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John J. Raskob papers
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John J. Raskob papers

Accession 0473

Manuscripts and Archives Department, Hagley Museum and Library


PO Box 3630
Wilmington, Delaware, 19807
302-658-2400
research@hagley.org

Finding aid prepared by Richard James

This finding aid was produced using the Archivists' Toolkit 2013-05-24T14:00-0400

Finding aid prepared using best local practices and Describing Archives: A Content Standard

Cite items for this collection in the following format:
[Description and dates], Box/folder number, John J. Raskob papers (Accession 0473), Hagley Museum and Library, Wilmington, DE 19807

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Descriptive Summary

Title: John J. Raskob papers
Dates: 1900-1956
Accession Number: 0473
Creator: Raskob, John J. (John Jakob), 1879-1950.
Extent: 300 linear feet
Language of Material: English
Repository: Hagley Museum and Library: Manuscripts and Archives Department
Abstract: The collection documents Raskob's business and political careers as well as his personal life. The papers document significant aspects of the histories of E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company and the General Motors Corporation during the first half of the twentieth century.
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Biographical Note

John J. (Jakob) Raskob was born on March 19, 1879, in Lockport, New York. His parents, John and Anna Frances (Moran) Raskob, were the children of immigrants. By the time of Raskob's birth, his father had established a successful cigar-production business in the city. By his own account, Raskob enjoyed a comfortable and enjoyable childhood in Lockport, at that time a thriving city along the Erie Canal and an important transit point for Great Lakes shipping. Raskob's studies at Lockport's parochial and public schools were enlivened by participation in local theater, explorations of the local countryside and vineyards, and regular part-time work as a newspaper-delivery boy and in seasonal agriculture. Lockport had a well-established Catholic community, and Raskob took part in many of its religious and social activities. He stayed connected with classmates and fellow-parishioners for many years.

John J. Raskob graduated from high school and entered a local business school. In June of 1898, his father died after a brief illness (complicated by a misdiagnosis of typhoid fever). The family had some financial resources but young John was the eldest of four siblings and his sisters and brother were still in school, so he chose to abandon his education in order to support his family. Raskob began the secretarial career which would eventually put him in the world of du Pont family heir Pierre S. du Pont.

Raskob first began secretarial work--at the time a common profession for men--with a Lockport lawyer and family friend, John E. Pound. This work was occasional, however, and Raskob soon took permanent positions--first with the Holly Manufacturing Company in Lockport and then as a stenographer for Arthur Moxham, of the Lorain Steel Company (formerly the Johnson Company) in Lorain, Ohio, west of Cleveland on Lake Erie. He moved with Moxham to his employer's new company, Dominion Iron & Steel Company, in Cape Breton, Nova Scotia.

Moxham, the various Johnson Company enterprises, and the du Pont family had long-standing financial and personal connections. One of the most dynamic Johnson Company entrepreneurs was Tom Johnson, who as an unschooled but quick-witted 15-year-old had been employed by Pierre S. du Pont's uncle and guardian Alfred Victor du Pont as a bookkeeper, and had gone on to play a critical role in building the successful and innovative company. Pierre S. du Pont's inheritance of Johnson Company stock had been partly brokered by Tom Johnson and had brought the young industrialist a measure of financial independence. Tom Johnson also persuaded du Pont to take up the presidency of the Johnson Company in 1899 in order to oversee its reorganization and then liquidation following the sale of its steel assets to Federal Steel.

Perhaps Johnson's example was in mind when du Pont considered Raskob's application for a position as stenographer and bookkeeper in the summer of 1900. Both Moxham and Pound strongly recommended the young man, and du Pont hired Raskob in August. By this time, Pierre S. du Pont had completed the reorganization of the Johnson Company and its continuing liquidation had become a routine endeavor. DuPont had been refining a business model for bond-financed consolidation and reorganization of street railways and was ready to put the plan into practice. He expected to spend considerable time traveling in pursuit of a suitable market for this project and, as a result, believed it would be more proper to have a male secretary. By the time negotiations began to buy two street railways in Dallas, Texas, in March 1901, du Pont had already developed an appreciation for Raskob's insight and facility with numbers. He allowed his young secretary to take a role in the negotiations.

Raskob accompanied Pierre S. du Pont to Wilmington in 1902 after du Pont's unexpected succession to leadership of the family business that had alienated him a decade before. Pierre became one of the triumvirate of young du Ponts hastily formed after Alfred I. du Pont's impulsive bid to save the company from being sold to competitors following the death of company president Eugene du Pont. As private secretary to the new treasurer of E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company, Raskob assisted with the financial and organizational restructuring and powder-industry consolidation that consumed much of Pierre's efforts in his first few years at the new company.

In 1904, Raskob became Pierre S. du Pont's assistant in du Pont's new position as treasurer of the newly formed E.I. du Pont de Nemours Powder Company and traveled extensively with his employer. DuPont and Raskob visited San Francisco in 1904 to transact urgent business with the California Powder Company. From December 1904 until May 1905, Raskob and du Pont, along with other young company executives, traveled to Britain and France and then to Valparaiso, Chile, to negotiate the purchase of nitrates for the company. This was Raskob's first experience with foreign travel, which he would enjoy to the last year of his life.

During these busy and productive years, Raskob moved his mother and siblings to Wilmington. The family lived together at various locations in the city, including homes on Adams Street and on Gilpin Avenue. Raskob attended a number of Catholic churches in Wilmington, and it was at St. Mary's Church on Union Street that he first encountered Helena Springer Green. Helena was well educated, descended from some of the first Catholic settlers of Maryland, and a music lover who played the organ at St. Mary's Sunday services. Family tradition holds that Raskob, in order to catch the eye of the young organist, paid a substantial bribe to the organ-bellows operator in order to take the boy's place near her and thereby effect an introduction. The couple were married on June 18, 1906, and the first of their thirteen children was born the following March.

During these early years Raskob carefully supplemented his salary through his first forays into the stock market. With his first-hand knowledge of prospects for the powder industry, he financed the first of his many investments in Eastern Dynamite and the new DuPont powder company through bank loans and personal loans from Pierre. These initial investments formed the basis of his eventual fortune. His growing wealth and close association with the du Pont family and the company brought Raskob an increasing (and perhaps unwelcome) social prominence in Wilmington, and he was frequently sought out to lend his name to city charities. His philanthropy grew with his wealth during this period; Raskob became an increasingly important benefactor to a number of local charities, particularly those involved in the relief of families and orphans, and to campaigns by various Catholic churches in the city. Raskob also gave widely, and discreetly, to needy individuals.

During his first ten years with the reorganized company, Raskob's primary role included supporting the endeavors and strategies of his employer. He was also open to new opportunities and pursued them as time and resources allowed. He was part-owner of the Bee Hive Company, a stationery and tobacco store that operated out of the new DuPont Building on Wilmington's Market Street, and also invested in a few small agricultural concerns in Delaware and Florida.

Raskob's fortunes continued to rise with the company and with Pierre S. du Pont's ascendancy within it. A period of diversification and reorganization in the company began around 1909, encompassed the divisive reorganizations of 1911 and 1914, and included the breakup of the company and division of its assets in accordance with anti-trust decrees of 1911 and 1912. Pierre S. du Pont's role at the company changed as well in this period; he unburdened himself of a number of day-to-day responsibilities by transferring them to Raskob, making him officially the assistant treasurer of E.I. du Pont de Nemours Powder Company in 1911 and treasurer in 1914. During this time Raskob also served in directorships and other executive capacities in several other company subsidiaries as the company's interests diversified; these included the DuPont Fabrikoid Company and the DuPont Nitrate Company.

Despite the interpersonal and familial turmoil that influenced much of the top-level management strategy and operations of the company at this time, the decade following the antitrust divestiture was phenomenally profitable for the company and its stockholders. Raskob continued to add to his large holdings of stock in the powder company and then in the DuPont Securities Company (later called Christiana Securities Company), the holding company for du Pont family investment interests that he helped organize in 1915 after Pierre S. du Pont's purchase of T. Coleman du Pont's stock holdings. Raskob negotiated the financing of this transaction and in return was allowed to join the company as the only non-du Pont family member.

These and other investments provided a luxurious standard of living for the Raskob household, which by the middle of the decade included eight children. Raskob had moved his family out of the increasingly crowded and dirty city in 1910 to property he purchased in Claymont, Delaware, at the far end of the Market Street streetcar line. Further purchases of lots and parcels followed, and in 1916 Raskob demolished the existing residence on the site. On what he called the Archmere estate, Raskob began the design and construction of a grand Italianate villa. Construction lasted for almost two years, and the family took up residence in their new home in the spring of 1918. The household, which included large domestic and grounds staffs, was managed through Archmere Inc., a holding company that Raskob established in January 1916 and which financed the construction of the house, held most of the assets of the estate, and managed retirement and savings funds for the employees.

Raskob retained a number of important positions in the DuPont Company and its subsidiaries throughout this period. He served as treasurer and on the executive and finance committees of the E.I du Pont de Nemours Powder Company from 1914 until the 1918 reorganization; was director, treasurer, and member of the executive and finance committees of E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company from its incorporation in 1915; and was appointed a vice president in 1918. He held the positions of director and vice president of this company until 1946. From 1917 until 1920 he served as a director of the DuPont Engineering Company, which operated defense-contract production facilities at the Old Hickory powder plant near Nashville, Tennessee.

Through the pre- and post-war period, Raskob increasingly directed his entrepreneurial energies towards the nascent American automobile industry. While there were still periodic dramas and new directions at the old powder company as management and the company made the transition from explosives to chemicals, it was no longer a consuming day-to-day endeavor for either Raskob or Pierre S. du Pont. The automobile bug had bitten John Raskob in 1907, the year he retired his horse and buggy in favor of the first of a great many horseless carriages. He quickly identified the investment opportunities presented by this emerging industry, beginning his investments in automobile industry stocks from 1913. Raskob's involvement with and promotion of General Motors (GM) and its stock was a major factor in the company's transformation from a significant but financially vulnerable company into one of the historic giants of American industry.

Both Raskob and Pierre S. du Pont invested quickly and heavily in GM and reaped tremendous profits as the share price soared from 1914 to 1915. In the latter year, both men's relationship to the company changed radically because of an ownership dispute between William C. Durant, the founder of GM, and a voting trust of Boston banks that had controlled the company under a five-year financing agreement. Durant was eager to reassert full control over the company once again, and his efforts were supported by Lewis G. Kauffman, president of the Chatham and Phenix Bank of New York City. Pierre S. du Pont, Raskob, and the DuPont Company had all been valuable long-time clients of Kauffman and his bank, and Pierre was invited to join the board of GM, with Kauffman asserting that Durant's takeover was a done deal and GM's finances secure. Neither claim was true; and Pierre, accompanied by Raskob, was thrust into the midst of a contentious board meeting on September 16, 1915. Arguments over ownership and control were resolved through an eventual compromise wherein Pierre was called upon to name three neutral directors in order to break the deadlock between the Durant interests and the Boston bankers. Pierre's "neutral" directors were his brother-in-law Lammot Belin, the DuPont Company's J. Armory Haskell, and John J. Raskob. With this unexpected ascension, the curtain was raised on the second act of John Raskob's life: the corporate leadership of General Motors, which consumed his business energies and shaped his family life through the 1920s.

Raskob's and Pierre S. du Pont's first impulse was to reshape the corporate structure of a loosely consolidated GM along the lines of the DuPont Company. They came to this conclusion after a lengthy inspection of GM's facilities and offices in the fall of 1915. Durant was not, however, interested in diluting his own pervasive influence and control, as such restructuring would have done, despite his growing inability to administer the growing company during wartime expansion of production. As part of this expansion and corresponding restructuring, Durant had acquired a number of parts and supplies companies and had discovered and promoted Alfred P. Sloan, founder and president of one of these newly acquired subsidiaries, to lead the reincorporated General Motors Corporation.

