 30" × 24"; 23 1/4" × 31"
B. Citizens Housing Corporation (CHC), 1925-1960
Scope and Content
This subseries is comprised of records about the beginning of the CHC to provide low-cost housing in Wilmington's African American community. Major investors, financing and all correspondence are included. In addition, there are descriptions of the types of houses owned by the CHC, lists of addresses and rents, financial information, and expenses for maintaining the houses. Information pertaining to repairs and heating of CHC houses, expense ledgers, check stubs, bills collected by Tatnall and Wensing, as well as investment records, shareholders, dividends, tax assessments, City and County tax statements, U.S. tax returns, balance sheets, financial audits for the CHC, and events leading up to Woodlawn's purchase of CHC assets.
Box Folder
11 1 Organization of the CHC, A letter from George A. Rhoads to Emma C. Bancroft noting the creation of the Citizens Housing Corporation, naming the officers and board members, and asking for financial support, specifically for helping the "colored" people of Wilmington, July 1, 1925
11 1 Organization of the CHC, "The Story of Woodlawn," by Theodore S. Beck, 1971 [See Box 1 Folder 3 for a brief history of the beginnings of the CHC]
11 1 Organization of the CHC, Annual premium lists for a fidelity bond on the Board with additions and deductions sheet [Bond document, dated July 1, 1935, is included.]
Roll
L Plans for the Vicone House between DuPont & Scott, between Elm & Linden [Shelf JJ 15 A], 1943
Box Folder
11 2 Correspondence within the CHC, from the files of George A. Rhoads, 1924-1939
11 3-7 Additional incoming correspondence is arranged alphabetically by sender, 1925-1947
11 8-9 CHC correspondence and miscellaneous files, 1949-1960 [Additional CHC correspondence arranged alphabetically]
11 10 CHC correspondence and miscellaneous files, 1938-1998 [Roofing, 1938-1960; Painting, 1947-1969; various repairs, 1957-1964; installation of furnaces, 1967; and descriptions and valuations of CHC houses]
11 11 CHC properties' status of occupancy, 1996-1998
11 Expenses for CHC houses, including payment of capital stock to the Directors, 1925-1960
11 Complete description of the CHC houses, valuations, depreciations, and book values, 1948-1960
11 Check stubs from the National Bank of Delaware, 1925-1931
11 Check stubs from Equitable Trust Company, 1929-1933
11 Check stubs from Security Trust Company, 1931-1938
11 Check stubs from Security Trust Company, 1931-1958
11 Check stubs from Security Trust Company, 1938-1944
11 Check stubs from Security Trust Company, 1944-1951
11 Check stubs from the Bank of Delaware, 1958-1960
Box Folder
12 1-8 Quarterly statements from Tatnall and Wensing Realtors, 1926-1960 [Tatnall and Wensing Realtors were commissioned to collect bills and rents from the CHC tenants, while the Woodlawn Trustees maintained the properties]
12 9-31 Bills collected by Tatnall and Wensing for expenses at the CHC houses, 1925-1949 [arranged by date]
Box Folder
13 1-11 Bills collected by Tatnall and Wensing for expenses at the CHC houses, 1950-1960 [arranged by date]
13 12 List of shareholders, notices about meetings of the shareholders of the CHC, 1935-1960 [includes notices about meeting decisions]
13 13 Book of cancelled stock certificates issued from the beginning of the CHC, 1925-1940
13 14 Book of cancelled stock certificates, 1941-1960
Box Folder
14 1 Tax statements for the City of Wilmington for CHC, 1939-1946
14 2 Tax statements for the City of Wilmington for CHC, 1947-1959
14 3 Tax statements for New Castle County for CHC, 1939-1947
14 4 Tax statements for New Castle County for CHC, 1948-1954
Oversize
9 CHC state tax returns, 1938-1960
Box Folder
14 5 U.S. tax returns for CHC, 1925-1944
14 6 U.S. tax returns for CHC, 1945-1960
14 7 Balance sheets for CHC, 1926-1946, 1949-1958
14 7 Summary of net income from CHC houses, profit in percent of return, 1926-1960
14 7 Assets and valuation of CHC houses, 1959
Oversize
10 CHC dividend records to stockholders, 1928-1959
Box Folder
14 8 Capital stock tax returns for CHC, 1926 1928 1933 1937 1939-1945
14 9 Audit reports for CHC, 1929-1944
14 10 Audit reports for CHC, 1945-1960
14 11 Assessments of CHC houses, 1955
14 12 News articles pertaining to the increased population of African-Americans in Delaware and affordable housing, 1960-1974
14 12 Resolution by CHC to sell their assets to the Woodlawn Trustees, undated
14 12 Proposal for Woodlawn to sell CHC houses, prepared by B. Gary Scott, 8/14/1970
14 12 Handwritten pros and cons for/against selling or keeping the houses, 1960-1974
14 12 Lists of CHC property holdings, 1926-1970
14 12 Improvements and rent studies, February 24, 1971
14 12 List of contacts for East Side housing
14 12 Issue with Licensee and Inspection Department, February 23, 1972
14 12 News articles about Woodlawn's purchase of 6 houses on Walnut Street, February 23, 1974
14 13 Woodlawn's City Delamore Place, 1815-1940 [Delamore Place was built by Col. Samuel B. Davis, ca. 1815. Davis was an army officer who fought in the battles of New Orleans and Lewes, Delaware during the War of 1812. The Bayard House overlooked Wilmington near today's Bayard Junior High School, and is mentioned in William Bancroft's letter, dated August 16, 1893.]
14 13 Woodlawn's City Miller Road property, October 8, 1910
14 13 Woodlawn's City News article about developing the Riverfront, 1979
Box
OS 17 Woodlawn's City Plot dimensions of a corner lot at Shallcross & DuPont Streets, Wilmington, undated
OS 17 Woodlawn's City Survey map of possible site for Alapocas, 1878
OS 17 Woodlawn's City Blue plot plan for William Scott's property, 1887
OS 17 Woodlawn's City Blueprint showing the vertical and horizontal profiles of Delaware Avenue, 1901
OS 17 Woodlawn's City Plan of the curb corners on Greenhill Avenue, between Delaware Avenue & Willard Street, undated
OS 17 Woodlawn's City Plans of curbs and gutters at Willard and Riverview Avenues, undated
OS 17 Woodlawn's City Drawing of curb corners on Greenhill Avenue, 1902
OS 17 Woodlawn's City Plot on north side of Delaware Avenue showing position of old stone house, 1902
OS 17 Woodlawn's City Drawings of tree plantings in Highland Place and Fairfield Place, 1930 1931
Box Folder
14 14 Woodlawn's City Deed and Agreement between the Delaware Land Development Company and William du Pont, Jr. for Westover Hills "C," the language from which may have become a model for Woodlawn's Deeds and Agreements for their development of communities in Brandywine Hundred, 1929
Drawer Folder
MD-109 1 Woodlawn's City Complete set of drawings for the State Motor Vehicle Inspection Lanes at 8th and Bancroft Parkway, 1940
Box Folder
14 15 Woodlawn's City Specifications for the building of Woodlawn's Office Building at 11th Street and Bancroft Parkway, July 21,1939 [includes bills, receipts and bids for construction]
14 16 Woodlawn's City Woodlawn's protest of the use of Bancroft Parkway for a portion of Interstate 9, 1957
Roll
P Woodlawn's City Site plans for the Chandler Funeral Home [Shelf JJ 15 A], 1963
Box Folder
14 17 Woodlawn's City Woodlawn's Curlett Street Renewal Project, 1964-1971
Woodlawn's City Photos of a plan and rendering of McCaulley Court, a city-sponsored housing project; photos of #1101-1109 Pine Street, directly across from McCaulley Court; photo collage of Wesleyan Church at Bancroft Parkway & 8th Street [Pictorial Collections, Accession 2010.276], undated; oversize collage
Box Folder
14 18 Woodlawn's City Richard Chalfant's Super Fine Lane Project, the Container Corporation's abandoned railroad spur, and the issue of connecting Brandywine Park with Alapocas Woods, 1981-1985
Drawer Folder
MD-109 3 Woodlawn's City Deed to Grantors and Container Corporation of America, 1943
Box Folder
14 19 Woodlawn's City Appraisal of Lore School and the acquisition of the school playground, 1983
14 20 Woodlawn's City the renovation of the old Park Theater into an office building, 1999
Oversize
11 Woodlawn's City Multicolored map of Wilmington's downtown development, circa 1980s
Roll
E Woodlawn's City Mechanical plot plans for St. Mary Magdellan Church [Shelf JJ 14 A], 1965
Drawer
MD-110 Woodlawn's City collage of portions of Delamore Place [Pictorial Collections, Accession 2010.276], 1998, 2001 [200 block east side of Delamore, 200 block west side of Delamore; 300 block east side of Delamore, 300 block west side of Delamore; 200 block west side of Delamore in 1998 compared to the same houses following renovations in 2001; houses on East 11th Street: #720-728; #700-718; #618-632] ; photographic collage
MD-110 Woodlawn's City collage of the proposed acquisition of 1020 N. Bancroft Parkway (The Parkway Building) [Pictorial Collections, Accession 2010.276] [acquired in 2000 across the street from 1020 N. Bancroft Parkway] ; photographic collage: 33" × 33"
MD-110 Woodlawn's City collage of city activities [Pictorial Collections, Accession 2010.276], 2001-2002 [includes projects in the Flats/Woodlawn Park; Hill Top-Delamore Place; Christina Gateway] ; photographic collage: 33" × 42 3/4"
C. Brandywine Hundred, 1918-1990
Scope and Content
Believing that Woodlawn had very little open space left in which to develop housing and parks in Wilmington, Bancroft turned to lands in the Brandywine Hundred area of New Castle County in which to invest. Records here indicate that he began to buy farms concurrently with the formation of Woodlawn Trustees, Inc. Included in the records are survey books, descriptions of farms and records indicating that in 1922 he commissioned noted civil engineer, landscape designer, and urban planner Charles W. Leavitt to develop a master plan for future communities and thoroughfares in Brandywine Hundred. This subseries also includes lists of properties purchased, expenses for construction and renovation, and communities later developed by the Woodlawn Trustees from the 1950s through the 1970s: Alapocas, Woodbrook Edenridge, Tavistock and Sharpley. Monies from property sales and rental fees were used to maintain and renovate the low-cost housing originally constructed in Wilmington's "Flats" area. Also contains files about properties in which Woodlawn was interested for purchase, or which had an impact on Woodlawn's lands previously purchased.
The Breger Tract was a special part of Woodlawn's Master Plan to provide financing for their holdings in Wilmington. From 1980 until 1994 Woodlawn battled to secure the land, to secure proper zoning, to secure proper storm and sanitary sewer drainage and to secure the commitment from businesses to help develop Brandywine Hundred along the Concord Pike. Land sales and rents were used to support the "Flats".
The files for the West side of Concord Pike is comprised of files pertaining to the several communities constructed by Woodlawn on the west side of Concord Pike (Rt. 202) beginning with Alapocas in 1938.
Also contains information about additional large up-scale communities built by Woodlawn and farms purchased in Brandywine Hundred some of which were used for purposes other than farming. See Board Meeting Reports for specific years for more information on these communities.
Rockland Paper Mills were constructed circa 1795 by William Young, a bookseller from Philadelphia. It was destroyed by fire in 1814, and it was converted to a cotton mill in 1822. Having burned again in 1846, it was reestablished as a paper mill by Jessup & Moore in 1854 who had earlier built Augustine Mills (the name was taken from Augustus Jessup.) Jessup & Moore was sold in 1940 to the San-Nap-Pak company which produced a paper called Doeskin at Rockland, by which name it was known thereafter. Augustine Mills was much later sold to the Container Company of America. Rockland Mills, as of 2010, had been transformed into the Millrace, a number of upscale condominiums near Rockland Bridge on Rockland Road outside of Wilmington. These files document the attempt to convert the Mills into condominiums, following an effort of the City of Wilmington to annex the sites. New Castle County finally retained the mills as taxable sites. Conversion of the mills to residential buildings changed the adjacent Brandywine Park forever. Although the mills were not acquired by Woodlawn, the Trustees followed the conversion with much interest, due to the impact on Brandywine Park, and the history of their founder's legacy.
Brandywine Town Center is now situated on land once used as Brandywine Raceway on Naamans Road in northern New Castle County, Delaware. The raceway was imploded in 1995, following several years of negotiating with the state to allow gambling at the site. The Town Center became a site for retail shopping and public meeting space. Woodlawn was involved in the development of the space which, as of 2010, was a very popular shopping center, despite much public protest during the development process.