Throughout this time of growth and profit at General Motors, Pierre S. du Pont was once again engaged with DuPont legal and operational affairs. Raskob represented Pierre's interests at GM then and throughout the critical period from mid-1917 when growing investor uncertainty threatened to precipitate a financial crisis at GM. Earlier attempts at securing liquidity had failed, so Raskob decided to approach the DuPont Company directly in an attempt to tap into its vast war profits. He proposed that the company purchase sufficient GM stock to stabilize the market and thus the positions of Raskob and Durant. The investment plan he drew up emphasized the potentially vast prospects for the United States automobile market as well as the potential market for DuPont's chemical, fabric, and paint products within GM's production facilities. The timeliness of presentation, coming as it did just as negotiations with the government for war-production contracts seemed stalled, helped to overcome initial reservations by some board members about the appropriateness and wisdom of such a dramatic departure from the company's traditional interests. Raskob's arguments were presented in Wilmington at DuPont finance and executive committee meetings on December 19 and 20, 1917. In response, the Company made the single largest corporate investment in an outside company in U.S. business to that time.

DuPont's $25 million bought much more than Durant and Raskob's financial security. The company obtained substantial control of GM and Chevrolet through its representation on the board of the corporation and through an equal say in selection of the directorates of subsidiaries. In the short term, dividends from GM stock and a privileged access for DuPont's Fabrikoid, pyralin, paint and varnish products helped avoid the potential dilution of profitability that DuPont's diversification efforts risked. More important for John Raskob's and Pierre S. du Pont's stories, DuPont took direct control over GM financial operations; Raskob became chairman of GM's finance committee, other members of which included Pierre, Irénée, and Henry F. du Pont. DuPont's interests were managed through the holding company DuPont American Industries, Inc., on whose executive committee Raskob served from 1918 until 1923.

By the end of 1918, Raskob had been appointed a vice president of GM and had resigned from the executive committee of E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company. While he was still involved with the DuPont Company at many levels, this symbolized a shift in Raskob's allegiance and interests that was physically manifested in his increasing distance from his family in Wilmington. After GM's reorganization and refinancing in 1920, when Durant was cut loose from the company he had founded and Pierre S. du Pont, Alfred Sloan, and Raskob found themselves in charge, GM became a much more consuming business than the DuPont Company had been for several years. Raskob was required to spend a considerable amount of time in the company's New York offices. Residing in some style in an apartment at the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel that he shared with Pierre S. du Pont, Raskob was liberated from the conservative social and cultural life of Wilmington and threw himself into an exploration of jazz-age Manhattan. He became an habitué of Broadway, gaining acquaintances on the more respectable end of bohemia and becoming friends with emerging Catholic business and political leaders of New York City.

During the 1920s, Raskob was increasingly influenced by such figures as William F. Kenny, who exemplified a particular, uniquely New York type: self-made, brash, unencumbered by his humble origins and Catholic faith, and impatient with the establishment and its prejudices. Perhaps envying a lack of compromise and a personal confidence that he himself still lacked despite all his successes, Raskob gradually became involved in the social networks of New York's Catholic entrepreneurs that were tightly enmeshed in, and had a pervasive loyalty to, the Democratic Party. At the same time, Raskob became firm friends with other business and banking leaders then resident in the city: Walter Chrysler, Owen Young, and Michael Meehan among them. This circle offered an intoxicating mix of friendship, finances, business, and politics.

In New York, Raskob indulged in his long-standing passion for the theater with visits to an astounding number of Broadway productions, and his hospitality to visiting executives from Detroit, Flint, and Wilmington almost always included tickets to the latest shows. Raskob had supported the theater in Wilmington, through his promotion and financing of the Playhouse Theater in the DuPont Building. In New York, his passion and pocketbook ensured that all the stage doors of the Great White Way were opened to him. Raskob dabbled in producing with the young star and agent Eddie Dowling; dined with Elizabeth Marbury and her lover, the famous designer Elsie de Wolfe; and enjoyed the hospitality of the infamous "Tiger Room," which William Kenny had built as a private retreat offering both entertainment and politics.

During these exciting years, Raskob worked closely with Pierre S. du Pont in implementing organizational restructuring at GM and heading off periodic crises caused by inventory slippages, stock forecasting, and the long shadow of Durant--who, it was widely rumored, wished to reassert leadership of GM and whose wily genius could never be discounted. Raskob helped develop financial strategies, including an executive bonus plan, that reduced the vulnerability the company to speculation and ensured the loyalty of top GM staff in an extremely competitive market for automobile executives. As the plan's most fervent booster, over the reservations of Sloan and other key figures, Raskob became known as the "millionaire-maker"; the company's market success translated into staggering dividends and bonuses for those covered by the plan through the Management Securities Company. Raskob also revolutionized the auto trade through the introduction of installment financing, first offered in 1919 through the Raskob-designed General Motors Acceptance Corporation.

General Motors responsibilities did not consume all of Raskob's time, resources, or inventiveness. Thanks to his connections with the entertainment world, he was well aware of the burgeoning motion-picture industry from its very earliest days. He participated in speculative technological ventures in this field as early as 1912, particularly the development of synchronized sound recording and playback in movie theaters. During the 1920s, with his broader interests and greater liquidity, Raskob played the stock market in a much edgier way. Through connections such as Michael Meehan, Raskob took part in a number of the most infamous trading syndicates of the mid- to late 1920s--including the extremely profitable RCA syndicate of 1929. At the same time Raskob steadily accumulated a very large block of stock in Warner Brothers, spawning recurring rumors of an imminent Raskob-led takeover of the company. Raskob's strategy with this investment is unclear; but in many letters boosting the stock to friends and business acquaintances he suggested that he simply saw it as a good speculative investment. The investment should also be considered in the context of his increasingly activist Catholicism during this time, the Catholic Church's growing concern over "decency," and the influence of the cinema on American's social attitudes. The Society for the Propagation of the Faith, the Loretto Foundation, future Cardinal Francis Spellman, and the North American College of Cardinals were among the many individuals and groups for whom Raskob arranged Warner investments.

Indeed, Raskob was very publicly Catholic during the 1920s, and he supported and promoted Catholic causes in a variety of ways. He provided considerable financial support to the Calvert Associates publication Commonweal, which from its founding in 1924 led the struggle against populist anti-Catholic sentiment. In 1928, Raskob worked with the Bishop of Wilmington, Edward FitzMaurice, to establish the Catholic Foundation of the Diocese of Wilmington, Inc., a trusteeship organization of clergy and laity. The foundation secured the finances of the Diocese through a large gift from Raskob, which he specified was to be administered in a businesslike manner to promote Catholic education and parish needs in the Diocese. It was his model for financial organization within the American church; Raskob aggressively promoted the role of the laity in the church's public and financial life and often sharply criticized the manner in which local churches and dioceses approached their financial concerns through crisis and mendicancy.

Raskob's prominence as a leading American Catholic was recognized in his induction into a number of Catholic confraternities and societies, including the Order of Malta. In 1928, Pope Pius XI appointed Raskob to the honorary position of private chamberlain in the Papal Household in recognition of his support of Catholic institutions in the United States and his involvement in political and financial interests of the church in the United States and Mexico and at the Vatican.

The Raskob family was completed in 1922 with the birth of John and Helena Raskob's thirteenth child, Benjamin Green Raskob. The family still resided at Archmere, although a number of the older children attended Catholic boarding schools. The younger children lived at Archmere in classic American aristocratic style under the care of housekeepers and nurses and attended Catholic day schools in Wilmington. One such school, the Ursuline Academy, was another long-standing Catholic institution that enjoyed Raskob's philanthropy during the 1920s.

The Archmere Estate was coming under increasing pressure from residential and industrial development, and its proximity to the DuPont Company headquarters was less important to Raskob as his business and personal interests blossomed in New York City. In 1925 the family began to acquire land near Centreville, in rural Queen Anne's County, Maryland, first as a summer retreat but increasingly as a permanent residence. A number of Raskob's children, as well as Helena herself, suffered serious allergies and from asthma and other respiratory issues, and the industrialization of the Marcus Hook area just north of Archmere became a problem for them. These health issues, the elitist appeal of maintaining a country estate, and extortion threats against Helena Raskob and the children by thugs in Philadelphia eventually combined to create the family's decision to relocate to their Centreville property, which they named Pioneer Point Farms, year-round.

Raskob's emergence as a political figure was influenced by his immersion in New York's confident, entrepreneurial Catholic culture and his deepening friendship and respect for a number of key Catholic businessmen in the city. His oldest sons attended the Newman School in Lakewood, New Jersey, in the early 1920s, and at this prestigious institution's fundraising and social functions Raskob was introduced to a number of wealthy coreligionists outside of the automobile industry. William Kenny hosted a number of meetings of Newman School fathers at his Tiger Room, which was by no coincidence the central focus of post-Tammany Democratic Party organizing in New York City. At the same time, Raskob also become more active in the city's financial institutions, taking director's seats at the Bankers Trust Company and County Trust Company in early 1927, the American International Corporation later in the year, and the almost exclusively Catholic Emigrant Industrial Savings Bank in 1928.

Many of Raskob's new business partners and friends were longtime supporters of the "Happy Warrior," Alfred Emanuel Smith, one-time Bowery Boy turned governor of New York State. Raskob and Smith quickly became friends; when Smith decided to seek the Democratic Party's presidential nomination in 1928, he selected Raskob as his campaign manager and urged the party to elect Raskob chairman of the Democratic National Committee (hereafter DNC).

Politics represented a new field of endeavor for Raskob. He had been involved in local and state races in Delaware, particularly since these were often du Pont family affairs, but the Smith campaign required of Raskob an unaccustomed public prominence. Along with Pierre S. du Pont and other du Pont family members, Raskob had developed strong political views on the issue of national Prohibition since the mid 1920s; and since Smith was known to be "wet," his candidacy was especially appealing to those who favored repeal.

Raskob's financial skills and personal resources played an important role in the 1928 campaign both nationally and in New York. Years later James A. Farley and the columnist Westbrook Pegler, among others, suggested that Raskob had been instrumental in persuading Franklin D. Roosevelt to seek the governorship in that year by ensuring the viability of Roosevelt's Warm Springs Foundation through a large donation. At the time, this may have seemed like a straightforward tactic to keep New York in the Democratic camp under a reliable leader, one who was somewhat unserious and amenable to the interests of his political patrons. If Pegler and Farley's claims were true, then Raskob's importance to the evolution of American political history in the 20th Century should not be overlooked; although since Raskob may have placed Roosevelt on the path to a presidency and a power that he would come to fear and despise, the irony cannot be ignored.

Raskob's political involvement precipitated a management crisis at GM. Alfred Sloan's stated concern was that Raskob's public allegiance to Smith would imply the support of GM; that would be risky politically, given the company's size and prominence, and Sloan may have feared that Raskob's position might precipitate a politically motivated antitrust investigation. Sloan was also concerned that corporate political partisanship might alienate potential purchasers. Sloan's insistence that "General Motors is not in politics," stated at an address in Flint and published and distributed to GM shareholders and the press, made Raskob's ouster inevitable; the board quickly accepted his resignation as chairman of the finance committee. Out of loyalty to the friend who had first drawn him into the business, and perhaps seeing an opportunity to make his own long desired break with corporate life, Pierre S. du Pont resigned his position as chairman of the board. Both men remained on the board of GM, and Raskob rejoined the finance committee after the Smith campaign ended, but neither man was ever really key to the company's successes thereafter. Pierre S. du Pont effectively retired from active business life and became increasingly engaged with his horticultural projects at Longwood and his interests in social and educational reform, projects that did not require Raskob's assistance or advice.

The year was one of tragedy for Raskob, as well as transition. On July 5, 1928, William Frederick Raskob II--John and Helena's second eldest child--was killed in an automobile accident just outside Centreville as he returned with schoolfriends from Yale University. Bill Raskob was a bright and beloved sportsman and scholar, and his sudden death was hard for the family to bear. That it came at the height of Raskob's social, political, and economic prominence was even more poignant. In memory of their son the Raskobs created the Bill Raskob Foundation, with an initial funding of one million dollars, to provide grants and loans to needy and deserving college students and prospective students.

For the next four years, Raskob concerned himself primarily with building the DNC as a permanent organization, preparing for a 1932 Smith candidacy and a campaign to repeal Prohibition. Repeal remained a thorny issue for the national party. Many Southern Democrats were adamantly opposed not only to the idea of repeal in itself but also to Raskob's attempts to craft a national policy that could be seen to favor regional and religious interests. Many members of Congress were cautious about the professionalization of the party, which had not formerly been a permanent organization with a fixed headquarters, and resented incursions upon their ideological independence in matters of policy.

The political and popular fixation on Prohibition was abruptly ended by the Crash of 1929 and the onset of the Great Depression. Formerly important issues and aspects of the Prohibition debate such as the undermining of respect for the law, rights of states to self-govern, and the replacement of consumption taxes with income taxes were largely swept away as the U.S. polity demanded relief and resolution of an unprecedented level of want and poverty. Political figures who tried to continue the pre-Depression arguments became increasingly marginal, and proponents of traditional laissez-faire remedies within the domestic economy were eclipsed by individuals and organizations willing to propose populist and progressive programs to combat the nation's ills.

Raskob weathered the Crash and the onset of Depression. His speculative investments, while profitable, were a small part of his assets, which had from the earliest days been concentrated in steady performers and large industrial concerns and in holding companies such as Christiana with relatively staid but secure portfolios. General Motors and DuPont were the foundation of Raskob's wealth, and he had often stated his opposition to buying on margin, shorting stock, and other risky strategies that caused such hardship in the immediate post-Crash market.

It was Raskob's bad luck, however, to have made his famous statement that "[e]veryone ought to be rich" immediately before the Crash, in an article in the August 1929 Ladies Home Journal. In this article, Raskob had laid out proposals for working- and middle-class wealth building through cautious and rational investment strategies. In many ways, these proposals reflected the practice of his Archmere and Pioneer Point Farms employee savings programs and Raskob-designed employee investment plans at DuPont and General Motors as well as the extraordinarily lucrative Managers Securities Company. Raskob had long been rumored to be working on perfecting a national "workingman's investment fund," and the magazine article suggested the likely philosophy of such a scheme. In other circumstances, Raskob's reputation as the "millionaire-maker" of GM would have given this plan quite a deal of credibility; but in the aftermath of Wall Street's panic and widespread ruin of small investors, Raskob was popularly criticized as a "plunger" and speculator, a pied piper leading widows and workers to financial disaster. The rumor that Raskob avoided deeper losses in his investment portfolio through a complex series of stock sales and repurchases to and from Pierre S. du Pont, in order to provide tax-deductible paper losses to offset the share value lost, also proved damaging and became a weapon used by his political enemies against Raskob a decade later.

The Depression marginalized Raskob's political concerns. Like many others in trade and industry, he was inclined towards laissez faire economic policy, supported entirely local or philanthropic relief programs, and tentatively proposed technocratic solutions to perceived consumption and production problems. His insistence on continuing to promote Prohibition repeal as a Democratic Party priority and on lobbying for another Smith candidacy in the 1932 presidential election left him increasingly out of step with the national party. The pro-Roosevelt faction led by James A. Farley ruthlessly outmaneuvered Raskob during the run-up to and proceedings of the party's 1932 national convention. Along with his skillful choreographing of support for Roosevelt, Farley disrupted Raskob's plans for the DNC succession. With the committee now increasingly central and important, Raskob intended to place his loyal lieutenant Jouett Shouse in the chairman's seat. The Roosevelt faction exercised the traditional prerogative of the official candidate, however, and placed Farley in that position. While Raskob publicly declared his support for Roosevelt during the early stages of the New Deal, he became thoroughly disenchanted with politics; and whatever political aspirations he might have had (many friends and fans had touted him as a potential secretary of the Treasury) were wiped out with the emergence of the Roosevelt ideology.

His political ascendancy halted and his greatest business successes behind him, Raskob entered the Roosevelt era curiously rootless. Along with his work for the DNC, Raskob had also been an influential figure in the Association Against the Prohibition Amendment (AAPA). The AAPA was the preeminent national organization of Prohibition opponents, strongly backed by Pierre S. du Pont and other du Pont family members and company executives, and Raskob had been part of its vigorous campaign of lobbying state legislatures, promoting repeal ballots, and publicizing the injustices of the Volstead Act. Roosevelt swiftly moved to effect an end to national Prohibition without alienating dry Democrats or diverting energy away from his economic reform agenda, and the AAPA quite suddenly had the victory it had been working toward--although it was a victory without laurels which did not advance the political philosophy which underlay the AAPA's opposition to Prohibition. Raskob remained unwillingly enmeshed in DNC financial issues, primarily in lengthy attempts to secure promised campaign underwriting funds from a number of party backers who had been put in straitened circumstances by the Depression. Some of these individuals spent many years attempting to avoid their obligations, a circumstance that was troubling for Raskob personally because he had provided substantial campaign loans to the DNC secured by the promises of the individual underwriters. Farley appeared to feel little obligation to assist Raskob in this matter, and that may have influenced his increasing alienation from the party.

Raskob was also occupied by the troubled prospects for his most visible and enduring legacy, New York City's Empire State Building. While the building symbolized business optimism in the darkest days of Depression, it placed a tremendous drain on Raskob's fortune and ran the risk of bringing him close to financial ruin. Raskob had envisioned the skyscraper in more prosperous times, and he had invited a number of his closest friends and associates to invest in what must have seemed at the time a sure thing. Al Smith was almost entirely dependent on his investments in the building and his position of chairman of the building's holding company. A convoluted sequence of refinancing and bond issues kept the concern viable for a number of years, but rental income never met projections and maintenance; repair and improvements were constant drains. By 1938, the Empire State Building appeared to be on the verge of bankruptcy, since the bonds and promissory notes that financed the building's operations and serviced its debt were essentially fictions agreed upon by the partners and investors. If stock fell into unfriendly hands, the liquidation and sale of the building would be inevitable. Raskob went one last time to his mentor and friend Pierre S. du Pont, who had been one of the original investors in the building but had since the Depression become less certain of Raskob's advice concerning investment strategy and who had divested his investments into various holdings without seeking the advice of his one-time protégée.

In response to appeals from Raskob and Smith, among others, du Pont agreed to sell to the partnership a very large annuity-bearing life-insurance policy held jointly with his wife Alice Belin du Pont. The two received in return periodic cash payments from the Empire State partners, and the policy provided a valuable asset and much needed income for the building. With the du Ponts' help, the building weathered its last storm; in the pre-war recovery of New York business and real estate, it became as profitable an enterprise as Raskob had originally conceived it to be. The Empire State Building became the core of Raskob's wealth in his last years as well as the foundation of his enduring charitable legacy.

From 1932, Raskob's business interests were much less monumental in scope, if not in form. Even at the height of his involvements with the DuPont Company and GM, Raskob had always been aware of and active in a large number of smaller scale, diverse ventures in New York State, Delaware, and further afield. Many of these enterprises took advantage of Raskob's knowledge of and involvement in the product and production chain of the chemical and automobile industries, and they were also typically characterized by support of investment or occupational interests of old friends, relatives, and acquaintances. From his earliest years with the DuPont Company, Raskob endeavored to find positions in Wilmington and New Jersey for old schoolfriends from Lockport, coworkers from Lorain, and family members from New York State and Indiana. As his wealth grew and his interests diversified, he gladly supported friends' business ventures--including insecticide factories in New York State, auto dealerships, and floor-product companies, among many others--as long as the old friends in charge could convince him that the enterprises were on some kind of sound footing and had reasonable market prospects and management competency. From the early 1930s, Raskob began to apply this critical but faithful model of support to his adult sons, John Jakob, Jr. and Robert Pierre Raskob, in their attempts to make their own business careers.

A confluence of disparate circumstances and coincidences combined from the 1930s on to interest Raskob more and more in investment opportunities, particularly mining and ranching, in the southwestern states. Raskob's eldest son, John, Jr., moved to Nevada with his young family after brief terms with a number of GM subsidiary companies, and Raskob was interested in his son's business success and ability to provide for his family. Raskob's young acquaintance Acquin Feeney was also speculating in Nevada at this time, and Raskob saw Feeney, a friend of his son's, as a potentially reliable business partner. Since the 1920s, Raskob had been involved in a number of groups advocating monetary policy based on the silver standard and had struck up a friendship with Key Pittman, U.S. Senator from Nevada, who owned extensive mining interests in his home state. Speculation in precious metals became increasingly attractive with the government's entry into the silver market during the early years of the Depression, while mining businesses also provided a hedge against taxation because investment losses in this field were tax-deductible. Raskob was convinced that a number of formerly marginal or outright abandoned mines could be made profitable because of improvements in refining technology, and in 1934 he began to purchase mining claims for the newly incorporated Raskob Mining Interests, Inc., managed by his oldest sons and Feeney. The mining concern was run as a family operation until 1938-1939, and then Raskob brought in seasoned mining professionals to manage the business as it expanded through the wartime years.

While he was building a portfolio of silver mines, Raskob also engaged in ranching and real-estate development in New Mexico, Arizona, and California. In the late 1920s, Raskob had formed a friendship with Thomas D. Campbell, the "Wheat King" of Montana. Campbell was a lively, self-made man, wealthy and adventurous, with political and business interests in New York. He was reputedly the first man to mechanize and industrialize farming in the western states. In 1936, Raskob and Campbell formed an investment partnership to purchase and develop extensive land grants in the southwestern states for ranching and farming. Raskob was also interested in development of the Palm Springs area in California and purchased a great deal of property in this area during the late 1930s.

Raskob, like many others in the business world, was initially supportive of Roosevelt's economic reforms in the early stages of the New Deal. While he had been upset and offended by Roosevelt's political maneuverings during the lead-in to the 1932 Chicago convention and disappointed with the treatment of political protégées such as Al Smith and Jouett Shouse, Raskob expressed some measure of admiration for Roosevelt the man, particularly for his struggle against polio. In some of his dealings with Roosevelt as New York's governor, Raskob often seemed to express a mixture of appreciation and a sense of an obligation owed. But as the New Deal seemed to take on a sense of class struggle, Raskob's opinion hardened in accordance with those of his mentors and business acquaintances. They expressed their alienation from the new political order in the formation of the American Liberty League in 1934.

The League initially portrayed itself as a nonpartisan group interested in educating the electorate on issues of economic freedom, individual and property rights, and constitutional government. Many of the group's positions closely reflected the theoretical underpinnings of the Alliance Against the Prohibition Amendment, and many of the League's leaders had been officers and major supporters of the repeal movement. The League's ideological position placed them in opposition to many of Roosevelt's and Congress's initiatives--particularly as the government became, in their view, increasingly confiscatory and statist. By the time of the 1936 election, the League was obliged to support actively the Republican candidate for President, Alf Landon. Earlier, the League had confined itself to producing numerous publications, providing analysis and editorial comment for national and local newspapers, and organizing and broadcasting speeches by League members. Raskob had as high hopes for the League in 1936 as he had had for his friend Al Smith in 1928, and he was just as surprised by the outcome of the election. Raskob also endured a vitriolic response by the public and by politicians to the League's attempts to influence the election. The founders and members of the organization were portrayed and perceived as representatives of America's hereditary privileged elites, quite out of touch with the economic realities of everyday Americans. The public's response to the League was in part genuine and spontaneous, in part skillfully manipulated and orchestrated by Democratic Party operatives both locally and nationally.

After the public's response to the Liberty League's agenda, Raskob never again took part in any prominent political issues; he continued to support quietly a number of organizations that opposed the Roosevelt administration and the expansion of federal government power in general. His enthusiasm for politics was also sapped by what he perceived as a retaliatory inquiry ordered by the Internal Revenue Service against Pierre S. du Pont and himself, which alleged that the two had conspired to offset investment losses after the Wall Street crash by manipulating income-tax deductions from stock trades.

Throughout the 1940s, Raskob continued to develop his mining and ranching interests, which by 1947 included silver mines in Mexico as well as grazing and mineral rights in New Mexico and Arizona. He also developed earlier investments in the aeronautical industry, becoming enthusiastic about plans to develop and market rudderless aircraft suitable for personal use and local commuting.