In the fall of 1989, the Woodlawn Trustees wrote a proposal for the development of Woodlawn's lands on the west side of Concord Pike (Route 202) opposite Concord Mall. The plan was to engage in long term leases, rather than sales, to help support the maintenance of Woodlawn's rental properties, and the preservation of open space in Wilmington and New Castle County. The proposal is included here and contains architectural drawings of the proposed mix of commercial buildings and open space. Documents leading up and subsequent to the proposal are included, arranged chronologically. A number of rolled drawings consist of plans for various structures on Concord Pike.
Also contains information about the parks and open space that William Bancroft, the Woodlawn Company and Woodlawn Trustees, Inc. sold or donated to the City of Wilmington, New Castle County and the State of Delaware.
William P. Bancroft believed that Woodlawn and others would eventually develop all of the available space in the City of Woodlawn, and decided to look in the suburbs for additional land for parks, especially the Thompson Farm. Brandywine Hundred was a natural place to look, since Bancroft hoped that the land in Brandywine Hundred could easily be annexed to the city of Wilmington sometime in the future. This folder contains transcripts of Bancroft's thoughts about how open space for park land could be obtained in 1881 by the DuPont Company. See also "Operations and Purpose of Woodlawn" compiled by Phillip G. Rhoads, 1972, enclosed in this folder. Letters from Bancroft suggesting the purchase of additional lands in Brandywine Hundred are also included here. In addition, the sale of the Husband's Place to L. Scott Townsend in 1912 appears at the end of the folder. See Board Minutes in Document Box #1 Folders 15-28, and Document Box #2 Folders 29-36 for additional information about all properties] [See also "Operations and Purpose of Woodlawn" compiled by Phillip G. Rhoads. Letters from Bancroft suggesting the purchase of additional lands in Brandywine Hundred. The sale of the Husband's Place to L. Scott Townsend
Drawer Folder
MD-109 2 Roads of New Castle County, 1820
MD-109 2 Property map of New Castle County between Ramsey Road and Smithsbridge Road on east side of Brandywine Creek, undated
Box Folder
15 1 Transcripts of Bancroft's thoughts about how open space for park land could be obtained in 1881 by the DuPont Company, 1881-1915 [See also "Operations and Purpose of Woodlawn" compiled by Phillip G. Rhoads. Letters from Bancroft suggesting the purchase of additional lands in Brandywine Hundred. The sale of the Husband's Place to L. Scott Townsend]
Drawer Folder
MD-109 2 Map of farms for sale in Concord and Aston Townships, price per acre and number of Acres, 1889
MD-109 2 Map of farms in PA south of Neshaminy Creek in Bucks County, undated
Roll
R Maps of all farms purchased by the Woodlawn Trustees [Shelf JJ 15 B]
Roll
J Map of New Bridge Road, Murphy Road, and Rockland Road with benchmarks [Shelf JJ 14 B], undated
Roll
S Survey map of Joseph Bancroft & Sons and Elliott Tract adjacent to Jessup & Moore Co [Shelf JJ 15 B], 1907
Box
OS 17 Survey map of property about to be conveyed from William Bancroft to Alfred I. du Pont, 1910
Roll
Q Topographical map of a portion of New Castle County with bench marks, 53-73, 1914 (also in Rolled Drawings J) from PA line south past Beaver Valley & Ramsey Road [Shelf JJ 15 B]
Roll
T Topographical map of a portion of Brandywine Hundred, 1914, with revisions in 1915, 1934, and 1959. Farms are named. [Shelf JJ 15 B]
Box Folder
15 2 Transcripts of correspondence between William P. Bancroft and Charles W. Leavitt (urban planner and landscape designer), 1915-1919 [Bancroft invited Leavitt to propose a plan for the development of roads and parks, for Wilmington and roads, parks and communities for Brandywine Hundred]
Oversize
12 Drawing of Woodlawn's subdivision of suburban Wilmington West side 202, 1916
12 Leavitt's Report to Bancroft, with a map
12 Transcripts of letters to Directors of Woodlawn from Bancroft explaining his vision for financing acquisitions of lands in Brandywine Hundred, June 24, 1919
Roll
MM Leavitt's 1916-1917 original layout of roads for Brandywine Hundred, in three pieces [Shelf KK 10 A]
Drawer Folder
MD-109 1 Notes on the Twadell Farm, undated
MD-109 1 Drawing of a Thoroughfare Plan for parks and roads in Brandywine Hundred by Charles W. Leavitt, 1928
Roll
MM Drawing of a Thoroughfare Plan for parks and roads in Brandywine Hundred by Charles W. Leavitt [Shelf KK 10 A], 1928
Drawer Folder
MD-110 2 Early plan for Woodlawn's development of northern New Castle County, 1929
Drawer Folder
MD-109 3 Farm lots between Brandywine Creek and Concord Pike, undated; 4 copies
Roll
MM Leavitt Plan revised in 1946 for development of Brandywine Hundred. (Also in Rolled Drawings K along with Leavitt Plan revised for 1946, and Whitman plan of 1973) [Shelf KK 10 A]
Roll
JJ Detailed map of New Castle County farm properties [Shelf KK 10 A], undated
JJ Maps of New Castle County, 1964 and Northern New Castle County, 1981 [Shelf KK 10 A]
Box Folder
15 3 Properties in New Castle County in which Woodlawn had an interest for future purchase, 1722-1919 [Includes the Meany Farm, the Whittaker Place, Spahn Place, Hicklin Place, Ziegler Place, the Eber Y. Talley Place, and others. There is extensive information about the Hicklen House and a brief history of lands purchased in New Castle County shortly after Penn grants]
Drawer Folder
MD-109 3 Map of farm lots between Beaver Valley Road and Ramsey Road, undated [Galbraith, Highfield, Twaddell, Hendrick, Leech, Spahn, Kellam, Whittaker, L. Talley, Chandler, E.D. Talley]
Oversize
13 Hicklen wills and Hinkson deed
Roll
S Blueprint sketch of the Talley Farms between Brandywine Creek at Smiths Bridge on the West along the PA line going East, into Delaware County, PA [Shelf JJ 15 B]
Box
OS 1 Large photo of the Talley Farm [Pictorial Collections, Accession 2010.276], undated
Box
OS 17 Survey drawing of E.D. Talley Farm and J. Heyburn Talley Farm, an exchange of farms along Beaver Valley Road, 1904
OS 17 Plans of plots exchanged between William Bancroft and Carrie Pierce, 1907
OS 17 Survey map of Forbes Estate about to be conveyed to William Bancroft, 1907
OS 17 Drawing of Monigle, Carney and L.E. Carpenter Tracts, 1907
OS 17 Drawing of Survey of Hugh Ramsey's Farm, 1907, indicating that it was transferred to Ramsey by John Palmer in 1894
OS 17 Survey map of Leech Farm, 1908
OS 17 Blueprint and photogravure of Beaver Valley in DE and PA showing farms owned by Leech, Perkins & Twadell, 1911
Roll
CC, FF Tracings of a topographical map of a portion of New Castle County [Shelves JJ 16 A-B], 1914
Roll
HH Topographical map of Brandywine Hundred from Talleyville to Thompson's Bridge, including benchmarks [Shelf JJ 16 B], 1914
HH Negative of a topographical map of Ramsey Road and PA line, including benchmarks [Shelf JJ 16 B], undated
Roll
FF Two topographical maps of northern New Castle County showing a survey and wooded areas [Shelf JJ 16 B], undated
Roll
GG Two maps showing survey measurements and wooded areas from Thompson's Bridge to PA line [Shelf JJ 16 B], undated
Box
OS 17 Plot plan of Sarah Moore's farm, undated
OS 17 Farms between the Day and Husbands Farms south of Talleyville, north to the PA line, undated
OS 17 Farm plots in northern New Castle County, undated
OS 17 Survey map of the intersection of Church Lane and Mt. Salem Lane near Mt. Salem Church, undated
OS 17 Plot drawing for John Saunders farm, bounded by Wissahickon Creek and Plymouth Road, undated
OS 17 Photograph of a map of New Castle County, DE and Chester County, PA showing preliminary surveys for the Wilmington & Brandywine Railroad, undated
Roll
FF-GG Map of farms along Murphy & Rockland Roads and New Bridge Road with benchmarks [Shelf JJ 16 B], undated
Box Folder
15 4 John Talley Farm, Alfred I. duPont School, Hill Girt Farm in Chadds Ford, PA, Wilmington Waterfront, Mario Capano's issue with his building permit, research on the Derrickson Farm, Beaver Valley Road in Pennsylvania, and the Brook Lane Property in Glen Mills, Pennsylvania, 1920-1995
Oversize
14 Sale of property from Woodlawn to DuPont Company, 1947 1948
Roll
CC Tracings of topographical maps of northwest New Castle County between Brandywine Creek & Concord Pike [Shelf JJ 16 A], undated
Roll
LL Maps of the scheme for major highways and open spaces for the Philadelphia region [Shelf KK 10 A], 1930 1931
Box
OS 17 Drawing of a plot plan for alternations to a house near Talleyville, DE, owned by Woodlawn, 1936
Roll
U Transparency of white line drawing of the tentative plan of development of Woodlawn's Brandywine Hundred lands [Shelf JJ 16 B], 1946
Roll
AA Lot of land Woodlawn sold to the DuPont Company [Shelf JJ 16 A], 1946
AA Drawing of the master plan layout for Woodlawn's development of Brandywine Hundred, as revised from Leavitt's 1928 plan [Shelf JJ 16 A], 1946
Roll
AA, E Lenderman Farm potential layout for residential development in Woodlawn's Pennsylvania lands [Shelf JJ 14 A, 16 A], 1950
Roll
HH Map of the Lenderman & Bird/Malone Farms in Pa. [Shelf JJ 16 B], undated
Roll
BB Survey of Woodlawn's lands in PA showing Garrett, Lenderman, and Bird/Malone Farms [Shelf JJ 16 A], 1950
Box Folder
15 5 Information on various other properties in Brandywine Hundred, 1931-1972 [Including specifications for the renovation of the Leach House; alterations to the Hendricks House and the Talley House; plumbing specifications for remodeling the 8-square school in Brandywine Hundred; information about the Bird/Malone Farm; land purchases and offers (1947-1968) in Brandywine Hundred; Map BH tenants (1950)]
Oversize
15 Alterations to the Hendricks' farm house, undated
Roll
C Tracing of the lands along Murphy & Rockland Roads, properties of Winant, Charles Day, Howard Wilson, Alfred du Pont, William du Pont, and Woodlawn with 11 benchmarks [Shelf JJ 14 A], undated
Roll
U Survey map of the Bird/Malone, and Linton Stone Farms [Shelf JJ 15 B], 1950
U All farms west of Concord Pike from PA line down to Rockland and Murphy Roads in south [Shelf JJ 15 B], undated
Roll
R, I Maps (seven) of Woodlawn's farms in PA and DE [Shelf JJ 15 B, 16 B], 1960
Roll
T Topographical map of Brandywine Hundred, DE [Shelf JJ 15 B], 1960 [With revisions in 1968, and another with revisions in 1969 to show Woodlawn's properties with boundary lines; See Board Meetings in Box 1, Folders 15-28 and Document Box #1, Folders 29-36 for more information about all properties]
Box Folder
15 6 Right-Of-Way across the land of H.J. Michel, Wynnewood, PA, 1958-1962
15 7 Suburban Development Regulations, 1968
15 7 Properties needed to complete Woodlawn's Master Plan, 1968
15 7 Master Plan # 2, by Whitman, Requardt and Associates, 1973
15 8 Right-Of-Way across the Tri-State Conservancy lands, 1968-1970
15 9 Property sold to the Fulenwiders, 1978
Oversize
16 Sale to the Fulenwiders Part II, 1978
Oversize
17 Sophie du Pont's sale of an easement to Brandywine Conservancy, 1979
Box Folder
15 10 Appraisal and correspondence for the Franklin Baker property, 1982
Oversize
18 Deed and papers for Your House, Inc. on Concord Pike, 1982
Box Folder
15 11 Additional properties of interest to Woodlawn, 1983-1993
15 12 Information on the Blue Ball property, 1985-1990
Oversize