During World War II, all of Raskob's sons, as well as several of his son-in-laws, served in the U.S. armed forces. His youngest son, Benjamin, saw service at Guadalcanal in the Pacific. Raskob divided his time between New York and his various business enterprises in the southwest. Helena Raskob stayed in Arizona for longer periods, and there were no Raskob children at home, so Raskob rarely visited Pioneer Point Farms. He even considered selling the property to the government for war use. After the war, though, the farm again became a central place for the family, a popular summer gathering place for Raskob's children and increasing number of grandchildren. In his final decade of life, Raskob took great pleasure in the time he spent there with friends and family. He still resided mainly in New York City, managing his business and financial interests from his splendid office in the Empire State Building. Having weathered the difficulties of the 1930s, the building was by the postwar period an obvious success, and upon his death it was the core asset of Raskob's estate. Empire State stock was also integral to the founding of the Raskob Foundation for Catholic Activities.

Raskob died at home on October 15, 1950, and was buried in Wilmington. Family lore holds that Pierre S. du Pont and his brother-in-law, R.R.M. "Ruly" Carpenter were not at the service in St. Peter's Cathedral in Wilmington. When the family emerged from the church after the funeral mass, they were greeted by the sight of those elderly captains of industry, once the family patriarch's closest business associates who had built two of the world's greatest companies with Raskob's advice and acumen, struggling along behind a broken-down automobile as it was pushed or towed to the door of the church. The automobile, it was noted by all, was not a General Motors model.

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Scope and Content

The collection documents Raskob's business and political careers as well as his personal life. The papers document significant aspects of the histories of E.I. du Pont de Nemours & Company and the General Motors Corporation during the first half of the twentieth century. Raskob played a crucial role in the creation of these two industrial giants. His papers trace the transformation of these companies into modern decentralized corporations and the relationship between business strategy and corporate structure. The Raskob Papers also describe the relationship between DuPont and G.M. in the years between 1915 and 1950.

The papers also describe Raskob's political career. His election as head of the Democratic National Committee at Alfred E. Smith's request in 1928 is documented as well as the role he played in raising money for Smith's presidential campaign. The papers document Raskob's work with the American Liberty League. There is also considerable documentation on the role that Raskob played in the construction and management of the Empire State Building during the 1930s and 40s. The collection also provides an interesting perspective on business opposition to the New Deal.

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Arrangement

Arranged alphabetically by subject and correspondent.

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Series Descriptions and Inventory