19 Brandywine Commons, easement and maintenance agreement, 1990
Box Folder
15 13 Woodlawn's interest in the Day Property, Reading RR ROW, Property on 202 N. of Bowling Alley, and the Wilmington & Northern RR ROW, 1985-1991
Drawer Folder
MD-109 8 Survey map of the Day property
Box Folder
OS 18 2 Notes on the equipment sale at the Day property
Box Folder
15 14 Information by correspondence and news clippings, about Louis Capano's proposed shopping mall on the site of Fairway Park, formerly the Brandywine Country Club, 1987-1991
15 15 Breger Tract, 1973-1974
15 16 Breger Tract, 1980 September 22-1989 May 10
15 17 Breger Tract, 1987-1992
15 18 Breger Tract, 1987
15 19 Breger Tract, 1989 June 14-1990 August 1
15 20 Breger Tract, 1991 January 24-1992 December 19
15 21 Breger Tract, 1993 January 1-1994 October 10
15 21 Breger Tract - Copy of "William Bancroft: Objects not Achieved, Opportunities Lost," 1990
Drawer Folder
MD-109 3 West side of Concord Pike - General layout of Alapocas Development, 1936
MD-109 3 West side of Concord Pike - Plan of Alapocas, 1943; 2 copies
MD-109 3 West side of Concord Pike - Blue drawing of proposed grading for Alapocas Development, 1944
MD-109 3 West side of Concord Pike - Final plat map of Alapocas, 1945
MD-109 3 West side of Concord Pike - Revision of lot lines, Block C in Alapocas, 1955 [See Board Meetings in Box 1, Folders 15-28, and Folders 29-36 in Document Box #1 for more information about all communities and properties]
Box Folder
16 1 West side of Concord Pike - Alapocas [Including a copy of the deed, deed history, and plot maps of the community. See Box 17, Folder 4 for a history of the Farm House at Friends School in Alapocas]
16 1 West side of Concord Pike - Information regarding the Alapocas Quarry, with issues about its development, 1994-1996
Roll
CC West side of Concord Pike - Tracings of Alapocas, showing dimensions of lots and roads, including Friends School [Shelf JJ 16 A], undated
Box
OS 17 West side of Concord Pike - Drawing of the land between the B & O Railroad and Alapocas Woods and between Brandywine Creek and Concord Pike, 1915
OS 17 West side of Concord Pike - Drawing of Plan 9 for a development at the corner of Garden of Eden Road and Concord Pike, undated
Roll
KK West side of Concord Pike - Alapocas sewer plan [Shelf KK 10 A], 1939
Roll
E West side of Concord Pike - Topographical drawing of Alapocas and a portion of New Castle County [Shelf JJ 14 A], undated
Box Folder
16 2 West side of Concord Pike - Woodbrook, including final plat maps, maps of tree plantings, cost per lot, and proposed selling price, 1952-1964
Roll
AA West side of Concord Pike - Plot plan for two parcels of land traded by the DuPont Company to Woodlawn for developing Woodbrook [Shelf JJ 16 A], 1946
Box Folder
16 3-17 West side of Concord Pike - Sales agreements for those who bought houses in Woodbrook, arranged alphabetically by names of purchasers, 1952-1964 [Sales agreements for those who bought houses in Woodbrook, arranged alphabetically by names of purchasers]
Drawer Folder
MD-109 9 West side of Concord Pike - Woodbrook final street and lot plans, August 19, 1959
Drawer Folder
MD-110 2 West side of Concord Pike - Tracings of plans and profiles of Waycross Road, Foulkstone Road, Stafford Road, Country Club Drive, Cornwall Road, Cranebrook Road in Woodbrook II, undated
Roll
DD West side of Concord Pike - Preliminary street and lot plan of a future Woodbrook-type of development [Shelf JJ 16 A], 1962 1963
Roll
C West side of Concord Pike - Color-coded map of New Castle County [Shelf JJ 14 A], 1964
Box Folder
16 18 Tenants No Longer Interested In Brandywine Hundred - Acree-Kendrick
16 19 Tenants No Longer Interested In Brandywine Hundred - Lamb-Young
16 20 Waiting lists for homes in Brandywine Hundred with names crossed off when tenants moved, 1973-1978
Box Folder
17 1 Large up-scale communities - Sharpley, including maps agreement with restrictions, cost of lots, 1956
Roll
T Large up-scale communities - Official street and road plan for Sharpley [Shelf JJ 15 B], 1955
Roll
J Large up-scale communities - Plan and profile for Brocton Road, Cranebrook Road in Sharpley [Shelf JJ 14 B], 1957
Roll
F Large up-scale communities - Water mains in Sharpley [Shelf JJ 14 B], 1958
F Large up-scale communities - Sewer plans in Sharpley [Shelf JJ 14 B], 1961
Drawer Folder
MD-109 9 Large up-scale communities - Final street and lot plans for Sharpley, May 14, 1962
MD-109 9 Large up-scale communities - Deed restrictions deemed unenforceable, 1971
Oversize
20 Large up-scale communities - Records for the sale of land to the YMCA, Brandywine Branch, 1962-1964
Box Folder
17 2 Large up-scale communities - Edenridge which offered 1,038 lots for sale, 1963-1974
Drawer Folder
MD-109 9 Large up-scale communities - Final Street & Lot Plans, 3/12/1964
Roll
T Large up-scale communities - Preliminary street and lot plans for Edenridge [Shelf JJ 15 B], 1963
Roll
KK, N Site plans for Pilot School, Garden of Eden Road [Shelf JJ 15 A, KK 10 A], 1964
Roll
O Plans for the caretaker's house at Pilot School [Shelf JJ 15 A], undated
O Plot plan and survey for the site of Pilot School [Shelf JJ 15 A], undated
Roll
F Pilot School - Construction plans for Garden of Eden Road [Shelf JJ 14 B], 1965
Box Folder
17 3 Pilot School - Tavistock including maps, cost of lots, approved contractors, 1967-1971
Drawer Folder
MD-109 9 Pilot School - Block map subdivision plan for Tavistock I, February 21, 1968
Roll
T Pilot School - Preliminary street and lot plans for Tavistock [Shelf JJ 15 B], 1963
Box Folder
17 3a Pilot School - Contains a list of all residential buildings owned by Woodlawn in Wilmington and in New Castle County with a top-sheet summary of the proceeds from sales of properties recorded annually, 1902-1966 [inclues a list of all farms purchased by Woodlawn, number of acres for each and cost, undated]
17 4 Evidence of Friends School in the City of Wilmington at 5th & West Streets, 1750-1982 [shown by plans for the School's gymnasium; includes specifications for labor and materials]
Box
OS 17 Drawing of a section of the retaining wall at Friends School in Wilmington, 1910
Box
OS 19 Plans for a retaining wall on Ball Alley for Friends School in Wilmington, 1911
Roll
S Plans for a retaining wall on Ball Alley for Friends School in Wilmington [Shelf JJ 15 B], 1911
Box
OS 17 Front elevation and floor plan for Friends School at corner of 4th Street and Ball Alley, 1912
OS 17 The Friends School Farm House at the School in Alapocas became the home of the headmaster, March 1937 [The house was called the Elliot/Mousley House, named for the first two owners of record just prior to its acquisition by William Bancroft.]
OS 17 Friends School - Survey map of the Mousley Farm, 1906
OS 17 Friends School - Survey map of Mousley-Elliott Place between Jessup & Moore and Alfred I. du Pont properties, 1919
Drawer Folder
MD-110 2 Friends School - Tracing of a topographical map of the Mousley/Elliott Place, 1930
MD-110 2 Woodlawn's offer to sell part of the Mousley farm to the Wilmington based Friends School to support the moving of the school to Alapocas
Drawer Folder
MD-109 2 Plan of Alapocas surrounding Friends School, with numbered lots along Granite Road, Alapocas Drive, Lenox Place, School Road, Norris Road, Somerset Road, Oxford Place, Edgewood Road, undated
Oversize
21 Deed searches for Friends School in Alapocas, 1943-1972
21 Correspondence between Friends School and Woodlawn regarding the request of the Y.M.C.A to use part of the school's campus for day camp activities, 1947-1948
Box Folder
17 5 Friends School's possible sale of their land below the school for the purpose of increasing their endowment, 1982-1986 [Woodlawn requested a right of first refusal to buy the land. There is additional information about a right-of-way granted by Augustine Mills to Friends School for an easement across Augustine's land. There is also information about Jessup Road included, on the path of which the easement was requested]
Drawer Folder
MD-109 3 Friends School - Plan for Jessup & Moore Co. on Brandywine Creek
Oversize
22 Friends School - Priscilla Thompson's research on Jessup Road, 1982
Box Folder
17 6 Information and correspondence between Woodlawn and Friends School, 1995-2000 [concerning Woodlawn's participation in the school's Symposia during the five year period]
Roll
C Drawings of Friends lower school entrance [Shelf JJ 14 A], 1970
Box Folder
17 7 Derivation of the word "Lynthwaite" and a brief history of the farm, 1915-1928 [Lynthwaite was formerly called the McAllister Farm.]
17 8 What to do with Lynthwaite?, 1940
17 9 Attempt at rezoning Lynthwaite for the purpose of development, 1976
Oversize
23 Specifications for a house in Lynthwaite, undated
Box Folder
17 10 Louis Capano's drawing of a proposed shopping center which would impact Lynthwaite, 1985
Oversize
24 Proposals to purchase Lynthwaite
Box
OS 18 Ledgers for expenses at Lynthwaite
Drawer Folder
MD-109 1 Survey of the Ramsey farm indicating that it was conveyed by John Palmer in 1894
MD-109 1 Large drawing and analysis of Ramsey Farm, undated
MD-109 1 Ramsey Farm - Survey of lands in Brandywine Hundred by Wills Passmore for Hugh Ramsey, 1908
Box Folder
17 11 Correspondence and telephone conversations between Woodlawn and the Ramsey family, 1983 [regarding Woodlawn's interest in purchasing the Ramsey Farm]
17 12 Purchase of the Ramsey Farm and first proceeds from leasing the farm, 1984-1985 [includes information about Irenee du Pont's land and disposition for future generations]
Roll
F Ramsey Farm - Detention pond west of Concord Pike [Shelf JJ 14 B], 1989
Box Folder
17 13 Purchase of land from Woodlawn by the Jewish Community Center, 1979-1984
Roll
P Plot plan for the Jewish Community Center [Shelf JJ 15 A], undated
Box Folder
17 14 St. Joe Paper Company - Records in this file start in 1936 with evidence of the St. John's River Development Company selling the property to the Almours Securities, Inc., 1936-1985 [William Bancroft inquired in 1910 about this land north of Rockland on the Brandywine. Records in this file start in 1936 with evidence of the St. John's River Development Company selling the property to the Almours Securities, Inc. Both companies were registered in the state of Florida]
17 15 St. Joe Paper Company - Woodlawn's many attempts to purchase the tract, and finally arriving at settlement after 77 years of pursuit, 1987
17 16 Appraisal of the St. Joe Paper Company, 1991; 3 copies
Box
OS 5 Rockland Mills property [Pictorial Collections, Accession 2010.276], undated [including north property line adjacent to St. Joe Property; Rockland Mill Race; caretaker's residence; restored mill building; view of the dam and mill race from the bridge; interior of the warehouse building; remains of the warehouse building; photo collage of Bud Vinton's property at Rockland, including Brandywine Creek at Rockland; view from old canoe club across Brandywine toward Jessup and Moore tract; gatekeeper's house; meadows at Jessup & Moore tract] ; photographic collage
Box Folder
17A 1-15 Transformation of the Rockland mills into condominiums by a developer who eventually declared bankruptcy and sold the property to Woodlawn, 1978-1993 [Woodlawn completed a number of condos, but eventually transferred much of the property to the State of Delaware.]
Box
DC 6 Rockland Mills, 1994-1998
Box Folder
17A 16-24 Transformation of Rockland Mills to residences and park land [Included in Folder 24 is the paper "The Rockland History Project"]
Roll
E Lines and grades plan for "Millrace" at Rockland and Mt. Lebanon Roads [Shelf JJ 14 A], 1994
Oversize
25 Augustine Mills and Bancroft Mills - Deed of land from DuPont Company to Joseph Bancroft & Sons, 1904
Drawer Folder
MD-109 2 Augustine Mills and Bancroft Mills - Drawing of the land of W.C. Carter, bounded by lands of Joseph Bancroft & Sons and James Riddle, undated
Roll
J Map of Augustine Mills, property of Jessup & Moore [Shelf JJ 14 B], 1917
Box
OS 17 Augustine Mills and Bancroft Mills - Survey map of lands late of Jessup & Moore Paper Co., undated
Drawer Folder
MD-109 3 Augustine Mills and Bancroft Mills - Map of Woodlawn land in 1936 bound Alfred du Pont's land and Jessup & Moore Paper Mills
MD-109 3 Augustine Mills and Bancroft Mills - Map of a Right-of-Way for Joseph Bancroft & Sons to Alapocas Road, undated
MD-109 3 Augustine Mills and Bancroft Mills - Map of Joseph Bancroft & Sons, Co. land bounded by City land, the Brandywine, and Alapocas Run, 1939
MD-109 3 Map of Augustine Mills just north of Wilmington, extending north of the race, undated
MD-109 2 Augustine Mills and Bancroft Mills - Drawing of Woodlawn's Brandywine Hundred tenants from Rockland Rd. to PA line, 1949
Box Folder
18 1 Large map of the lands of Joseph Bancroft & Sons, with correspondence relating to the procedure of factoring accounts receivable with the First National Bank of Boston, 1962-1968 [A lease is included, dated June 8, 1962, stating an agreement between Indian Head Mills and Joseph Bancroft & Sons]
Oversize
26 Photographs of the Bancroft Mills, circa 1955-1960
Drawer Folder
MD-109 3 Picture of the carpenter and machine shop for Bancroft Mills, undated
Oversize
27 Drawings of the buildings of Riddle Mills, 1866
27 Brief information on the history of Bancroft Mills, and early discussion of issues pertaining to owners of the property and their effort to clear the way for the conversion
Box Folder
18 2 Indian Head seeks buyer for Bancroft Mills, and the Krapf family's interest and influence on the fate of the mills, 1972-1984
18 3 Augustine Mills and Bancroft Mills - Continuation of owners' unsuccessful efforts to transform the mills into condominiums, and the eventual Chapter 11 proceedings, 1983-1995
Oversize
28 Augustine Mills and Bancroft Mills - Deed searches for Wanamaker property and lower Augustine Cut-off, 1988-1989
Box Folder
18 4 Brandywine Town Center - End of Raceway activities, 9/3/1980-3/9/1990
18 5 Brandywine Town Center - Market study for Raceway, 4/2/1990
18 6 Brandywine Town Center - Rezoning Raceway, & design, 4/11/19-12/14/1990
18 7 Brandywine Town Center - Exploratory Sketch, discussion, 1/3/1991-4/10/1991
18 8 Brandywine Town Center - Suit v. New Castle County, 4/16/1991-9/30/1991
18 8 Brandywine Town Center - Woodlawn's Commercial Property Policy, 1991
18 9 Brandywine Town Center - Traffic Plans, and bus plans, 1/24/1992-7/31/1992
18 10 Brandywine Town Center - Deldot's traffic plan, 8/11/1992-12/17/1992
18 11 Brandywine Town Center - Record Subdivision Plan, 1/25/1993-10/27/1994
18 12 Brandywine Town Center - Beginning of final documents, 11/5/1994-12/29/1994
18 13 Brandywine Town Center - Track imploded, planning, 5/24/1995-11/21/1995
18 14 Brandywine Town Center - Mall sketches and approval, 1/10/1997-7/20/1999
Drawer Folder
MD-109 1 Brandywine Town Center - Map of William Bancroft's land north of Brandywine Creek among adjacent farms, undated
MD-109 1 Brandywine Town Center - Map of unnamed trails, undated
MD-109 1 Brandywine Town Center - Maps and west side of Concord Pike of lands held by Woodlawn, undated [denoting acreage suitable for development, and not suitable]
MD-109 8 Brandywine Town Center - Map copied from an atlas published in 1893, showing Talleyville, north to PA line
MD-109 8 Brandywine Town Center - Map showing lands east of Brandywine Creek (Jessup & Moore) between lands of John Derrickson, south to lands of William Bancroft, north of Garden of Eden Road, 1908; 3 copies
MD-109 8 Brandywine Town Center - Survey map of land conveyed by Francis Petitdemange to William Bancroft, 1908
MD-109 8 Brandywine Town Center - Survey map of lands purchased by William Bancroft from Breger and Passmore, north of Garden of Eden Road, west of Concord Pike, 1909
MD-109 8 Brandywine Town Center - Survey map of John C. Husband's farm bounded by Mt. Lebanon Road in the south to the lands of John Talley, between Talleyville Road in the NW and the lands of William Wilson in the SE, 1910; 3 copies
MD-109 8 Brandywine Town Center - Survey map of a part of the Charles Day farm in Christiana Hundred, 1913
MD-109 8 Brandywine Town Center - Topographical and plot map of the Hornsby farm, between Mt. Lebanon Road and Garden of Eden Road, 1914
MD-109 8 Brandywine Town Center - Survey map of the Breger Tract, west of Concord Pike, 1914
MD-109 8 Brandywine Town Center - Survey map of three tracts of land; two owned by Scott Townsend, and the third by the Woodlawn Company, bounded in the SW by Rockland Road, 1917
MD-109 8 Brandywine Town Center - Survey map of a part of the Woodlawn Trustees' lands west of Concord Pike, 1928
MD-109 8 Brandywine Town Center - Survey map of a part of the Woodlawn Trustees' lands west of Concord Pike, 1929
MD-109 8 Brandywine Town Center - Map of northern New Castle County showing locations of E.I. DuPont de Nemours Company, 1964
MD-109 8 Brandywine Town Center - Plot map of farms north of Talleyville Road to and beyond Thompson's Bridge Road [Including lands of William Bancroft on both sides of Thompson's Bridge Road]
MD-109 8 Brandywine Town Center - Plot map of the Cook estate, bounded by the Day farm and the lands of the Woodlawn Trustees
MD-109 8 Brandywine Town Center - Survey map of the Seltzer farm owned by William du Pont
Drawer Folder
MD-110 2 Brandywine Town Center - Tracing of a topographical map of a portion of Brandywine Hundred, 1914
MD-110 2 Brandywine Town Center - Two copies of a preliminary plan for a portion of Woodlawn lands in north Brandywine Hundred, 1929
MD-110 2 Brandywine Town Center - Three copies of a tentative plan of developing lands in Brandywine Hundred, 1948
Roll
Q Development of the West Side of Concord Pike - Topographical map of a portion of New Castle County Delaware [Shelf JJ 15 B], 1914; poster quality
Drawer Folder
MD-110 2 Development of the West Side of Concord Pike - Topographical map of a portion of New Castle County Delaware [Shelf JJ 15 B], 1914; poster quality
Drawer Folder
MD-109 3 Development of the West Side of Concord Pike - Tracings of lands east of Brandywine Creek; Map of the DuPont Experimental Station and DuPont Country Club, 1908, undated [Traced in 1908 by Mary Passmore from a survey made by Thomas Taylor in 1849. Also contains a map of the DuPont Experimental Station and DuPont Country Club, bounded by Brandywine Creek and New Bridge Road.]
Drawer Folder
MD-110 2 Development of the West Side of Concord Pike - Tentative plan for Woodlawn's development of northern New Castle County, 1948
Oversize
29 Development of the West Side of Concord Pike - Land sales, 1945-1956
Box Folder
19 1 Land on Concord Pike and Whitby Drive that Woodlawn transfered for the Concord Pike Library, 1956 [includes copies of the deed, and correspondence]
19 1 Development of the West Side of Concord Pike - Appraisal of southwest corner of Whitby Drive, 1970
19 1 A request from Thomas C. Marshall to purchase a parcel of land from Woodlawn for the purpose of building a motel on Concord Pike connected to a restaurant which would serve alcohol in a restricted manner, 1959
19 1 Information on the Talleyville/Pike Creek Freeway and I-95 (1967), and proposed Concord Pike By-Pass (1969-1973)
Roll
U Development of the West Side of Concord Pike - 11 sheet plans for the Talleyville Post Office [Shelf JJ 15 B], 1962
Box Folder
19 2 Development of the West Side of Concord Pike - Letters of opposition to the buildings at the Rockland Swim Club, 1969
19 2 Development of the West Side of Concord Pike - Leon Weiner's request to purchase lands from Woodlawn for mid-rise apartments, 1971-1972
19 2 Correspondence about Beth-Shalom Congregation's request for property on Concord Pike, 1972
19 2 A letter from Holiday Inn regarding the sale of 2 1/2 acres of Woodlawn's property adjacent to the motel on Concord Pike, June 15, 1974
19 2 Evidence of an attempt by a developer to build a fashion mall just south of Concord Mall on the west side of Concord Pike, 1973-1974
19 2 Woodlawn unsuccessfully attempted to build a Planned Unit Development (apartments) in a residential neighborhood on the west side of Concord Pike, 1975-1976
19 2 Development of the West Side of Concord Pike - Woodlawn's offer to sell acreage just north of Beaver Valley Road to Miller's Furniture Store, January 16, 1976
19 2 Woodlawn's proposed statement before County Council regarding Woodlawn's plans for developing their lands on Concord Pike, 1976
19 2 Proposal to build a shopping center on Concord Pike from Joseph Mersel, vice-president of S. L. Nusbaum & Co., September 7, 1977
Roll
A Development of the West Side of Concord Pike - Index plan for Clover Store, Strawbridge & Clothier, and Rocky Run Plans [Shelf JJ 14 A], 1974
Roll
BB Two drawings showing all of the developed properties on both sides of Concord Pike from Wilmington city line to north of Concord Mall [Shelf JJ 16 A], undated
Box Folder
19 3 Development of the West Side of Concord Pike - Whitman Requardt's report on providing sewers for Woodlawn's BH properties, 1961
19 3 Sewer Capacity Study for the west side of Concord Pike, 1977
19 3 Zoning issues confronting the Insurance Company of North America (INA) on Concord Pike [Including Priscilla Thompson's notes on INA issues, January 5, 1979]
19 3 Development of the West Side of Concord Pike - Land Lease Study For Office Park Type Development, by Robert Hickman for Woodlawn Trustees, 1980
19 3 Issue pertaining to Beaver Valley Road regarding the widening of Concord Pike, 1982
19 3 Development of the West Side of Concord Pike - News clippings about Bird/Malone farm and Mrs. Rhoads' fans; also about farms' financial losses, 1983-1984
Roll
O Plans for the widening of Concord Pike, including the merchants affected [Shelf JJ 15 A]
Box Folder
19 4 Development of the West Side of Concord Pike - Memo to Newlin Wood from Larry Gherke, real estate executive, regarding land use on Concord Pike, 1983
19 4 Development of the West Side of Concord Pike - Memo from Executive Office of New Castle County to Newlin Wood requesting a meeting to discuss the use of the Brandywine Country Club land as a public park, 1984
19 4 Development of the West Side of Concord Pike - Concord Pike Land Use Study, 1984
19 4 Development of the West Side of Concord Pike - An assessment of the value and potential for developing 38 prime acres at Little Falls Center at Centreville Road and Route 48, undated
Roll
J Development of the West Side of Concord Pike - Highway plan for New Castle County revised from 1964 map in 1985 [Shelf JJ 14 B]
Oversize
30 Development of the West Side of Concord Pike - Drawings of Concord Mall, 1986
Box Folder
19 5 Development of the West Side of Concord Pike - expansion of Concord Mall, 1988-2000
Drawer Folder
MD-109 3 Development of the West Side of Concord Pike - Geological Survey Map north Wilmington, west side of Concord Pike from Wilmington to PA line, from Concord Pike to Centerville; east side of Concord Pike from Governor Prince Blvd. to PA line, from Concord Pike to Marsh Road, 1967; revised photo, 1987
Box Folder
19 6 Development of the West Side of Concord Pike - Woodlawn's proposal for land use on the west side of Concord Pike, 1989 [contains color renderings of commercial buildings, and brief comments about Woodlawn's Master Plan for development (2 copies)]
Box
OS 1 Development of the West Side of Concord Pike - Color coded maps of the Master Plan to develop the west side of Concord Pike [Pictorial Collections, Accession 2010.276], 1989
Oversize
31 Development of the West Side of Concord Pike - Properties purchased in 1997, 1998
Roll
K Development of the West Side of Concord Pike - Leavitt Plan for 1928, Leavitt Plan Revised, 1946 [Shelf JJ 15 A]
K Development of the West Side of Concord Pike - Proposal #1 and Proposal #2 prepared by Whitman & Requardt and Associates [Shelf JJ 15 A], 1943 [See also Box 15, Folder 8 for a list of properties that Woodlawn wished to own to fulfill its Master Plans]
K Development of the West Side of Concord Pike - "In Praise of Sidewalks," The Courier Journal Magazine, Louisville, Kentucky [Shelf JJ 15 A], 1980
Drawer Folder
MD-109 3 Development of the West Side of Concord Pike - Brandywine Planning District Plan, in color, 1985