File
1 'A' Correspondents: Single Letters, 1910-1950 [Alphabetical file of single letters from various individuals, organizations and companies. Topics include business offers, personal and domestic issues, household purchases and improvements, requests for employment and financial assistance, and political opinions] ; 80 items
File
2 Aaronson, Elizabeth, 1934-1948 [Correspondence with mother of daughter-in-law Minerva Aaronson, mostly travel and meeting arrangements] ; 6 items
File
3 Aaronson, Minerva E., 1937-1953 [Letter from John J. Raskob (hereafter Raskob) to Mrs. Aaronson-Miller, discussing health of Minerva Aaronson; letter in appreciation of gift from Raskob. Correspondence between 1947-1953 mostly concerns Raskob's financial support of children of Minerva and Raskob Jr. after their separation, and Raskob's visits with his grandchildren] ; 13 items
File
4 Abbot, Anita W., 1936 [Concerning visits; general family news and health matters related to Raskob's sickness and convalescence] ; 4 items
File
5 Abele Family, 1901-1933 [Invitation for Raskob to be best man at cousin Charles' wedding; Raskob's responses discussing his business activities and involvement with Dallas Consolidated Electric Street Railway Company; investment advice. Also includes correspondence with aunt, Katherine Abele concerning sale of family property in Lockport, NY; correspondence with cousin Charles' wife Louise Noll Abell and her son Kenneth Abell, concerning employment opportunities] ; 15 items
File
6 Abercrombie & Fitch Co., 1921-1940 [Receipts for sporting goods for William Raskob, Jr.; bills and receipts for Christmas gifts for friends and family, and related correspondence] ; 11 items
File
7 Academy of Political Science, 1918-1947 [Correspondence concerning Raskob's membership; announcements of meetings and events of the Academy; annual reports of the President for 1922 and 1924, 1928; agendas for meetings on various topics, including war preparedness and post-war economic recovery, international trade relations, domestic public policy and labor relations; text for Raskob's 1926 speech to annual meeting, "The Development of Installment Purchasing," and related press clippings collected by General Motors Corporation Department of Publicity; text of address to Academy by Philadelphia Mayor J. Hampton Moore, on the city's welfare services] ; 100 items
File
8 Adair, Betty, 1917-1918 [Correspondence with child of acquaintances] ; 4 items
File
9 Adamson, Henry, 1935-1936 [Condolences upon Raskob's illness] ; 2 items
File
10 Addicks, Ida Carr, 1912-1922 [Correspondence with resident of Claymont, DE. Topics include organization of voluntary fire department for Claymont and recommendation to buy General Motors stock. Addicks was the original owner of part of the Archmere property] ; 5 items
File
11 Advertising Club of New York, 1930-1937 [Invitations to attend club functions, including receptions for Governor Franklin D. Roosevelt and for Alfred E. Smith] ; 3 items
File
12 Aeolian Company., 1924-1939 [Correspondence with and solicitations from piano and organ dealer, builders of organs for Pierre S. du Pont (hereafter PSdP) at Longwood and for Irénée du Pont's Cuban residence, Xanadu; product announcements and brochure for the Aeolian organ at the Duke University Chapel] ; 14 items
File
13 Aero Supply Manufacturing Co., 1929-1941 [Financial statements, investment reports and related correspondence concerning Raskob's participation in an investment syndicate holding shares in Aero Supply, a manufacturer of parts and supplies for the airplane manufacturing industry. Includes correspondence concerning agreements and proposed mergers with other aerospace companies; concerning structuring of share offers; production and financial status reports; correspondence and press clippings concerning Raskob's acquisition of majority interest in company; concerning relocation of company facilities to Corry, PA; concerning diversification of products into the domestic appliance market, including the 'Electro-Tub' washing machine] ; 100 items
File
14 Aetna life Insurance Co., 1919-1949 [Insurance claims filed against Raskob for automobile accidents involving cars insured under his policies with Aetna] ; 35 items
File
15 Ahuja, Elias, 1905-1939 [Correspondence with the DuPont Company's Chilean representative Elias Ahuja. Includes accounts of Raskob and PSdP's 1905 trip to Valparaiso; Raskob family news; correspondence concerning Ahuja's foreign vacation with John Raskob Jr.; seasonal greetings and Ahuja's congratulations on Raskob's business and family accomplishments] ; 125 items
File
16 Ainsworth Manufacturing Corporation, 1929 [Correspondence concerning purchase of shares; financial reports and stock analyst reports; stock syndicate agreements; correspondence between participants in the Checker Cab Co. syndicate] ; 90 items
File
17 Akers, Matt L. & Frank G., 1920-1931 [Requests for meetings] ; 7 items
File
18 Alavoine & Co., 1928-1929 [Bills for imported lamps] ; 2 items
File
19 Alberti, Albert A., 1916-1925 [Invitations to Metropolitan Life Insurance Company officers' functions] ; 5 items
File
20 Albertoni, Mary, 1943-1950 [Letters from companion of Raskob's cousin Mrs. Joseph [?] Shomers, mostly requests for loans and acknowledgements of Raskob's responses and gifts] ; 50 items
File
21 Albright, Horace, 1937 [Advice on destinations for trip to Western US from former superintendent of Yellowstone National Park] ; 3 items
File
22 Alderman, Edwin A., 1925-1931 [Advice to the President of the University of Virginia regarding purchase of stock in DuPont and General Motors; proposal to elicit PSdP's interest in founding a school of social sciences at the University; investment advice to Alderman's widow] ; 13 items
File
1006 Alexander Hamilton Institute, 1913-1929 [Correspondence concerning courses and publications offered by management training organization] ; 14 items
File
25 Alexander Publishing Co., 1934-1935 [Solicitation for subscription to the Alexander Tax Letter'] ; 5 items
File
23 Alexander, James A., 1914-1920 [Invitations to functions and congratulations on appointments from the President of New York's National Bank of Commerce] ; 6 items
File
24 Alexander, Richard, 1934-1935 [Solicitation of interest in automobile technology, with account of Los Angeles social function attended by Raskob and Alexander] ; 3 items
File
26 Alleghany Corporation, 1929-1944 [Receipts for stock purchases and notices to stockholders in the Alleghany Corporation, a holding company for railroad securities organized by O.P. and M.J. Van Sweringen] ; 13 items
File
27 Allemann, Louis and Theresa, 1917-1949 [Correspondence with wife of the Wilmington Playhouse's former manager. Mostly responses to requests for loans and investment advice] ; 15 items
File
28 Allen, C. Loomis, 1901 [Correspondence with former co-worker from Lorain, OH] ; 3 items
File
29 Allen, F.D. and Maude Chapin, 1922-1923 [Correspondence with acquaintances, concerning their relocation to California, and F.D. Allen's employment prospects] ; 5 items
File
30 Allen, Frederick Hobbes, 1930-1935 [Copy of letter from Allen to Governor Roosevelt concerning economic and political situation in Germany; proposals for income tax savings strategy] ; 4 items
File
31 Allen, Henry T., 1930-1935 [General Allen's congratulations on Raskob's work for the Democratic Party; investment advice, including Raskob's summary of his 1928 investment strategy] ; 4 items
File
32 Allen, Margaret, 1912-1937 [Correspondence with widow of Robert Allen (see file 34). Mostly seasonal greetings and accounts of Allen children's health and education, acknowledgements of payments received from trust established by Raskob on Robert Allen's death in 1919. Also includes trust agreements and supplements, and correspondence with Wilmington Trust Company concerning managements of fund] ; 74 items
File
33 Allen, Raymond H. (Mrs.), 1929 [Requests for meetings] ; 2 items
File
34 Allen, Robert, 1900-1918 [Correspondence with friend from Lockport, NY. Includes discussion of work with Johnson Company, the Dallas Consolidated Electrical Street Railway Co., and other business endeavors by PSdP; Raskob's move to Wilmington, DE, and accounts of his family and household] ; 43 items
File
35 Allied Power and Light Corporation, 1930-1935 [Annual reports, notices of stockholders meetings, notices of share offerings, and other shareholder correspondence] ; 10 items
File
36 Alloway, Harry, 1924-1931 [Dunning letters to Alloway, staff member of the Wall Street Journal] ; 14 items
File
37 Altman, B. & Co., 1911-1950 [Bills for interior decoration products and services, with related correspondence] ; 35 items
File
38 American Academy of Political and Social Science, 1909-1930 [Notices of membership dues for Philadelphia organization; receipts for publications; notifications and programs of addresses by politicians, diplomats and scholars on topics including foreign relations, social reform, and philanthropy] ; 35 items
File
39 American Anthropological Society, 1927-1929 [Receipts for purchases of erotic literature published by the Society] ; 3 items
File
40 American Arbitration Association, 1927-1940 [Notifications concerning Raskob's founding membership; summaries of discussions at meetings; invitations to Association events and meetings] ; 15 items
File
41 American Association for Labor Legislation, 1930-1935 [Letters supporting lobbying in favor of Senator Wagner's unemployment prevention and surveying legislation and Roosevelt's social security legislation; announcements and programs for meetings; correspondence concerning membership] ; 20 items
File
42 American Banker's Association, 1909-1920 [Programs and publications from the American Banker's Association's 1909 and 1910 conferences] ; 15 items
File
43 American Blue-Book of Biography, 1922-1928 [Solicitations from biographical encyclopedia] ; 5 items
File
44 American Cigarette Tobacco Corporation, 1925-1936 [Share offer to tobacco farmers and other investors; correspondence concerning corporate organization and financing] ; 10 items
File
45 American Economic Association, 1911-1917 [Correspondence concerning membership dues] ; 7 items
File
46 American Economic Foundation, 1948-1949 [Publications and memoranda from organization promoting simplified education in economics] ; 8 items
File
47 American Exchange National Bank, 1909-1931 [Cover letters and receipts for deposits to one of Raskob's first business accounts; correspondence concerning payments on notes and loans used for stock purchases; bank publications and business reviews, newsletters and memos; statements and check stubs] ; 1,000 items
File
48 American Express Co., 1917-1948 [Receipts and correspondence concerning insurance of goods shipped from Europe] ; 19 items
File
49 American Federation of Investors, 1937-1941 [Publications of Chicago-based anti-tax group; acknowledgements of donations] ; 10 items
File
50 American Federation of Labor, 1928-1930 [Arrangements for meeting; copies of publications] ; 3 items
File
51 American Forestry Association, 1921-1948 [Solicitations for membership] ; 10 items
File
52 American Foundation, Inc., 1925-1935 [Correspondence from organization promoting U.S. membership in international World Court, including publication Foreign Relations Bulletin] ; 15 items
File
53 American Graphophone Company, 1916-1918 [Correspondence concerning investments in company; 1916 auditors report; notices of share offers] ; 51 items
File
54 American Industrial Chemical Company, 1924 [Correspondence concerning the unauthorized use of Raskob's name in incorporation documents] ; 9 items
File
55 American Institute for Economic Research, 1939 [Bulletins announcing publications by Institute on current economic and political events] ; 15 items
File
56 American Insurance Union, 1920 [Application for reinstatement of insurance policy] ; 1 item
File
57 American International Corporation, 1927-1934 [Records relating to Raskob's service as director of investment company. Includes annual reports, auditors reports, and correspondence concerning investment prospects in Europe, employee profit-sharing plans, and dividends] ; 90 items
File
58 American Irish Historical Society, 1930-1948 [Solicitations for donations] ; 3 items
File
59 American Laundry Machine Company, 1917-1936 [Receipt and acknowledgment for payment for washing machine] ; 6 items
File
60 American Legion, 1920-1949 [Solicitations for donations; announcements and invitations] ; 18 items
File
61 American Liberty League: Correspondence, 1934 [Includes correspondence concerning drafts of League charter and statement of purpose; list of supporters and pledges; executive committee reports on League organization and budget, media and public relations strategy. July 1934 folder includes correspondence between Raskob, Jouett Shouse and Alfred Sloan, concerning naming of the League and establishment of principles and objectives, and reports on solicitations of potential members. August 1934 folder includes invitations to League fundraising meetings and responses; report of conferences with leaders of industrial groups, concerning recruitment of supporters and financial support. December folder includes minutes of Executive Committee meeting, considering the restatement of the aims and purposes of the League; correspondence between Raskob and E.F. Hutton concerning proposals to appoint Al Smith as Chairman of the Executive Committee]
File
61 American Liberty League: Correspondence, 1935 [Includes correspondence with J. Howard Pew and PSdP concerning organizational problems and philosophical differences between members of the Executive Committee; attempts to secure pledges from several underwriters, including Walter Chrysler; correspondence with Rauol Desvernines concerning the investigation by the League's National Lawyers Committee into the constitutionality of the National Labor Relations Act]
File
61 American Liberty League: Correspondence, 1936 [Includes folder of correspondence with Hooven Letters, Inc., regarding distribution of fundraising letter written by Raskob, production matters and invoices; responses to fundraising letter, including many hostile and sarcastic letters and complaints regarding the source of addresses; responses to Al Smith's address to the Washington dinner of the Liberty League; summaries of contributions raised through letter; April 1936 updates on fulfillment of loan agreements; correspondence concerning organizing for the 1936 presidential election and support for anti-New-Deal candidates; October letter by Raoul Desvernines to Sinclair Lewis, responding to Lewis' allegations of Liberty League fascism]
File
61 American Liberty League: Correspondence, 1937-1941 [Correspondence concerning wrapping-up of League financial affairs and deposit of its records at the Library of Congress]
File
61 American Liberty League: Publicity [Pamphlets, bulletins, news releases and press clippings concerning Liberty League proposals and activities. Includes mostly complete run of Bulletin of the American Liberty League, August 1935-February 1938; miscellaneous form letters and lists of members and meeting attendees; drafts and transcripts of Raskob's remarks before the National Business Conference, October 1935; pamphlets by the American Federation of Investors; National Lawyers Committee of the American Liberty League report on the constitutionality of the Potato Act of 1935; press clippings, including editorials on liberty league activities and reviews of Governor Smith's speech to the Washington dinner of the League, January 1936]
File
62 American Linen Fiber Company, 1911-1924 [Records relating to performance of investment syndicate and activities of Company, including solicitations for development of flax products suitable for use in automobile tires] ; 80 items
File
63 American Manufacturers Export Association, 1928 [Invitation to directorship of Association] ; 3 items
File