Box Folder
19 7 Development of the West Side of Concord Pike - Rock Manor Park Prevention Council, 1989
19 7 Development of the West Side of Concord Pike - Hand drawing of lands near Beaver Valley Road, as well as interior plans for unidentified house, May 9, 1989
19 7 Development of the West Side of Concord Pike - Serious concerns about the safety improvements proposed for Mt. Lebanon Road, January 23, 1990
19 7 Development of the West Side of Concord Pike - Concord Pike Area Study, August 1990
19 7 Development of the West Side of Concord Pike - Newspaper article about Talley Farm in suburbia, 1991
19 8 Development of the West Side of Concord Pike - Letter to Delaware Today requesting pictures in the magazine, presumably of the William Young House, September 3, 1991
19 8 Development of the West Side of Concord Pike - Retail sites for sale, 1991 [At the intersection of Routes 13 & 71; properties in the City of Wilmington; the Talley Ho Shopping Center at Naamans Road & Concord Pike; various properties offered by CB Commercial Realty, and six real estate auctions offered by Traiman real estate marketing organization]
19 8 Development of the West Side of Concord Pike - potential site for offices at 100 Rockland Road, Montchanin
19 8 Development of the West Side of Concord Pike - Letter to Joyce C. Conant from Woodlawn to verify her residing at 123 Beaver Valley Road, September 17, 1992
19 8 Development of the West Side of Concord Pike - Proposal by Stoltz Realty for three shopping centers, Shoppes of Graylyn, Concord Pike Village, and Shoppes of Redmill. It was sent to Sigma R/E Investment Co. from Newlin Wood, February 18, 1994. It was sent to Sigma, September 14, 1994
19 8 Development of the West Side of Concord Pike - Woodlawn's lists for property searches, November 10, 1994
19 8A Concord Pike Library, 1992-1994 [The Concord Pike Library committed to moving to a site on Foulk Road east of its then current site in Brandywine Hundred. Folders 8A-C tell the story of the selection of the new site and the building of the new Brandywine Hundred Library]
Roll
D Development of the West Side of Concord Pike - Sewer and water main construction plans for west side of Concord Pike [Shelf JJ 14 A], 1994
D Development of the West Side of Concord Pike - Copy of a newspaper clipping reporting work beginning on McIntosh Inn and Courtyard by Marriott hotels on Concord Pike on property owned by Woodlawn [Shelf JJ 14 A], September 16, 1996
Box
OS 3 Development of the West Side of Concord Pike - Two panoramic photos: a sketch of a shopping mall, and a meadow near Rocky Run [Pictorial Collections, Accession 2010.276]
Box
OS 4 Development of the West Side of Concord Pike - renderings for ranch houses at Rocky Run and Hershey Run [Pictorial Collections, Accession 2010.276]; color, 19" × 26 1/2"; color, 20" × 30"
Roll
Q Development of the West Side of Concord Pike - Survey of land bounded by Smith Bridge Road and the PA line. Survey performed by Price & Price [Shelf JJ 15 B], January 16, 1950
Roll
L Plans of unidentified properties on Concord Pike south of Talleyville [Shelf JJ 15 A], 1953
Roll
D Map of all properties owned by Woodlawn Trustees on west side of Concord Pike [Shelf JJ 14 A], 1957-1958
Roll
O Plans for the Concord Pike Library [Shelf JJ 15 B], 1957
Roll
N Plans for the First Unitarian Church at Whitby Drive and Concord Pike [Shelf JJ 15 A], 1959
Roll
JJ Development of the West Side of Concord Pike - Topographical map showing Brandywine Hundred, Delaware and Birmingham and Concord Townships in Delaware County, Pennsylvania [Shelf KK 10 A], 1960
Roll
D Plans for Wax Furniture Co. on Concord Pike [Shelf JJ 14 A], 1961
Roll
M Plans for the Carpet & Furniture Mart at 1151 Concord Pike [Shelf JJ 15 A], 1951
M Plans for the Western Exterminating Co. on Concord Pike [Shelf JJ 15 A], 1961
Roll
L Development of the West Side of Concord Pike - Plans for the Whitten, Jr. House on Concord Pike [Shelf JJ 15 A], 1962
Roll
G Foundation and basement of the 3251 Corporation on Concord Pike [Shelf JJ 14 B], 1962
Roll
F Development of the West Side of Concord Pike - Bridge replacements on Beaver Valley and Sharpley Roads [Shelf JJ 14 B], undated
Roll
M Plans for offices and stores of R.W. Farirbrother, Inc. at Concord Pike & Silverside Road [Shelf JJ 15 A], 1964
Roll
G Construction of Artcraft Electric Company at Concord Pike and Silverside Road [Shelf JJ 14 B], 1967
Roll
D Development of the West Side of Concord Pike - Pilot School alterations [Shelf JJ 14 A], 1969
Roll
E Drawings of the construction of Concord Pike between Foulk and Silverside Roads [Shelf JJ 14 A], 1969
Roll
B Concord Pike widening (1958) and an aerial view of Concord Pike (1968) [Shelf JJ 14 A]
Roll
KK Concord Pike Highway Plans (2) [Shelf KK 10 A], 1972
Roll
C Development of the West Side of Concord Pike - Phase III. Strawbridge & Clothier; Clover site plans [Shelf JJ 14 A], 1974
Roll
G Development of the West Side of Concord Pike - Clover Store's Record of Subdivision Plan, Layout and Utility Plan [Shelf JJ 14 B], 1994
G Development of the West Side of Concord Pike - Site plan for Brandywine Commons III [Shelf JJ 14 B], 1994
G Development of the West Side of Concord Pike - Site plan for INA (Cigna) property [Shelf JJ 14 B], 1994
Box
OS 2 Development of the West Side of Concord Pike - "Country Views" [Pictorial Collections, Acc. 2010.276], 2001-2002 [includes the Delaware Corporate Center on 202; new trees on Beaver Valley Road; rebuilt Derrickson Barn on Beaver Valley Road, PA; open fields between Rocky Run Village and the Jewish Community Center; new trees behind the Homewood Suites; refurbished duplex on Watkins Avenue, PA; Southwest corner of Naamans Road and 202; Krapft Farm conservation strips; and E.Y. Talley's rebuilt barn on Rt. 202 near PA line] ; photographic collage: 30" × 42 3/4"
OS 2 Development of the West Side of Concord Pike - Delaware Corporate Center, Cigna Company, Leech Farm House (Beaver Valley Road) [Pictorial Collections, Accession 2010.276]; photographs
Box
OS 6 Development of the West Side of Concord Pike - rendering of Stolz Management area in Bala Cynwyd, PA [Pictorial Collections, Acc. 2010.276]; color, 36" × 24"
D. Parks, 1886-2000
Scope and Content
This subseries contains files pertaining to all parks developed in the City of Wilmington and New Castle County by William P. Bancroft, the Woodlawn Company, and the Woodlawn Trustees. Reports, studies, and research papers are arranged by the date of the report. Additional files are arranged chronologically by date of the correspondence or news clippings.
This subseries includes several reports and lists of the lands transferred to the City of Wilmington for parks beginning with the purchase of Brandywine Park in 1886-1887. There is evidence in Scharf's History of Delaware of an unsuccessful attempt to create a park in Wilmington earlier in 1868, when funds for a park were not a priority. Much information is included on the development of a park system during the subsequent 93 years in the city. Bancroft's creation of the Wilmington Board of Park Commissioners in 1883 is recorded, as well as his subsequent transfer of lands to Wilmington, followed by Woodlawn's later gifts. Also included is Woodlawn's donation in 1981 of 500 acres to the State of Delaware as an addition to the already existing Brandywine Creek State Park. Records are included about the dedication ceremony for BCSP and plans for the development of greenways throughout New Castle County. There are records here also regarding park maintenance, funded by a trust fund in Wilmington created in 1935, and another trust fund for maintaining Brandywine Creek State Park.
An account of William Bancroft's vision for parks precedes Box 19, Folder 9.
Box 19 Folders 17-21 have been transferred to Document Box # 7.
Note to Researchers: Board Minutes contain additional discussions regarding most properties. Minutes are arranged chronologically in Box 1, Folders 17-42.
Drawer Folder
MD-109 2 Copies of parts of deeds and blue drawing of property donated to Wilmington by William and Samuel Bancroft and their wives to be used as a public park, September 28, 1989
MD-109 2 Pencil copy of the deed to the City from Bancroft conveying land for a park, 1893
Box Folder
19 9 Thompson, Priscilla M. Development of a Public Park In Wilmington Brandywine Park, Kentmere Parkway and Rockford Park before 1896. Wilmington, DE: Woodlawn Trustees, December 12, 1976 [Frederick Law Olmstead, D.J. Menton, William M. Canby and William Bancroft and their impact on the parks of Wilmington]
19 9 Thompson's notes on Parks excerpted from Board Minutes, 1957-1969
19 9 Thompson's notes on a connector between Brandywine Park and Alapocas Park, 1980s
19 9 Thompson's notes on Woodlawn's transfer of lands to the state, 1985
Box
OS 16 Bancroft genealogy, 1910; 2 copies
OS 16 William Bancroft's plan for the western part of Wilmington, 1911; color drawing
OS 16 Footbridge-connector for 2 parts of Bancroft Parkway, 1903 May; color drawing
OS 16 Wilmington's Every Evening newspaper article on William Bancroft and the park system in the city, October 28, 1926
OS 16 New Greenway along Adams Dam Road and Rockland Road, undated; sketch: glossy, color coded
OS 16 Newspaper article "Woodlawn Trustees Keep The Faith" depicting Woodlawn's developments and park land, color coded, November 19, 1989
OS 16 Trails, Woodlawn property, state/county park land, leased home sites, leased cropland, other private owners, parking lots between Concord Pike & Brandywine Creek and between Rockland & Smiths Bridge Road; map: color coded
OS 16 Green shaded park areas between the Delaware River & Brandywine Creek State Park, between Canby Park & Fox Point Park, undated
OS 16 Paths, trails, bridle paths, and picnic places in Brandywine & Rockford Parks and Alapocas Woods, 1934; sketch
OS 16 Maps of Delaware County, PA; hand drawn sketches of land along the Philadelphia & Baltimore Central Railroad, Aston Twp. PA; Nashaminy Creek & West Grove, PA.; Chester County; White Clay Creek & Delaware shore line. 1749 glossy map of Delaware, New Jersey and New York, created by act of Parliament
Box Folder
19 10 Du Pont, Elizabeth N. Delaware Trees. Chadds Ford, PA: Brandywine Conservancy, 1977
19 10 Caulk, Elizabeth, T. ed. Delaware Conservationist. Dover: Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control, Winter 1977-1978
19 10 Delaware Nature Education Society. Natural Areas Preservation. Hockessin, DE. DNES, 1978-1979
19 10 Delaware Division of Parks and Recreation. State Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plan. Dover: Delaware Division of Parks and Recreation, 1979
19 10 Delaware Nature Education Society. Preserving Delaware's Natural Areas. Hockessin, DE. DNES, 1980
19 10 Delaware Department of Natural Resources. Delaware Resource Conservation Plan. Dover: Delaware Department of Natural Resources, 1980-1985
19 10 Delaware Nature Education Society Delaware Nature Education Society NEWS. Hockessin, DE. DNES, 1980
19 11 Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control. Delaware Conservationist. Dover: DNREC, vol. xxiv, no. 1, 1981
19 11 Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control. Delaware Conservationist. Dover: DNREC, vol. xxiv, no. 4, 1981
19 11 Priscilla M. Thompson. Gifts and Sales of Parks To the City of Wilmington by William P. Bancroft 1886-1919. Wilmington, DE. Woodlawn Trustees, 1982 [includes maps, annotations about all parks and open space gifted to the City of Wilmington, as well as lands transferred to the State of Delaware]
19 12 Johnson, Andrew L. and Michael C. Clarke. The Use and Protection of Privately Held Natural Lands. Philadelphia: Natural Lands Trust, 1982
19 12 Fleming, Lorraine M. Delaware's Outstanding Natural Areas and Their Preservation. Hockessin, DE: Delaware Nature Education Society, 1972
19 12 Donnelly, Kevin C. Timber Management Report for the Woodlawn Trustees' Properties in Northern Delaware. Dover: Delaware department of Agriculture, 1983
19 12 Delaware Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control. Greenspace for Delaware's Future. Dover: DNREC, 1990 [accompanied by copies of two pieces of legislation regarding Delaware's Greenspace Program]
19 12 Blume, Cara Lee and Cherie A. Clark et.al. Cultural Resources Management Plan For Brandywine Creek State Park. Dover: Delaware Division of Parks and Recreation, 1990
19 13 Records at Woodlawn pertaining to the relationship between William Bancroft and Frederick Law Olmstead, 1993 [In September 1993 Newlin Wood, Executive Vice-President of Woodlawn, wrote a memo to Stephen Clark reporting a request from Menke & Menke Architects for any records at Woodlawn pertaining to the relationship between William Bancroft and Frederick Law Olmstead, famous urban planner and landscape designer. This file contains the results of the research.]
19 14 Williams, Lynn. Brandywine and Christina Rivers Task Force Committee Report. Wilmington: Land Acquisition for Preservation, Recreation, and Access, 1993
19 14 Rothstein, David. Small Mammal Surveys of Brandywine and White Clay Creek, DE: Species of Uncertain Status. Dover: Woodlawn Trustees, 1993
19 14 Brandywine Conservancy. Baseline Condition Report Woodlawn Trustees, Inc. Property, Chadds Ford, PA: Woodlawn Trustees, 2005. [includes maps and photographs of select Woodlawn lands]
Box
OS 17 Proposed additions to Brandywine Park, 1909
Box Folder
19 15 William Bancroft's original handwritten notes on meetings of the Board of Park Commissioners
19 15 Bancroft's desire to connect Brandywine Park and Alapocas Woods beginning at the railroad near the Augustine Bridge, June 6, 1919
19 16 William Bancroft's original hand written notes on meetings of the Board of Park Commissioners, 1918-1919
19 17 William Bancroft's original hand written notes on meetings of the Board of Park Commissioners, 1921-1922
19 18 Forty-fourth Annual Report of the Board of Park Commissioners of Wilmington, DE [includes copies of photographs, budget and expenses, names of directors, and notes about each park]
19 18 Notes from the Executive Committee of the Board of Park Commissioners, 1934-1941
19 18 Wilmington Park Trust Fund established in 1935
19 18 Map of Wilmington and Vicinity, Park Drive, and places of interest. Prepared by the Board of Park Commissioners, and distributed by the Delaware Motor Club, 1941
19 18 Deed of Gift for Valley Gardens to the Wilmington Park Trust, 1941
19 18 Letter to Woodlawn from the Society of Natural History of Delaware, January 22, 1945 [regarding a conservation project; includes a questionnaire about harmful conditions of individuals' property which might be corrected by a conservation project]
19 18 Select notes for the Board of Park Commissioners, 1954-1967
19 18 Correspondence about the Green Tree Committee, 1956
19 18 Copy of a letter to George Sargisson, Director of Recreation Promotion & Services, Inc. regarding a greenway along the Brandywine, October 28, 1960
19 18 Excerpt from The Squeeze: Cities without Space regarding William Bancroft and his philanthropy of park lands, 1960
19 18 Information on the State's acquisition of the Wheelright Tract for park land, 1966-1980
19 18 Copies of two bills of legislation which limit the liability of owners of public park lands, 1966
19 18 A History of the Board of Park Commissioners, 1967
Box
OS 16 Color coded map of paths, trails bridle paths, and picnic places in Brandywine and Rockford Parks and Alapocas Woods
Box Folder
19 19 Letter to the State Park Commission of Delaware from Woodlawn informing the state that Woodlawn will offer, without cost to the State, land between Brandywine Creek and Creek Road, extending south from Thompson's Bridge to the line of the St. Joe Paper Company, contingent on the State's acquisition of the St. Joe property, December 8, 1967
19 19 Text for a sign appearing at the beginning of Woodlawn's greenway trails
19 19 Sale of a portion of Canby Park to the Boys Club of Delaware, 1967-1974
19 19 Summary of achievements of Wilmington's Department of Parks and Recreation during the two years since the dissolution of the Board of Parks Commission, 1968-1969 [includes the creation of a Metropolitan Department of Parks and Recreation, combining City and County Parks into one organization]
19 19 Letter to the State Park Commission reiterating the offer of December 8, 1967 regarding a gift of land described above
19 19 Proof of property closings - photographs, newspaper notices, News Journal Invoices, and State Trooper Patrol Reports, 1968-1982
19 20 Legal opinions on the Law of Trespass, 1961-1974
19 20 List of City Parks (1886-1942_, compiles on March 13, 1972 [includes acreage, cost, value with improvements, date of Acquisition, and owner/lessor]
19 20 Newspaper articles on Conservation and Open Space, 1974-1985
19 20 Plan for Woodlawn's transfer of property to Brandywine Creek State Park, February 21, 1974
19 20 Nature Conservancy suggests that Woodlawn create a 501(c) (3) arm for tax exempt foundation for the purpose of conservation, 1977
19 20 Requests from Wilderness Canoe Trips to lease land at Thompson's Bridge for a canoe livery, 1978-1979
19 20 Drafts of the Brandywine Creek State Park Trust and Correspondence, 1979-1980
19 20 Notes on Coopers & Lybrand Meeting with Woodlawn about taxes with regard to transferring land to state for parks
19 20 Information on Ommelanden Regional County Park (not from Woodlawn), 1980
19 21 Information on sources of funds to maintain Valley Garden and Brandywine Creek State Park, January 9, 1980. Memo to Lynn Williams from Philip Rhoads
19 21 Appeal to contact legislators protesting state budget reductions for the parks and recreation division, April 18, 1980
19 21 Delaware Recreation and Parks Society, April 1, 1981
19 21 Magazine article and map of lands transferred by Woodlawn to the state, August 21, 1981
19 21 Dedication ceremony at Brandywine Creek State Park of lands recently transferred to enlarge the park, October 30, 1981
19 21 Information on Gypsy Moth control, 1983
19 21 Security breaches, 1985-1986
19 21 Letter from the U.S. Department of Interior regarding the creation of a Mid-Atlantic River Center to promote conservation of local rivers and watershed areas, February 10, 1986
19 21 initiation of a $20 fee at Thompson's Bridge property, June 1, 1987. Includes photographs of the flooding of Creek Road on February 1, 1982, and a dead deer on unidentified PA property in October 1986, June 1, 1987
19 21 Memo on a visit to Granogue and the Cabin Wood Natural Area by the Delaware Nature Education Center, hosted by Irenee du Pont, June 3, 1988
19 21 News article about "The Rockland Man" who died in Brandywine Creek State Park in 1968 [He was identified in 1989 as an escaped prisoner from a correctional institution in Maryland by the use of fingerprints taken in 1968]
19 21 25th anniversary ceremony for Brandywine Creek State Park, 1965-1990 [The original acreage to start the park was given in 1965.]
19 21 Notes of a meeting to plan procedures for developing the Russell Peterson Wild Life Refuge, and other issues on the development of Wilmington's riverfront, April 20, 1995
19 21 News article about the issue of the City of Wilmington's selling its parks maintenance center to the Wilmington Garden Center, November 4, 1990
19 21 Draft of notes taken by Elke McGinley at a meeting during which the history of the Wilmington Parks Commission was made clear in light of recent events with city parks, May 1, 1991
19 21 Letter to New Castle County Public Works Department from the Natural Heritage Program regarding potential storm run-off problems in the Rocky Run area caused by any expansion of the Concord Mall, June 26, 1991
19 21 Letter to the Natural Heritage Program from the Northern Delaware Greenway Council requesting an evaluation of two tax parcels for possible acquisition, February 28, 1994 [includes maps]
19 21 News article reporting that Lynn Williams would chair the new Open Space Council to oversee the implementation of the Delaware Land Protection Act, June 10, 1994
19 21 Deed and correspondence regarding the transfer of the Carney Run Tract to the State of Delaware for park land, December 29, 1994
19 21 News article reporting that the county supervisor for the design and development of parks proposed a park district for the County's 970 acres of park land, April 27, 1995
Collage and sketches of "Bancroft Parkway-The First Greenway" [Pictorial Collections, Accession 2010.276] [Includes a drawing of the Flats neighborhood with Bancroft Parkway highlighted, a brief history of Bancroft Parkway, a drawing of the Greenways and parks between the Delaware River and Bancroft Parkway from east to west; and parks between Canby Park and Brandywine Creek State Park from south to north; and photos of the remnants of abutments for a stone bridge that was to span the B&O Railroad tracks are also included.] ; 2 copies
Portions of Bancroft Parkway, Wawaset Park, Greenhill Avenue, Adams Street [Pictorial Collections, Accession 2010.276]; photographic collage: 39 1/2 " × 50"
Box Folder
19 22-28 Research notes on "PARKS" provided by Priscilla Thompson for her assignment by Woodlawn [includes information on Frederick Law Olmstead]
Roll
I Time line for Woodlawn's construction and development of communities in Wilmington and Brandywine Hundred, 1901-1991
E. Leases and Deeds, 1889-1981
Scope and Content
This subseries includes deeds written during the period 1862-1915, as well as deed restriction documents for the communities constructed in Brandywine Hundred. The deed restrictions for communities constructed by Woodlawn for 75 years were later suggested by a Woodlawn lawyer to be unenforceable once the properties were sold.
Box
DC 9 Woodlawn's Leases and Deeds to various properties in the City of Wilmington and New Castle County
Oversize
32 Sales agreements, deeds, certificates of title, 1862-1915
Box Folder
DC 9 1 Early deeds, including Rockford and South Brandywine, 1889-1934
Oversize
33 Three indentures of property to railroads, 1889 1909
Box Folder
DC 9 2 Copies of leases, one each year, during this 21-year time period, 1928-1948
DC 9 3 Examples of deed language used in several deeds, and transcripts of extracts from deeds used by the Bancrofts to transfer lands to the City of Wilmington, 1852-1933 [Includes a list of those to whom or from whom property was sold/bought in Wilmington 1904-1933]
DC 9 4 Woodlawn's Building Restrictions, 1932-1981 [includes a settlement sheet for a property, 1944; and examples of deeds, 1944]
Drawer Folder
MD-109 2 Copies of parts of deeds and blue drawing of land donated to Wilmington by William and Samuel Bancroft and their wives to be used as a public park, 1889
III. Financial Records
A. Ledgers and Journals, 1904-1985
Scope and Content
See Box 22, Folder 1 for an accounting manual used by Woodlawn.
Loose leaf and bound ledgers include segments of time between1904-1985 with information about trial balances, rent accounts in the "Flats," the Citizens Housing Corporation, and the Brandywine Hundred farms. In addition, expenses for buildings in each of the three housing areas are part of this subseries. The trustees also kept records of labor distribution per housing cost estimates, general journals for properties in Pennsylvania, and analyses of net profits and quarterly income comparisons.
Volume
1 Trial balances, 1904-1938
Volume
2 Trial balances, 1919-1927
Volume
3 Trial balances, 1939-1957
Volume
4 Trial balances, 1958-1970
Volume
5 Trial balances, 1971-1977
Volume
6 Trial balances, 1978-1984
Volume
7 Trial balances, 1985
Drawer Folder
MD-110 3 City rents ledgers, 1908-1963; loose-leaf
Volume
8 City rents ledgers, 1904-1920
Volume
9 City rents ledgers, 1921-1930
Volume
10 City rents ledgers, 1931-1937
Volume
11 City rents ledgers, 1938-1944
Volume
12 City rents ledgers, 1945-1952
Volume
13 City rents ledgers, 1953-1959
Volume
14 City rents ledgers, 1960-1963
Volume
15 City rents ledgers, 1969-1970
Volume
16 City Rents by Individual Names, 1908-1919
Volume
17 City rents ledgers, 1914-1925
Drawer Folder
MD-110 2 Brandywine Hundred rents, 1931-1934
Volume
18 Brandywine Hundred rents, 1935-1938
Volume
19 Brandywine Hundred rents, 1939-1956
Volume
20 Brandywine Hundred rents, 1946-1956
Box
OS 14 Rents for Flats & garages, 1964-1968
Box
OS 15 Rents for Flats & Garages, 1971-1976
Volume
21 City, Brandywine Hundred & CHC Rents, 1979-1983
Volume
22 City, Brandywine Hundred & CHC Rents, 1985 [includes PA]
Volume
23 Expenses City Houses, undated
Volume
24 Expenses City Houses, undated
Volume
25 Expenses City Houses, undated
Box
OS 15 Balances, Rents, Credits for houses in BH, Flats, and CHC, undated
Box
OS 18 Expenses CHC, 1931-1941; loose-leaf pages
Volume
26 Expenses CHC, 1928-1941
Volume
27 Expenses CHC, undated
Box
OS 18 Expenses Brandywine Hundred Farms, 1912-1930
Volume
28 Expenses Brandywine Hundred Farms, 1935-1974
Volume
29 Expenses Brandywine Hundred Farms, 1954-1966
Volume
30 Cash Disbursements, 1966-1973
Volume
31 Cash Disbursements, 1974-1977
Volume
32 Wages Expenses, 1903-1948
Volume
33 Wages Expenses, 1930-1990
Volume
34 Wages Woodlawn Employees, 1/6/1995-1/13/1995
Box
20 Expense journals, first kept by William Bancroft (until his death), and subsequently by officers of the Woodlawn Company and Woodlawn Trustees, 1901-1955 [include various expenses, from insignificant expenditures to capital stock issues] ; 5 volumes
Box
21 Mortgages, Stocks and Bonds Accounts, 1896-1966 [Citizens Housing Corporation's Capital stock accounts, general expenses, profit/loss accounts and other sundry accounts; Cash Receipts Ledger for 1964-1966; Capital Account Ledger from various accounts] ; 4 volumes
B. Financial Records, Journal Entries, Audits, and Check Stubs, 1896-1995
Scope and Content
Contains handwritten financial records, computer generated journal entries, audits, and check stubs.
In addition to audit reports, there are confirmation letters to banks for the release of account information, Woodlawn's tax information, land transaction lists, quarterly financial reports for select months, and information on tax credits for rehabilitating low-cost housing. Investment Statements and bank statements are included.
Contains files leading to an agreement with Loomis-Sayles & Company to manage Woodlawn's assets, periodically report and monitor investments, and to project future trends.