64 American Museum of Natural History, 1928-1938 [Solicitations for membership, newsletters and invitations to museum events] ; 15 items
File
65 American National Petroleum Company, 1922-1923 [Receipts for purchase of stock; reports on test drillings and geological surveys] ; 9 items
File
66 American Nitrogen Company, Ltd., 1917-1918 [Notices of shareholders meetings] ; 3 items
File
67 American Olympic Committee, 1932-1936 [Correspondence concerning Raskob's appointment as treasurer of Committee; publications of national committees; letters from potential sponsors and donors; position of Committee on boycott of Munich Olympics as proposed by American Jewish organizations] ; 8 items
File
68 American Peace Society, 1927-1929 [Solicitations for membership and invitations to events] ; 7 items
File
69 American Red Cross, 1916-1940 [Acknowledgements for donations to fundraising campaigns for relief of U.S. soldiers and European refugees] ; 20 items
File
70 American Shipping Company, 1927-1928 [Receipts for imported glassware] ; 7 items
File
71 American Surety Company of New York, 1918-1933 [Receipts for purchases of shares in insurance company; shareholder correspondence and notices of meetings; financial reports; correspondence regarding appointment to board of trustees, with reports to trustees on Company finances and business operations] ; 110 items
File
72 American Taxpayers League, 1926-1938 [Bulletins and reports from tax reform and repeal movement. Most reports concern efforts to influence income, inheritance and corporate tax regulatory activities of states' legislatures and the federal government] ; 75 items
File
73 American Vacuum Cleaner Company, 1908 [Receipts for purchase of vacuum cleaner] ; 9 items
File
74 American Veterans Association, 1931-1935 [Requests for donations] ; 6 items
File
75 American Woman's Realty Corporation, 1927-1945 [Correspondence concerning Raskob's investment in fund for the construction of club premises for the American Woman's Association, a national women's business organization] ; 25 items
File
76 Anaconda Copper Mining Company, 1930-1942 [Receipts for purchases of shares, notices to stockholders, notices of dividends and annual reports] ; 25 items
File
77 Anders, Carl and Beatrice, 1937-1940 [Correspondence with friends of Raskob family in Niagara Falls, NY. Includes responses to requests for investment advice and acknowledgment of cash gifts] ; 6 items
File
78 Anders, Howard S., 1922-1927 [Request for loan and correspondence concerning repayments] ; 14 items
File
83 Anderson Galleries, 1933-1935 [Cover letters for auction catalogs and notices of sales] ; 3 items
File
79 Anderson, C. Edgar, 1930-1931 [Correspondence concerning Anderson's investments in Warner Brothers] ; 12 items
File
80 Anderson, C. Monroe, 1930 [Request for loan] ; 4 items
File
81 Anderson, Emily, 1936-1937 [Requests for letters of recommendation] ; 4 items
File
82 Anderson, Lois (Mrs. John Anderson), 1937-1938 [Correspondence concerning development of oil business ventures] ; 3 items
File
84 Andrews, Thomas C., 1930-1948 [Advice on improving popularity of Al Smith in southern states] ; 2 items
File
85 Antero Mining Company, 1907-1909 [Notices to stockholders and receipts for purchases of shares; geological surveys and reports on development of mine] ; 13 items
File
86 Anti-Saloon League of Michigan, 1928 [Copies of letter to R.N. Holsaple, Superintendant of the League, discussing Raskob's opinion on temperance and the reasons behind his support for the anti-Prohibition movement, particularly relating to respect for law and the threat of Bolshevism] ; 4 items
File
87 Apartment (120 East End Ave., NYC), 1928-1941 [Rental and lease agreements between Raskob and Vincent Astor; inventories of furnishings moved from Archmere to NY apartment; correspondence concerning purchase and importation of furnishings and antiques; inventory of furnishings, fixtures and antiques, with dates of purchase and source of acquisition; receipts for rental payments, gifts to building employees, and repairs] ; 50 items
File
88 Apartment (Carlton House, NYC), 1919-1931 [Correspondence and other records related to the joint rental of New York apartment by Raskob and PSdP; receipts for rent, furnishings, antiques and paintings, and services associated with apartment, as well as business expenses and social functions; account balances from Ritz-Carlton restaurant and hotel for rent, meal and other services, 1920-1922] ; 100 items
File
89 Appleton & Co., 1907-1912 [Announcements of publications and invoices for purchases, including Catholic Encyclopedia and Great Masters of the Louvre] ; 25 items
File
91 Applications, 1905-1950 [Applications for employment in Raskob's businesses and households, and requests for recommendations and referrals for positions in DuPont and General Motors, four boxes organized alphabetically. Includes some letters from acquaintances, former employees, and Lockport and Wilmington residents. Letters include form-letter denials and referrals, and date mostly from the mid-thirties] ; 1,120 items
File
92 Archmere Academy, 1937-1938 [General correspondence re. donations and school matters] ; 13 items
File
93 Archmere, Inc. (Supplemental) [17 oversize ledger books, minute books, and other bound volumes. Includes cash and expenses journals, 1916-1933; Archmere, Inc. minute books 1916-1935, 1936-1944 and 1944-1949; general ledgers, 1934-1949; stock certificate books; 1913 appraisal and inventory of contents of Raskob residence]
File
93 Archmere, Inc.: Accounts Payable [Ledger sheets, 1918-1942, detailing payments for household operating expenses, household payroll, and other expenses] ; Box 1 of 27
File
93 Archmere, Inc.: Accounts Receivable [Bills and notes of amounts due to Archmere, Inc., 1916-1931, for payments for personal and household purchases; furnishings; landscaping and construction expenses for the new Archmere residence; livestock and produce sales; children's expenses and allowances. Also includes 1949 analysis of notes and accounts receivable from Helena Springer Raskob and the Raskob children] ; Box 2 of 27
File
93 Archmere, Inc.: Annual Reports [Corporate annual reports for 1917 and 1921-1928 filed with the State of Delaware. Reports include summaries of investment totals and share valuations] ; Box 3 of 27
File
93 Archmere, Inc.: Assets and Liabilities [Financial reports and ledger pages, 1917-1947. Includes payments for construction and landscaping at Archmere; domestic expenses for domestic operations; statements of cash and hand and income from dividends and stock sales. Later statements include income and expenses related to notes and loans paid to various family members] ; Box 3-4 of 27
File
93 Archmere, Inc.: Budget Sheets [Annual budgets for domestic operations, including maintenance of Archmere mechanical plant, repairs to rental and tenant housing at Archmere; garden and livestock supplies; domestic expenditures including servant's wages, household supplies and food] ; Box 4 of 27
File
93 Archmere, Inc.: Cash Forecasts [Forecasts for cash on hand, investment income, and tax and household expenses] ; Box 4 of 27
File
93 Archmere, Inc.: Contracts and Agreements [Contracts and agreements between Archmere, Inc. and Raskob family members concerning establishment of holding company and its financial operations; agreements between Archmere, Inc. and contractors working on the Raskob family residence; agreements and correspondence concerning facilities maintenance, including the Welte-Mignon Studios, related to the installation of pipe organ at Archmere; rental agreements and leases; agreements between companies, state and county agencies and Archmere concerning access to utilities and easements. Also includes memo describing organization and functions of household staff at Archmere] ; Box 4 of 27
File
93 Archmere, Inc.: Correspondence [Correspondence with Archmere, Inc., arranged chronologically. Includes negotiations and arrangements with contractors involved in construction of the Archmere residence; balance sheets for the Christiana Securities Company sent to Archmere, Inc. as shareholder; receipts and payments on notes between Raskob and Archmere, Inc. and for stock sales and purchases; 1917 memo concerning valuation of residence for insurance purposes; concerning repairs and rental to tenant housing and other properties; concerning payments into the employee savings fund; concerning Raskob's investment in the Tallahassee Pecan Company; 1939 correspondence concerning loans of Christiana Securities stock to Raskob to be used as a surety bond in the tax-evasion complaint by the U.S. government; concerning sale of Empire State Inc. stocks by Archmere, Inc.; concerning settlement of family loans prior to the dissolution of Archmere, Inc] ; Box 5 of 27
File
93 Archmere, Inc.: Employee Investment & Savings Fund [Records of employee accounts with the Archmere, Inc. employee savings and investment fund, including correspondence with employees concerning payments and withdrawals; memoranda and financial reports concerning investments and operations of the fund; fund balances and ledgers for individual employees] ; Box 6-9 of 27
File
93 Archmere, Inc.: General Subject Files [Folders of correspondence and memoranda on various topics, arranged alphabetically by folder title. Topics include landscaping, construction and facilities maintenance at Archmere and tenant housing, including powder and dynamite orders from the DuPont Company, bills for plantings and landscaping by Lewis & Vanentine, and correspondence concerning electrification of Archmere with Garrett, Miller & Co.; statements of accounts with Bankers Trust Company, Francis I. du Pont & Co., Burnet & Co. and others, with receipts for stock purchases, sales and loans; receipts for purchases of books from Butler & Co.; concerning Archmere, Inc.'s investments in various Raskob family business enterprises, including Chemurgic Industries, Inc.; concerning the planned dissolution of Archmere, Inc. in 1949, and proposals for the liquidation of Archmere Inc., and Pioneer Point Farms, Inc.; dividends paid to shareholders and dividends received by Archmere through its investments; undated inventory of furnishings at Archmere; financial statements, reports from various companies, and receipts for share purchases by Archmere, Inc., from companies including Warner Brothers, Inc., and Kennecott Copper Co.; receipts from the Philadelphia National Bank and related correspondence] ; Box 10-12 of 27
File
93 Archmere, Inc.: Income Tax Papers [Records related to preparation of income taxes for Archmere Inc., tax returns and related correspondence. Also includes assessments and receipts for payment of county and state taxes; correspondence with the U.S. Treasury concerning protests of assessments, with related court filings and financial statements; correspondence with John Raskob Jr. concerning valuation of Archmere's investments in Loughrey Systems, Inc., and engineering consultant's evaluations of Loughrey technology; correspondence and minutes of meetings concerned with the winding-up of Archmere's aircraft manufacturing division and the sale of its assets to General Aircraft Corporation] ; Box 13-14 of 27
File
93 Archmere, Inc.: Operating Expense Statements [Monthly summaries of expenditures, arranged chronologically, including domestic employees' wages; landscaping and construction expenses; household expenses and maintenance. kitchen and laundry supplies. Includes lists of employees in various categories and occupations] ; Box 15 of 27
File
93 Archmere, Inc.: Payroll Sheets [Monthly payroll records for Archmere, Inc. employees, including corporate staff, domestic and estate staff, 1917-1924] ; Box 16 of 27
File
93 Archmere, Inc.: Residence-Acquisition of Property [Correspondence concerning negotiations for purchase of lots and properties in Claymont further to the planned construction of the Archmere residence, including the main property and adjoining lots purchased to protect rights-of-way and views. Includes correspondence with the Pennsylvania Railroad, concerning planned improvements to railroad rights-of-way crossing the Raskob properties; legal opinion concerning blocking plans to construct a steelworks in Claymont, and other correspondence with William and Edward Worth, the Pennsylvania Railroad and others, concerning construction of industrial facilities in Claymont; correspondence and blueprints concerning improvements and alterations to rights-of-way on Myrtle Avenue and installation of water and sewage systems in Claymont; correspondence concerning conveyancing, surveyors reports; maps blueprints and related material] ; Box 17 of 27
File
93 Archmere, Inc.: Residence-Building Specifications & Contracts [Construction specifications, bonds and agreements between Raskob, the architectural company McClure & Harper, and various contractors and bidders, including pricing, completion schedule and descriptions of work to be completed during construction of Archmere residence. Separate agreements for various aspects of the construction including exterior stonework, plumbing and plumbing fixtures, HVAC, patio skylight, roofing, tiling, decorative carving and marble work, kitchen equipment, and elevators] ; Box 17-18 of 27
File
93 Archmere, Inc.: Residence-Correspondence, General [Folders of correspondence on particular topics or with specific contractors working on construction of the Raskob residence at Archmere, with amendments to specifications and agreements, correspondence regarding billing, billing disputes, and punch lists. Correspondents include the American Bridge Company; the American Car & Foundry Company; Henry Keck, concerning the stained glass skylight at Archmere; Lloyd Emory, concerning construction of a river-wall and wharf; C.C. Hendricksen, concerning billing disputes over roofing; Realty Construction Co.; E.R. Schollenberger, mostly bills for plumbing and heating work; M. Welte & Sons and Welte-Mignon Corporation, concerning installation of organ at Archmere, with lists of available music and description of organ stops in the Welte Philharmonic Pipe Organ] ; Box 19 of 27
File
93 Archmere, Inc.: Residence-Correspondence, McClure & Harper [Correspondence with architects McClure & Harper, arranged chronologically, 1916-1919. Includes special orders and revisions to specifications and agreements with contractors; miscellaneous contractors' bills and expense claims. 37 B&W prints of the Woodsedge residence and construction progress at Archmere, and 17 glass plate negatives showing interiors and views of Archmere, were transferred to the Audiovisual Collections and Digital Initiatives Department] ; Box 20 of 27
File
93 Archmere, Inc.: Residence-Correspondence, Vitale [Correspondence between Raskob and landscape architect Feruccio Vitale, concerning Vitale's work at Archmere. Includes initial report and proposals from Vitale, 1916; orders for plants, equipment and professional services; bills and expense claims; correspondence concerning selection and maintenance of plantings and trees at Archmere] ; Box 21 of 27
File
93 Archmere, Inc.: Residence-Payroll [Payroll reports for workers engaged in landscaping and construction work at Archmere] ; Box 21 of 27
File
93 Archmere, Inc.: Residence - Plans and Blueprints [Plans and blueprints showing various aspects of design and construction of the Raskob residence at Archmere, the garage, and various other site features. Detailed inventory of blueprints is available in the HML archives department] ; 24 oversize rolls
File
93 Archmere, Inc.: Residence-Superintendant's Daily Reports [Daily reports, April 1916-November 1917, on construction activities and progress on various aspects of work at Archmere, submitted to McClure & Harper, includes weather and temperature reports and counts of contractors' employees on-site] ; Box 22 of 27
File
93 Archmere, Inc.: Residence-Vouchers [Invoices, receipts for payments and related correspondence for construction services, equipment and supplies. Arranged alphabetically by vendor] ; Box 23 of 27
File
93 Archmere, Inc.: Sale of Archmere Property [Includes correspondence with concerning Raskob's proposals to finance construction of a new home for the Monastery of the Visitation, a Wilmington, DE religious order, including proposals by the Academy to purchase and adapt the Archmere residence for this use; correspondence from realtors concerning parties interested in purchasing Archmere, including several religious orders, a naval preparatory school, sanitarium; arrangements with Wisconsin's St. Norbert College and the Premonstratensian Fathers for financing of the purchase of Archmere and the establishment of the Archmere Academy Catholic school] ; Box 24 of 27
File
93 Archmere, Inc.: Subsidiary Company [Records related to the operations and finances of the Massachusetts subsidiary of Archmere, Inc. concerned with developing and manufacturing a simplified private airplane for leisure and business use, headed by Raskob's son-in-law Joseph T. Geuting, Jr. Folders include requests for draft board deferments for employees of subsidiary and related companies; correspondence with accountants, Patterson & Ridgway and with insurers John C. Paige & Co.; payroll records; bills of sale and other agreements concerning aircraft, equipment and tools; correspondence concerning Raskob's investment in the venture and progress reports; State of Massachusetts tax matters; correspondence and agreements concerning liquidation of subsidiary. Other related records in file 889: General Aircraft Corporation] ; Box 25 of 27
File
93 Archmere, Inc.: Trial Balances, 1934-1948 [ledger sheets] ; Box 26 of 27
File
93 Archmere, Inc.: Vouchers [Bills, receipts and other expenses for general supplies and repairs, legal services and professional services, corporate, real estate and other taxes, and other expenses of Archmere, Inc] ; 27 of 27
File
94 Ardis, John T., 1925-1938 [Correspondence with former General Motors employee] ; 2 items
File
95 Arizona Comstock Corporation, 1935 [Letters concerning estimates of investments needed to start production at gold and silver mine; estimates of production capacity and summaries of operations; summaries of the operational and financial history of the corporation and its properties; correspondence between Raskob and John Raskob Jr. concerning proposed investments in the Corporation and other mining interests] ; 10 items
File
97 Armstong, Lady Margaret, 1930-1941 [Solicitations for donations to various Catholic charities] ; 11 items
File
96 Armstrong, Charlotte, 1917-1932 [Correspondence concerning application for employment] ; 7 items
File
98 Army and Navy Club of America, 1921-1928 [Correspondence concerning offers of membership in New York club, with Raskob's letters declining, and list of founder and life members] ; 9 items
File
99 Army Ordnance Association, 1920-1941 [Membership notices and renewals; announcements and schedules of meetings and events; publications and pamphlets concerning Association's goals and interests in issues of industrial war-readiness and promoting peacetime military production] ; 40 items
File
100 Art Club of Philadelphia, 1910-1931 [Correspondence concerning orders for books] ; 40 items
File
101 Associated Charities, Wilmington, 1916-1931 [Acknowledgments for donations; reports on recipients of funds, mostly Wilmington, DE families requesting temporary financial assistance; notice of organizational name-change to the Family Society] ; 25 items
File
102 Association Against the Prohibition Amendment, 1920-1927 [Includes correspondence 1920-1927 soliciting Raskob's membership, with membership button, members' handbook and list of members from Wilmington; reports on Association lobbying activities and support for 'Wet' candidates in elections, invitations to local meetings, and solicitation for membership in local chapter] ; Box 1 of 3
File
102 Association Against the Prohibition Amendment-1928, 1928 [Folder for 1928 includes Raskob's acceptance of invitation to join Board of Directors; correspondence concerning selection and solicitation of Board members and directors; employment and salary agreement for Henry Curran as president of the Association; Raskob's letter to P. Callaham, May 25, outlining Raskob's reasoning behind his opposition to Prohibition, later published in a pamphlet "Dear Fellow Citizen" with letters to recipients of pamphlet and Association supporters, and other correspondence concerning distribution; summary of opinions of pamphlet recipients; results of statewide Delaware questionnaire on Prohibition, with press release summarizing results; Eastern Shore Declaration, from the 1925 Home Rule Convention for the Eastern Shore of Maryland, opposing the Volstead Act, child labor legislation, and desegregation of education; correspondence with the Constitutional Liberty League; Commissioner of Prohibition's report on enforcement, March 1928, and AAPA Research Department report on Prohibition enforcement; July 16 letter from the Anti-Saloon League of New York concerning allegations of a 'whispering campaign' against the Al Smith candidacy; miscellaneous correspondence with supporters and opponents of Prohibition, including federal and local politicians, organizations and individuals; press clippings and summaries of articles on Prohibition] ; Box 1 of 3
File
102 Association Against the Prohibition Amendment-1929, 1929 [Acknowledgements for contributions; summaries of articles on Prohibition; Moderation League, Inc.: survey of arrests for public drunkenness in major US cities; correspondence between Raskob and the Anti-Saloon League of Michigan; PsDP's proposals on Prohibition; arrangements for meetings with Webster Spates, Senior Attorney for the Bureau of Prohibition; transcript of PSdP's statement before a U.S. Congressional committee; annual report of the U.S. Attorney General on Prohibition enforcement; list of AAPA finance committee members; summaries of lobbying activities, committee proceedings; Constitutional Liberty League publication on Massachusetts's repeal of the 18th amendment, and AAPA correspondence discussing the repeal in MA; December 6 letter discussing organization of 'wet' candidates in Delaware; memoranda on organization of finance and membership departments of the AAPA; list of Democratic Party contributors to the Association] ; Box 1 of 3
File
102 Association Against the Prohibition Amendment-1930, 1930 [Correspondence concerning reorganization of Association and its finances; concerning House Judiciary Committee hearings on repeal; summary of published articles on Prohibition; list of AAPA board of directors and by-laws; correspondence concerning support for political candidates, and lobbying for the proposed 21st amendment and for state repeal; concerning support of candidates in Delaware elections; correspondence concerning Prohibition debate by the Wilmington Waiter's Association, an African-American organization] ; Box 1 of 3
File
102 Association Against the Prohibition Amendment-1931, 1931 [Summary of Prohibition positions of Los Angeles newspapers; correspondence with the Democratic Anti-Prohibition League of California; concerning Democratic party positions on Prohibition in various parts of the country; correspondence concerning impact of Depression on finances and donations; lists of periodicals with articles on Prohibition, press clippings, reports] ; Box 2 of 3
File
102 Association Against the Prohibition Amendment-1932, 1932 [Correspondence with the 'Beer for Prosperity' campaign, and Labor's National Committee for Modification of the Volstead Act; correspondence with state anti-Prohibition organizations; summary of 1932 elections; 1932 financial statements] ; Box 2 of 3
File
102 Association Against the Prohibition Amendment, 1933 [Correspondence concerning ratification of State's constitutional conventions decisions on Prohibition; financial and membership statements; AAPA statements, speeches and press releases concerning Congressional hearings on the 18th amendment and the repeal process in various states; concerning employment opportunities for AAPA employees after the dissolution of the Association] ; Box 2 of 3
File
102 Association Against the Prohibition Amendment-1934-1935, 1934-1935 [Miscellaneous publications and correspondence] ; Box 2 of 3
File
102 Association Against the Prohibition Amendment-Pamphlets [Miscellaneous publications by the AAPA and others on issues of Prohibition and Prohibition enforcement. Includes multiple copies of Raskob's letter 'Dear Fellow Citizen'; anti-Prohibition tract 'Prohibition and the Bible', by George Kilpatrick; membership lists, 1929; September 1933 speech of Jouett Shouse before a Virginia repeal rally; "Dry America;" "Scandals of Prohibition Enforcement;" "Theory of Prohibition" by Stanford Cobb; "Canada Liquor Crossing the Border;" "The Last Outposts of Prohibition in Canada", report on enforcement and bootlegging in Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island; AAPA Annual Reports, 1932 and 1933; Clement Street's "Liberty and the 18th Amendment;" "ABC Plan for True Temperance" by Lewis Rosenstiel; Repeal Associates Inc. pamphlet "Hitler is in Favor!;" C.Y. McMullen's "The Truth About National Prohibition;" flyer for debate at the Wilmington Waiter's Association, participants including Louis A. Redding and other African-American leaders in Wilmington; New York Times for March 20, 1932, front-page article on Prohibition after the defeat of the Beck-Linthicum amendment] ; Box 3 of 3
File
102 Association Against the Prohibition Amendment, 1920-1938 [Correspondence of organization working for the repeal of the Volstead Act, arranged chronologically. Two boxes contain correspondence with organization, of which Raskob was a member 1920-1927, and director 1928-1934 , organized chronologically, and a third box contains pamphlets published by the Association] ; 800 items
File
104 Atlantic City Steel Pier Company, 1929-1945 [Brochures and newsletters for New Jersey tourist attraction and exhibition center. Includes illustrations of 1929 General Motors exhibition at the Pier] ; 5 items
File
105 Atlas Powder Company, 1915-1927 [Annual Statements for 1925 and 1926 and shareholder notices concerning payment of dividends, warrant issues, and amendments to certificate of incorporation] ; 7 items
File
106 Atwater, James & Son, 1901 [Correspondence concerning rental and sale of Jakob Raskob's property in Lockport, NY] ; 27 items
File
107 Austin, Chellis A., 1919-1925 [Correspondence with president of the Mercantile Trust and Deposit Company, NY. Includes invitations to meetings and dinners, and requests for investment advice concerning General Motors] ; 31 items
File
108 Austin, Harry A. and Gladys, 1917-1937 [Correspondence concerning the construction and operation of the General Motors Building in Detroit, including comparative operating revenues and expenses. Also includes discussion of reorganization at General Motors and Austin's forced resignation] ; 44 items
File
109 Austin, Herbert, 1925-1938 [Correspondence with the founder of Britain's Austin Motor Company, concerning visit by John J. Raskob Jr., and sympathy on the death of Bill Raskob] ; 6 items
File
111 Automobile Club of America, 1910-1950 [Announcements and newsletters; notices of dues and receipts] ; 28 items
File
112 Automobile Club of Delaware County, 1912-1913 [Notices from club concerning speed traps and other traffic law enforcement activities in Pennsylvania and New Jersey] ; 5 items
File
113 Automobile Sales Corp., 1916-1918 [Correspondence with Cadillac dealership concerning sale and delivery of new automobiles] ; 23 items
File
114 Automobiles, 1901-1950 [Miscellaneous correspondence, catalogs, application for gasoline rations, insurance and title applications, and other automobile-related matters. Includes lists of automobiles at Pioneer Point Farms, summons for traffic violations and reports of accidents] ; 50 items
File
110 Auto-Strop Razor Company, 1908-1910 [Orders for razor and blades] ; 7 items
File
115 'B' Correspondents: Single Letters, 1904-1950 [Alphabetical file of single letters from various individuals, organizations and companies. Topics include business offers, personal and domestic issues, household purchases and improvements, requests for employment and financial assistance, and political opinions. Includes letter from Gutzon Borglum, enclosing 2 B&W prints and 3 postcards of work in progress on Mount Rushmore, and letter to Bernard Baruch regarding Baruch's opposition to inclusion of Thomas Jefferson on the memorial] ; 210 items
File
116 Babson, Roger W., 1915-1922 [Response to inquiry from president of Babson's Statistical Organization soliciting Raskob's views on the economic impact of the end of World War I] ; 6 items
File
117 Babson's Reports, 1916-1945 [Subscription offers from investment report newsletter] ; 3 items
File
118 Bachrach, Inc., 1932-1934 [Correspondence concerning photograph portraits of Raskob and Raymond Sullivan] ; 5 items
File
119 Backus, Cecil B., 1929-1937 [Request for contribution to Wilmington Boy Scouts] ; 5 items
File
120 Backus, Standish & Lotta, 1916-1925 [Correspondence concerning Raskob's appointment as director of the General Motors Corporation; arrangements for meetings of GM directors; concerning Backus' appointment as president of the Burroughs Adding Machine Company] ; 29 items
File
121 Bacon, Walter, 1917-1946 [Correspondence with resident of Claymont, Delaware concerning local land-use and other issues] ; 18 items
File
123 Bailey, Banks & Biddle Co., 1908-1935 [Orders for stationery and gifts] ; 75 items
File
122 Bailey, H. Clifford, 1920-1930 [Correspondence concerning Raskob's funding of Bailey's enrollment at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and relating Bailey's educational and employment progress] ; 60 items
File
124 Baird, Robert S., 1913 [Cover letter for prospectus of the National Properties Company] ; 3 items
File
125 Baker, Frank, 1917-1919 [Solicitations for orders of New York Times pictorial publications] ; 25 items
File
126 Baker, Frederic W. and Margaret, 1919-1935 [Correspondence with neighbor in Claymont, Delaware, concerning civic improvements and rights-of-way in Claymont, advice on investments, and other matters] ; 21 items
File
127 Baker, George F. Jr., 1918-1936 [Correspondence with the chairman of First National Bank, topics mostly concerning social functions and invitations] ; 25 items
File
128 Baker, James M., 1935-1936 [Acknowledgements of gifts received from the U.S. Ambassador to Siam, and recollections of Raskob's visit to Siam during his world tour of 1935] ; 2 items
File
129 Bald Peak Colony Club, 1939-1940 [Invitations to New Hampshire country club] ; 4 items
File
135 Baldwin Business College, 1948-1950 [Prospectuses for business school founded by Raskob's former teacher Howard Baldwin (see file 131)] ; 10 items
File
130 Baldwin, Eben N., 1913-1917 [Acknowledgements of payments on loan] ; 13 items
File
131 Baldwin, Howard, 1932-1937 [Letters from Raskob's business school teacher, mostly solicitations for Baldwin's proposed business school in Texas] ; 8 items
File
132 Baldwin, James V. and Catherine, 1925-1933 [Correspondence with Chevrolet dealer in Los Angeles, concerning arrangements for vacation to Hawaii, and in appreciation of hospitality to Raskob's family members] ; 14 items
File
133 Baldwin, Joseph Clark III, 1936-1940 [Invitations to functions of the American Committee for the French Exposition in Paris, and the American Design Award Luncheon, from New York assemblyman Baldwin] ; 7 items
File
134 Baldwin, Leroy W., 1914-1938 [Correspondence with the president of the Missouri-Pacific Railroad Company, mostly seasonal greetings and acknowledgements of gifts] ; 35 items
File