Box Folder
22 1 Financial records, December 1994-April 1995
22 2 Financial records, May 1995-August 1995
22 3 Financial records, September 1995-December 1995
22 4 General Journal - PENNA, 1/31/1995-1/31/1996
22 5 General Journal, 1995 January 1-1995 December 31
22 6 General Ledger Reports - Job Transaction Details, 1995 January 1-1995 June 30
22 7 General Ledger Reports - Job Transaction Details, 1995 January 1-1995 August 31
22 8 General Ledger Reports - Job Transaction Details, 1995 September 1-1995 October 31
22 9 General Ledger Reports - Job Transaction Details, 1995 November 1-1995 December 31
22 10 Miscellaneous Financial Information - Newlin Wood's notes on pricing post war developments, 4/28/1992 6/1/1992
22 11 Transaction Journal, Woodlawn & PENNA - Cash requirement reports et al., 11/22/1995-1/31/1996
22 12 Transaction Journal, Woodlawn & PENNA - Annual Summaries of Financial Accounts, 1995
22 13 Transaction Journal, Woodlawn & PENNA - Bank Reconciliations, 1995 1996 [loan investment statements, settlement receipts]
22 14 Transaction Journal, Woodlawn & PENNA - Miscellaneous financial records
22 15 Transaction Journal, Woodlawn & PENNA - Miscellaneous invoices, 1971-1980 [cash deposit slips and cash deposit records for tenants, 1972]
22 16 Audits of financial records, income/expense summaries, 1946-1949, 1951-1968
22 17 Audits of financial records, income/expense summaries, 1967-1975
22 18 Audits of financial records, income/expense summaries, 1976, 1977, 1978
22 19 Audits of financial records, income/expense summaries, 1992-1994
22 19 Four books of check stubs from Security Trust, 1922-1928
Box
23 Check stubs from Security Trust, 1926-1929
23 Check stubs from Security Trust, 1928-1929
23 1 Check stubs from Bank of Delaware, 1/3/1995-5/31/1995
23 2 Check Stubs from Bank of Delaware, 6/1/1995-9/29/1995
23 3 Check stubs from Bank of Delaware, 10/2/1995-12/31/1995
Oversize
34 Woodlawn's building expenses, 1908-1960
Box Folder
24 1 Records of stocks, bonds, mutual funds, T-Bills, real estate purchases, mortgages and sales of property, 1945-1955
Oversize
35-37 Information on possible purchases of bonds, 1945-1948
Oversize
38 Woodlawn's annual reports to the State of Delaware, 1954-1960 [prequels to Franchise Tax]
Box Folder
24 2 Equitable Security Trust investment statements for Woodlawn, 1957
24 3 Preliminary documents of proposals from investment planners, 1962
24 4 Lists of Woodlawn's investments, 1953-1962
24 5 A Board Resolution to engage L&S, a statement of Woodlawn's assets in 1958-1965, and a contract for service, 1958-1978 [Reports follow for the years 1962-1978]
24 6 Acknowledgement letters from Bank of Delaware on Woodlawn's Investments, 1962-1965
24 7 Loomis/Sayles reports on investments, 1963-1964
24 8 Loomis/Sayles investment reports and forecasts, 1965
24 9 Loomis/Sayles investment reports and forecasts, 1965-1966
24 10 Bank of Delaware's acknowledgements on investments, 1966-1969 [Loomis/Sayles reports on investments and forecasts, 1967]
24 11 Loomis/Sayles summary of investment position and reports on investments, 1967-1968
24 12 Loomis/Sayles summary on investment position and reports on investments, 1969-1970
24 13 Loomis/Sayles "Changing Financial Environment," December 1970
24 13 "Business Slowdown" Investment Policy decisions, 1970
24 13 Reports on investments, 1970
24 14 Bank of Delaware's acknowledgements of investments, 3/3/1970-12/20/1972
24 14 Loomis/Sayles reports on investments, 1970-1972
24 15 Loomis/Sayles summary on investments position, 2/26/1971-12/29/1972
24 15 Loomis/Sayles reports on investments, 1972
24 16 Loomis/Sayles portfolio reviews, statements for investments and forecasts
24 17 Bank of Delaware's acknowledgements of investments, 1973-1977
24 18 Loomis/Sayles statements for investments and forecasts, 1974
24 18 Loomis/Sayles summary of investment position, 2/28/1973-12/31/1974
24 19 Loomis/Sayles reports on investments and forecasts, 1965-1977
24 19 Investors' planners' statements on investments, 2/28/1975-5/31/1977
24 20 Loomis/Sayles reports on investments and forecasts, 1976-1978
24 21 Woodlawn's Custodial Account, 1989-1990
Oversize
39-40 Woodlawn's principal asset summaries and principal income transactions, 1965-1983
Box Folder
25 1-7 Financial records, including investments, staff benefits, and the financial records of Stephen Clark (long-time president of Woodlawn), 1996 [statements on various Woodlawn investments, including Merrill Lynch, PNC investments, and the Killen Group]
Oversize
41 Woodlawn's investment accounts at Wilmington Trust, 1996
C. Staff Wages and Benefits, 1940-1982
Scope and Content
Included are records for salaries, benefits and labor distribution in select years of employment. The development of a pension plan for employees appears in the form of restatement of the plan to comply with the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1976 (ERISA). Also included is information about staff bonuses, officers' compensation, Delaware's work safety program, labor costs as part of site expenses, and bank statements for pension assets.
Box Folder
25 8 Staff benefits, staff pension, including the first plan, 1952-1976
25 9 Salaries for Woodlawn employees and Board, 1954-1982
25 9 City Head Tax, 1962-1966
25 9 Selected employees vacation benefits forms, 1972-1973
25 9 Workman's Compensation form, 1954-1982
25 10 Pension plan for the employees of Woodlawn Trustees, Inc, 1964-1976 [includes the "Employment Retirement Insurance Security Act of 1974." The plan as partially restated complied with ERISA]
Oversize
42 Wage ratios for general expenses in Brandywine Hundred properties, 1965-1976
Box Folder
25 11 Restated Pension for full compliance with ERISA of 1974, 1976
25 11A Miscellaneous information about various staff benefits
Box
DC 10 How to Use BLR's Employee Compensation in Delaware, Robert L. Brady, J.D. for Business & Legal Reports, Inc, 2001
Box
DC 11 Restatement of Woodlawn's Pension, 1986, and 1990 Valuation Report
D. Stephen Clark's Financial Information, 1971-1993 [CLOSED}
Scope and Content
Long-time Woodlawn Trustees board member Stephen Clark left records of his financial affairs to the owners of the William Bancroft papers. Included are bank statements, trust account statements, tax information, IRA fund statements, and statements from the trust of Sarah Bancroft Clark, the income from which was distributed to Stephen and his siblings and their heirs. Issues with the disbursement of the income from his mother's trust are also reviewed.
Box 26 pertains to the revocation of Woodlawn's tax exemption.
Box Folder
25 12 Financial Management Account # 53019-00-6., 1982-1983
25 13 Financial Management Account # 53019-00-6, 1984
25 14 Financial Management Account # 53019-00-6., 1985
25 15 Financial Management Account # 53019-00-6, 1986-1987
25 16 Financial Management Account # 53019-00-6, 1988
25 17 Financial Management Account # 53019-00-6, and #44-44-001-5301906, 1989
Box Folder
25A 1 Stephen Clark Trust Act. 45 0104 04881 quarterly review, 9/15/1972-1/30/1976
Oversize
43-45 Trust Account Statements, 1971-1982
Box Folder
25A 2-8 Stephen Clark Trust 410-35-00-7, 9/30/1982-9/29/1988
25A 9-11 Stephen Clark Trust Act. 41054-01-6, 10/29/1984-11/15/1989
25A 12-13 Stephen Clark Trust Act. 47-48-001-1158301, 10/31/1989-2/11/1991
25A 14 Stephen Clark Trust Act. 47-48-0012000963, 4/30/1991-12/31/1992
25A 15 Miscellaneous financial documents, 1987 1988 1990
25A 16 Documented contributions, 1985 1987
25A 17 Tax returns, 1977-1979
25A 18 Support documents for 1980 tax returns
25A 19 Stephen & Marianna Clarks' DE tax return 1981; PA Stephen only
25A 20 Support documents for tax year 1981
25A 21 Support documents for tax years 1981, 1982, 1985
25A 22 Stephen & Marianna Clarks' tax returns for 1986
25A 23 Support documents for 1986 tax returns
25A 24 Support documents for 1986 tax returns
Box Folder
26 1 IRA fund information, 1983-1987
26 2 IRA fund information, 1988-1991
26 3 IRA fund information, 1992-1994
26 4 IRA fund information, 1985-1986
26 5 IRA fund information, 1986
Oversize
46 Documents creating the Sarah Bancroft Clark Trust, 1929, including amendments
Oversize
47-50 Sarah B. Clark Trust statements, 1975-1982
Box Folder
26 6 Stephen and Lydia Clarks' issues with the Sarah Bancroft Trust, 1976-1977
26 7 Stephen Clark's issues with the Sarah Bancroft Clark Trust, 1978
26 8 Stephen Clark's issues with the Sarah Bancroft Clark Trust; Audits of Trust, 1980-1982
26 9 Stephen Clark's issues with the Sarah Bancroft Clark Trust, 1980-1982
26 10 Correspondence on the possible changes in the SBC Trust, 1983
26 11 Stephen Clark's issues with the Sarah Bancroft Clark Trust, 1984-1985 [Performance, 1971-1985]
26 12 Stephen Clark's issues with the Sarah Bancroft Clark Trust, 1984-1985
26 13 Correspondence on the issues in the Sarah Bancroft Clark Trust, 1986
26 14 Stephen Clark persuades Nathan Clark to change his will, 1984-1989
IV. Legal Issues
A. Woodlawn's Tax Exemption Revoked, 1963
Scope and Content
In April 1966, the Woodlawn Trustees received a notice from the U.S. Internal Revenue Service stating that Woodlawn owed the IRS $103,466 for back taxes. Woodlawn responded that their Corporation was tax exempt, and would not pay the taxes. A long process ensued to determine Woodlawn's tax status, and finally ended with Woodlawn suing the United States to recover back taxes. The following records begin with the original claim from the IRS and then all of the evidence and exhibits collected by Woodlawn during the hearings and trial.
In 1927 the U.S. Internal Revenue Service determined that Woodlawn was exempt from paying taxes. In 1963 the IRS revoked the tax exemption, declaring that the Trust was violating the Internal Revenue Code of 1954 by receiving revenues from a business unrelated to its original purpose--namely, profits from real estate rentals and sales. The revocation was made retroactive to 1951, with more than $1,000,000 owed to the federal government. This subseries contains lengthy records filed with the IRS about Woodlawn's original mission, proof of prior tax exemptions, testimony of officers of Woodlawn, the company's historical documents proving that Woodlawn's history is one of a philanthropic nature, and finally the decision of the IRS in 1972. Having first paid the amount owed to the IRS and the IRS having decided in Woodlawn's favor in the tax exemption issue, Woodlawn sued the U.S. Government for rebates on their payments and won. However, as a result of the tax law of 1969, a portion of which pertained to restrictions on non-profit institutions, Woodlawn decided to avoid the restrictions which would prohibit the company from doing its work and decided to pay all future taxes. Woodlawn continues to pay taxes today.
Box 27 contains records pertaining to the continuing story of the revocation of Woodlawn's tax exemption, as well as the resulting law suit, Woodlawn Trustees, Inc. v. United States.
Box Folder
26 15 IRS notification that Woodlawn does not fall within the tax provision 501(c)(3), 1966
26 16 1918-1925
26 17 Correspondence leading to a favorable determination, as well as a tax information summary, 1918-1928
26 18 Correspondence prior to 1938 determination, and discussion of tax status in the 1950s, 1938-1958
26 19 Favorable ruling from the IRS regarding the Social Security Tax and Unemployment Tax, 1936-1958
26 20 A copy of all records leading to the revocation of Woodlawn's tax exempt status, and Woodlawn's subsequent suit against the Internal Revenue Service, 1925-1965
26 21 Records regarding the suit against the IRS, 1966-1972
26 22 Woodlawn's decision to pay taxes, due to the impact of the 1969 Tax Bill on non-profit corporations, 1969
Oversize
51-76 Woodlawn Trustees, Inc. v. United States, 1966-1972
Box Folder
26 23 Woodlawn Trustees, Inc. v. United States, 1902-1966
26 24 Woodlawn Trustees, Inc. v. United States, 1901, 1909-1916
26 25 Woodlawn Trustees, Inc. v. United States, 1917-1919
26 26 Woodlawn Trustees, Inc. v. United States, 1920-1926
26 27 Woodlawn Trustees, Inc. v. United States, 1957-1958
26 28 Woodlawn Trustees, Inc. v. United States, 1959, 1964, 1970
26 29 Woodlawn Trustees, Inc. v. United States, 1919-1925
26 30 Woodlawn Trustees, Inc. v. United States, 1923
26 31 Woodlawn Trustees, Inc. v. United States, 1951-1966
26 32 Woodlawn Trustees, Inc. v. United States, 1912-1928
26 33 Woodlawn Trustees, Inc. v. United States, 1923-1926
26 34 Woodlawn Trustees, Inc. v. United States, 1927-1951
26 35 Woodlawn Trustees, Inc. v. United States, 1902-1966
26 36 Woodlawn Trustees, Inc. v. United States, 1967
Box Folder
27 1 Woodlawn Trustees, Inc. v. United States, 1962-1968
27 2 Woodlawn Trustees, Inc. v. United States, 1964-1969
27 3 Woodlawn Trustees, Inc. v. United States, 1960-1961, 1964-1965
27 4 Woodlawn Trustees, Inc. v. United States, 1966-1968
27 5 Woodlawn Trustees, Inc. v. United States, 1963-1964
27 6 Woodlawn Trustees, Inc. v. United States, 1963-1966
27 7 Woodlawn Trustees, Inc. v. United States, 1964-1965
27 8 Woodlawn Trustees, Inc. v. United States, 1965-1966
27 9 Woodlawn Trustees, Inc. v. United States, 1966-1968
27 10 Woodlawn Trustees, Inc. v. United States, 1967
27 11 Woodlawn Trustees, Inc. v. United States, 1968
27 12 Woodlawn Trustees, Inc. v. United States, 1968
27 13 Woodlawn Trustees, Inc. v. United States, 1968
27 14 Woodlawn Trustees, Inc. v. United States, 1968-1969
27 15 Woodlawn Trustees, Inc. v. United States, 1969
27 16 Woodlawn Trustees, Inc. v. United States, 1969
27 17 Woodlawn Trustees, Inc. v. United States, 1969
27 18 Woodlawn Trustees, Inc. v. United States, 1969
27 19 Woodlawn Trustees, Inc. v. United States, 1969
27 20 Woodlawn Trustees, Inc. v. United States, 1969
27 21 Woodlawn Trustees, Inc. v. United States, 1969
27 22 Woodlawn Trustees, Inc. v. United States, 1969
27 23 Woodlawn Trustees, Inc. v. United States, 1969
27 24 Woodlawn Trustees, Inc. v. United States, 1969
27 25 Woodlawn Trustees, Inc. v. United States, 1969
27 26 Woodlawn Trustees, Inc. v. United States, 1969-1970
27 27 Woodlawn Trustees, Inc. v. United States, 1970-1971
27 28 Woodlawn Trustees, Inc. v. United States, 1971-1972
27 29 Woodlawn Trustees, Inc. v. United States, 1971-1972
Box
DC 12 Woodlawn Trustees, Inc. v. United States - Proceedings for Woodlawn Trustees, Inc. v. United States of America, 1969; 4 folders
B. Woodlawn's Housing Policy Challenged, 1963
Scope and Content
Contains files about Woodlawn's housing policy and the need to integrate the "Flats," as well as their properties in New Castle County. In September 1963 the Wilmington Monthly Meeting sent a letter to Philip G. Rhoads and other Woodlawn Trustees who were members of the Monthly Meeting. The letter proclaimed a need to end discrimination in all housing. The Meeting also established an Open Housing Committee, presumably to discuss open housing with the Woodlawn Trustees.
Concurrent with the 1963 revocation of its tax exemption, Woodlawn Trustees, Inc. was challenged by the Wilmington and Philadelphia Friends Meetings to adhere to the original aims and purposes of William Bancroft, claiming that Woodlawn's expansion to residential and commercial real estate activities in Brandywine Hundred was never intended by their founder. The Friends Meeting in Wilmington was also concerned that Woodlawn's housing policy was too restrictive and did not permit integration of African American families with Caucasians in Woodlawn's developed communities. Correspondence, news clippings, minutes of meetings and final agreements with the Delaware Human Relations Commission are included here.
Box Folder
28 1 1928, 1963
28 1 Letter to Mrs. Emma C. Bancroft regarding the need to provide housing for the African American residents of Wilmington, 7/9/1928 [includes an excerpt of Edward Higbee's The Squeeze, an essay about Bancroft's dream of providing housing for working men at a low cost]
Oversize
77-78 1962-1972
77-78 Wilmington Monthly Meeting's challenge to Woodlawn's housing policy
77-78 Letter from Howard H. Starkweather, Jr., Clerk of the Wilmington Monthly Meeting of Friends, to Philip Rhoads about the need to end discrimination in all housing, 9/27/1963
77-78 Interim Report of Committee On Open Housing, by Philip Rhoads, 12/2/1963
77-78 Response from Philip Rhoads to Coleman Dorsey's report about the "drifting" Woodlawn Trustees, 12/9/1963
77-78 Priscilla Thompson's notes on the challenge to Woodlawn's Housing Policy, 1963-1984
Box Folder
28 2 Information regarding the various interpretations of the Civil Right Act of 1968, as well as Delaware's equal rights legislation of 1953 as amended in 1969, 1968-1970 [includes a letter from The State Human Relations Commission, 3/10/1970]
28 3 Woodlawn's consideration of a tract of land to be used for integrating Brandywine Hundred, 1969-1970 [additional correspondence between Woodlawn and the Human Relations Commission; and a report and map of Brandywine Hundred for Master Plan 2, and responses to the new Master Plan]
28 4 2/24/1972-6/30/1972 [The Philadelphia Yearly Meeting of Friends expressed their interest in a report from the Wilmington Monthly meeting which speculated that the current Trustees were drifting from William Bancroft's original goal. In a short time other groups pressed the Trustees to integrate housing. References reported that the State Human Relations Commission formed a three-man committee to investigate Woodlawn's housing policy.]
Oversize
79 Resolution from the City Council of Wilmington regarding Woodlawn's Housing Policy, 5/18/1972
Box Folder
28 5 7/2/1972-7/17/1972
28 5 Pressure on Woodlawn led to agreement with the Human Relations Commission
28 5 "In Depth Study--The Woodlawn Trustees, Inc.," Donald G. Davis (intern at University of Delaware Urban Education), 1972
28 6 Records explaining Woodlawn Trustees' defense against the charge of discrimination, 1969-1973
28 7 1981-1993
28 7 News article, "The 'Flats' is a Model of Integration," 10/26/1981
28 7 A letter from Coopers & Lybrand, about creating a tax-exempt private foundation to provide low-cost housing, 5/23/1983
28 7 Rehabilitation Tax Credit and Low Income Housing Tax Credit, 1993
28 7 Priscilla Thompson's annotated, chronological list of papers on integrating Woodlawn's housing
C. du Pont v. Woodlawn Trustees, Inc, 1972
Scope and Content
As the issue of integrating Woodlawn's urban housing became more heated in 1972, the State Human Relations Commission, the City of Wilmington, the New Castle County Housing Division and the local media insisted that Woodlawn also look toward integrating Brandywine Hundred and provide homes for African Americans. Woodlawn at one point had even considered selling off all their suburban properties, due to the pressure of building upscale homes in Brandywine Hundred which they knew would either be too expensive to buy or to lease by those for whom they were intended. They decided to prepare a study to determine the feasibility and cost of building homes up to their then-current standards in Brandywine Hundred to serve an eager African-American population. The study coupled with a new Master Plan confirmed that building homes in New Castle County to satisfy the County's housing needs would be too costly and not feasible. As the integration issue was still burning, and as the Wilmington Monthly Meeting seemed more uncomfortable with the current business dealings of the Woodlawn Trustees, a third concurrent legal issue arose with an attempt by Mrs. Martha Verge du Pont to purchase a home from Woodlawn in the upscale county neighborhood of Tavistock to be used for a home for needy children. When Woodlawn refused to sell the property for that purpose, Mrs. Du Pont sued Woodlawn for discriminating against African American children who might inhabit the house. The files which follow describe the law suit of du Pont v. Woodlawn Trustees, Inc.
Woodlawn's house in Tavistock was offered for sale for $75,000, and Mrs. Martha Verge du Pont sent a deposit for $7,500 as a 10% down payment, thereby accepting Woodlawn's offer. Woodlawn, after discussion with Mrs. du Pont who planned to open a home for needy children, changed their mind and rescinded the offer. Legal action by Mrs. du Pont ensued.
Woodlawn's housing policy was again challenged in 1972 by Mrs. William du Pont who sued Woodlawn for discrimination in its housing developments. All of the records filed in the lawsuit are included in this subseries, including testimony, news clippings, and correspondence. The suit was finally dismissed with prejudice in 1974.
Box Folder
28 8 du Pont v. Woodlawn Trustees, 11/28/1972-2/21/1973
Oversize
80 Complaint and support documents for du Pont v. Woodlawn Trustees, Inc., 1973
Box Folder
28 9 Answer to the complaint, deposition of Mrs. du Pont, and the brief for the defense, 2/23/1973-5/17/1973
28 10 du Pont v. Woodlawn Trustees, 5/21/1973-10/22/1973 [Case precedents, change to District Court, and deposition of Woodlawn's John Stocking]
28 11 du Pont v. Woodlawn Trustees, 10/25/1973-12/21/1973 [Production of documents, interrogatories, and additional precedents]
28 12 du Pont v. Woodlawn Trustees, 1/2/1974-3/6/1974 [Plaintiff's opening brief supported their motion for compelling production of documents, defendant's motion to determine this case not to be a class action, stipulated brief schedule]
28 13 du Pont v. Woodlawn Trustees, 3/29/1974-6/26/1974 [Appeal to the office of the State Human Relations Commission sought confirmation that Woodlawn followed its agreement with HRC, additional Interrogatories from the defendants, offer to settle from the plaintiff]
28 14 du Pont v. Woodlawn Trustees, 7/11/1974-8/2/1974 [Additional precedents, support papers from Board Meetings, 1970-1974, defendant's response to plaintiff's request for production of documents]
28 15 du Pont v. Woodlawn Trustees, 8/2/1974-10/16/1974 [Settlement with prejudice]
V. Public Relations and Communications
A. Slides and photographs, 1980s-1990s
Scope and Content
The Woodlawn Trustees used slides and photographs for many purposes. Often the images were used for the orientation for new Trustees, or for educating the Board of Directors about the progress of an on-going project. Frequently the slides would be used with scripts for speeches at events at which the Trustees would publicize the long term efforts of Woodlawn to preserve open space, or to tell the story of the vision of their founder William Poole Bancroft. Boxes 29, 30, and 31 contain slides, photographs and slide show scripts which would have been used for all the aforementioned purposes. The slides are arranged by title as much as possible, and by date on which the photos were taken. Only the highlights are listed.
Contains slides used for educating the Board and civic organizations. Also contains photographs of Woodlawn's properties in the City of Wilmington and New Castle County.
Woodlawn's propensity for detail was outstanding. As soon as the technology was available, the Trustees commissioned as many aerial and ground pictures of potential sites for construction, and construction-in-progress as necessary to satisfy their penchant for perfection in planning. There are slides, photographs, and collages depicting most of their construction projects beginning in the 1940s, especially later in Brandywine Hundred. In addition, when renovating the "flats," Woodlawn took full advantage of the use of photography to report progress at Board Meetings, and for presentations to the general public. Historical pictures include reproductions of a painting of William Bancroft, painted in 1906.
Oversize
81 Scripts for slide presentations, 1989-1990
Box Folder
DC 13 1 Woodlawn's search for a communications consultant, 1973-1975
DC 13 2 Standard script to be used for various civic groups who invite Woodlawn to explain their mission, 1989-1990
DC 13 3 Slightly different version of an all purpose presentation by Newlin Wood, undated
DC 13 4 Two drafts and a final updated version of the standard presentation, 2/8/1991
DC 13 5 Slide show script for the Open Space Council, 1/7/1992
DC 13 6 Slide script delivered at a Land Protection Workshop, 3/12/1992
DC 13 7 Slide script for a presentation for the Civic League of New Castle County, 9/15/1992
DC 13 8 Special slide show script for Councilman Joseph Miro who could not attend the Civic League's meeting, 9/15/1992
DC 13 9 Script for addressing the Brandywine Valley Association, 1993
DC 13 10 Script used for a meeting with the Mayor of Wilmington (1990) and a legislative session in Dover (1994)
DC 13 11 Script for the 1994 version of the Land Protection Workshop
Box Folder
1 1 Friends School, Brandywine Falls, Stapler Park, dedication of the plaque in Brandywine Creek State Park, and Ashland Nature Center [Pictorial Collections, Accession 2010.276], 1982-1987; slides and photographs
1 2 Concord Pike aerial slides, Brandywine Creek, DELDOT & Route 202, Woodlawn residential developments [Pictorial Collections, Accession 2010.276], 1983-2000; slides
1 3 Fire damage at 1004 Poplar St., MBNA construction in Wilmington, renovation of Kirkwood St., Wilmington Alleyways, and other streets in "Flats" [Pictorial Collections, Accession 2010.276], 1989-1995; slides
1 4 Interior renovation to the Ramsey House, and images of the Brubaker, Cleaver and Derickson houses, with aerials of Concord