136 Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Co., 1909-1942 [Proceedings of stockholders meetings, 1944, 1946 and 1947; Annual Report, 1942; other stockholder communications; routine announcements and correspondence concerning tickets and trips] ; 20 items
File
137 Bamberger, Loeb & Co., 1914-1918 [Correspondence with stockbroker concerning sales and purchases of stocks in various tobacco and mining concerns] ; 100 items
File
138 Bank Miscellany, 1906-1947 [Annual reports and financial statements from various U.S. banks including Brooklyn Trust Company, First Wisconsin Group, the Cleveland Trust Company, Fidelity-Philadelphia Trust Company, New Haven Bank; account books from unidentified accounts, including account used mainly for loans and gifts for college tuition, and other gifts and financial support, 1931-1932; pamphlets and announcements; solicitations for accounts] ; 50 items
File
139 Bank of Lake Placid, 1923 [Records of bank account] ; 3 items
File
140 Bank of New York, 1922-1938 [Announcements and financial statements] ; 10 items
File
141 Bank of the United States, 1929-1932 [Financial statements, announcements; records of purchases of bank stock by Raskob, and correspondence concerning liquidation of company] ; 40 items
File
142 Bankers & Shippers Insurance Co. of New York, 1919-1923 [Announcements of meetings of board of directors] ; 9 items
File
143 Bankers Club of America, 1915-1944 [Club news and announcements, financial statements, and correspondence concerning membership] ; 30 items
File
144 Bankers Trust Company, 1916-1950 [Records of banking and investment accounts with the Bankers Trust Company for Raskob, Helena S. Raskob, Archmere, Inc., Pioneer Point Farm, Radelco Corporation, Regent Corporation, and the Bill Raskob Foundation. Includes account statements, check stub books and canceled checks, deposit slips and other transaction records, mostly complete, for these accounts. Correspondence includes cover letters for deposits and receipts for same; requests for payments related to purchases of stock and participation in County Trust Co. and General Motors syndicates; orders for sale and purchase of General Motors, DuPont Company, and other stocks and securities; transfer of money between accounts and purchase of foreign currency; invitations to meetings; Bankers Trust Co. newsletters, bulletins and publications; recovery of collateral and payments on notes and loans; correspondence with Seward Prosser, Albert Tilney, and other Bankers Trust Co. executives concerning business and social matters, Raskob's election to the board of directors of Bankers Trust, board meetings and other matters. Bulk of material dated 1928-1933, later dates of correspondence include war loan subscription information; wire transfer requests and receipts; annual reports and statements] ; 1,000 items
File
145 Bankhead, John H., 1930-1931 [Political advertisements and correspondence concerning Warner Brothers investments with Democratic senatorial candidate John H. Bankhead] ; 6 items
File
146 Barksdale, Hamilton M., 1909-1917 [Memorandum on proposed employee profit sharing plan at the DuPont Company; acknowledgements of publications received] ; 9 items
File
147 Barnes, Julius H., 1930 [Proposal for General Motors advertising on highway danger 'lighthouses.'] ; 10 items
File
148 Barnett, A.S.E., 1930 [Request for appointment from Alabama state legislature candidate] ; 3 items
File
149 Barr, Lockwood, 1927-1938 [Correspondence with manager of General Motors publicity department] ; 10 items
File
150 Barrett, John M., 1928 [Correspondence concerning purchase of a box at the Metropolitan Opera House in New York City] ; 5 items
File
151 Barrett, William J., 1936-1939 [Invitations to National Recovery Administration alumni events; Union League club questionnaire on current events and political predictions] ; 6 items
File
152 Barron, Clarence W., 1920-1927 [Pamphlets by Wall Street Journal editor Clarence Barron, topics including political and economic outlook; philanthropy; Wall Street Sermons on Prohibition] ; 8 items
File
153 Barry, Homer, 1915-1918 [Orders for stationery] ; 6 items
File
154 Barry, Michael P., 1930-1932 [Acknowledgments of correspondence] ; 8 items
File
155 Barry-Doyle, R., 1924-1931 [Solicitations for donations from New York City clergyman; request for letter of introduction for Adrian Conan Doyle, son of the British author Sir Arthur Conan Doyle] ; 8 items
File
156 Barton, Bruce, 1922-1940 [Solicitations in support of Berea College; correspondence concerning 1932 Democratic Presidential nomination, Barton's 1937 Congressional campaign as a Republican, and in support of Wendell Wilkie for the 1940 Presidential campaign] ; 20 items
File
157 Barton, Joseph C., 1935-1950 [Seasonal greetings and acknowledgments; correspondence concerning mining interests in Mexico] ; 16 items
File
158 Baruch, Bernard, 1928-1950 [Correspondence with the financier and government advisor concerning wagers and financing for local campaigns in the 1928 elections] ; 21 items
File
159 Baruch, Sailing and Leonora, 1929-1931 [Seasonal greetings and general correspondence with Bernard Baruch's brother] ; 17 items
File
160 Bassett, Harry H., 1919-1926 [Correspondence with general manager and VP of the Buick Motor Company. Topics include specifications for the Raskob family omnibus and other automobiles ordered by Raskob; production and profitability figures for 1921; seasonal greetings and general correspondence; business operations of the Wilmington Automobile Company; Bassett's response to Raskob's solicitation to join General Motors] ; 73 items
File
161 Bast Fibers, Inc., 1930-1935 [Memoranda and correspondence concerning operations and finances of Bast Fibers, Inc., a company founded to develop and market innovative flax and other textile processing technology. Helena S. Raskob was the initial investor in Bast, in part due to her interest in flax propagation at Pioneer Point. Raskob took an increasing financial and operational interest in the company until its failure to develop the promised technology and increasing unprofitability led to the liquidation of the company. Records include financial reports and bank statements; stock transfer books and certificates; minutes of shareholders and directors meetings; correspondence with company scientists and managers concerning progress in developing new procedures and technologies; correspondence concerning settlement of company debts and winding-up of Bast Fibers; expense reports for Bast employees Allan McQueen and Johannes Kuchenmeister; diary of operations, development and production; tax matters, including memoranda and records detailing tax implications of dissolution of Bast. See also file 201, Billwiller Patent] ; 750 items
File
162 Bath Club, 1930-1940 [Correspondence concerning membership and events at Miami Beach country club] ; 15 items
File
163 Batten, George W., 1916-1919 [Correspondence concerning proposed position for Inez Batten as governess and companion to Helena M. Raskob] ; 10 items
File
164 Battle, George Gordon, 1928-1938 [Correspondence with New York City lawyer and political leader. Topics include financial assistance to Democratic Party organizers; support for the League of Nations; letters of support for the appointment of Harlem Star editor Anthony Ferguson as U.S. Deputy Marshal; concerning proposed boycott of 1936 Berlin Olympics and outline for plan to aid religious refugees from Nazi Germany] ; 30 items
File
165 Baxter, Helen H., 1922 [Invoices for children's dressmaking] ; 4 items
File
166 Bayard, Thomas Francis, 1915-1930 [Correspondence with Delaware lawyer and U.S. senator Thomas Bayard regarding the Caesar Rodney Memorial Association (see also file 1892); Democratic Party organization in Delaware and mobilization of support for the Al Smith ticket, including exchange of correspondence concerning allegations of Bayard's lack of cooperation with State Democratic leaders] ; 24 items
File
167 Bayne, Jasper & Nanette, 1923-1939 [Personal correspondence with friends concerning visits and social occasions] ; 27 items
File
168 Beal, Thomas P., 1923-1928 [Invitation to the Massachusetts Bankers Association annual dinner] ; 4 items
File
169 Beck, James M., 1918-1934 [Solicitation for investment in Welte-Mignon Piano Company] ; 3 items
File
170 Beckley, Pendleton, 1927-1931 [Correspondence with lawyer from Bankers Trust Company's Paris, France office] ; 4 items
File
171 Beckman, Quitman, 1935-1937 [Acknowledgements of Raskob's donations to the Catholic ministry at Princeton University] ; 6 items
File
172 Bedford, Alfred Cotton, 1919-1922 [Correspondence with chairman of Standard Oil, concerning meetings of the International Chamber of Commerce] ; 17 items
File
174 Bee Hive Company, 1906-1922 [Business and financial records of the DuPont Building stationery store, tobacconist and news ageny owned by Raskob and Irénée du Pont. Includes statements of Raskob's account with store and acknowledgements of payments; financial statements and ledger entries; correspondence concerning acquisition of store from McIntyre and Co.; requests for employment references and correspondence with store managers and staff concerning bonuses and profit sharing plan payments] ; 95 items
File
173 Bee, William E., 1919 [Acknowledgment of gift of golf club] ; 3 items
File
175 Beehler, William, 1908 [Orders for umbrellas and umbrella handle catalogs] ; 7 items
File
176 Behrend, Ernst, 1934-1936 [Acknowledgments of gifts and get-well-soon messages] ; 7 items
File
177 Bekeart, Phil, 1904-1936 [Correspondence with sporting-goods merchant and gold-rush historian Philip B. Bekeart of San Francisco. Topics include recollections of visits and accounts of activities of mutual friends; development of Raskob's mining interests] ; 27 items
File
178 Belin, Charles A., 1906-1923 [Correspondence with PSdP's brother in law Charles Belin, concerning the nitrate business in Valparaiso, Chile; impact of the 1908 recession; proposed listing of DuPont Company securities] ; 14 items
File
179 Belin, Ferdinand Lammot and Frances, 1915-1922 [Travel and meeting arrangements, letters of appreciation for visits and gifts, DuPont Company and other business and investment matters] ; 17 items
File
180 Belin, Gaspard d'Andelot Jr., 1917-1930 [Appointments and seasonal greetings] ; 4 items
File
181 Belin, Paul B., 1919-1925 [Solicitations for Bankers' Trust business] ; 5 items
File
182 Bell, William B., 1935-1949 [Correspondence with the President of the American Cyanamid Company. Includes invitations to meetings of the Economists' National Committee on Monetary Policy; acknowledgement of receipt of Brown's pamphlet How to Share the Wealth (copy in file 1644)] ; 6 items
File
183 Belle Mead Pony Farm, 1913 [Catalog of Shetland ponies] ; 5 items
File
184 Bender, William Jr., 1938-1939 [Quotations and anecdotes] ; 2 items
File
185 Bendix, Vincent, 1931-1934 [Social invitations and seasonal greetings; invitation to join the anti-New Deal group, Committee for the Nation (file 455)] ; 4 items
File
186 Benedict, Harry I., 1929-1935 [Arrangements for meeting with boyhood friend from Lockport; request for loan] ; 18 items
File
187 Benitez, Mamerto, 1930 [Correspondence concerning legal troubles of former employee] ; 11 items
File
188 Benjamin, Alfred H., 1929-1932 [Letters from the president of the Alfred Benjamin Import Corporation, a wholesale meat supplier, on various political and economic subjects, with acknowledgements by Raskob. Topics include protectionist tariffs and their effects on employment, and the causes of the Depression] ; 8 items
File
189 Bennett, James Harry, 1930-1935 [Solicitations for Raskob's support of Democratic Party organization in Monmouth County, NY] ; 4 items
File
190 Benson, Alden R., 1922-1924 [Correspondence with Delaware Secretary of State] ; 2 items
File
191 Bent, Jane, 1937 [Letters requesting help in dealing with alleged stock swindle] ; 3 items
File
192 Benton, William B., 1935-1937 [Correspondence with William Benton, of the Benton & Bowles, Inc. advertising agency and vice president of the University of Chicago. Includes requests for meetings to discuss business proposals, and list of radio programs produced by Benton & Bowles] ; 7 items
File
193 Benziger, August and Gertrude, 1924-1949 [General correspondence and seasonal greetings from proprietor of the Grand Hotel, Brunnen, Switzerland] ; 14 items
File
194 Benziger, Marieli and Rita, 1948-1950 [Solicitations for donations from daughters of August Benziger (file 193), founders of the Popes Children for War Relief. Includes reports on activities and newsletters from charity and photostat of letter to the Benzigers from Pope Pius] ; 5 items
File
195 Berger, H.H. and Co., 1910-1913 [Orders for fruit and vegetable seeds and bulbs] ; 4 items
File
196 Bernardini, Philip, 1933-1934 [Correspondence with Archbishop of Sydney, Australia] ; 3 items
File
197 Berry, George L., 1928-1933 [Correspondence with the president of the International Printing Pressmen and Assistants Union of North America, concerning the Smith campaign, Raskob's financial support of the former Secretary of Labor William B. Wilson, and Berry's attempts to enter the beer bottle label printing business] ; 6 items
File
198 Bertrand, Alphonse N., 1928-1929 [Requests for stock advice and employment referrals] ; 7 items
File
199 Bewley, William, 1901-1947 [Correspondence with William Bewley, a friend of Raskobs from Lockport, NY. Topics include Bewley's early business ventures in Lockport and Raskob's support and investments in them; Bewley's political career as New York State Republican assemblyman; visits and vacations with the Bewleys; repayments of loans made by Raskob, investment advice and reports on investments made by Raskob on behalf of Bewley; career with General Motors, particularly concerning promotion of the GM employee savings and investment plan; correspondence concerning the income tax suit against Raskob and PSdP; news and events in Lockport] ; 200 items
File
200 Biechler, E.G., 1931-1935 [Correspondence concerning John Raskob Jr.'s employment with Frigidaire in Dayton, OH] ; 9 items
File
201 Billwiller Patent, 1929-1930 [Correspondence concerning the development and patenting of a process for improved production of yarns from vegetable fibers and for production of cellulose for industrial uses. Includes negotiations for Raskob's purchase of the patents for the process; investigations into the process by Allan McQueen, on behalf of Raskob, and for use by DuPont; investigations into the validity of the patent; bills for legal and other services related to the investigation] ; 250 items
File
202 Binder, Walter J., 1936-1950 [Condolences during Raskob's illness in 1936. See also file 587, Delaware Floor Products, for business correspondence between Raskob and Binder] ; 7 items
File
203 Binger, Walter D., 1921-1930 [Business offers related to civil engineering and construction projects in New York City] ; 8 items
File
204 Bingham, Lois, 1936 [Inquiries and best wishes related to Raskob's 1936 illness and convalescence] ; 4 items
File
205 Bingham, Robert W., 1928-1929 [Correspondence with the editor of the Louisville, KY Courier-Journal and Louisville Times. Arrangements for meetings; analysis of 1928 Presidential campaign] ; 13 items
File
206 Bishop, Arthur G., 1918-1928 [Correspondence with the president of the Genesee County Savings Bank, concerning purchase of Chevrolet stock on behalf of General Motors] ; 24 items
File
207 Bishop's Service, 1919-1926 [Confidential reports on individuals and companies from the Bishop's Service mercantile agency. Reports on Phelps Cree, Robinson, Hall & Co., and the Napon Rayon Co] ; 6 items
File
208 Bissell, George P., 1911-1938 [Receipts from broker for share purchases and sales, mostly Chevrolet Motor Company and General Motors Corporation, and inquiries regarding stocks available for sale in DuPont Company and subsidiaries; correspondence concerning subscription to fund for the purchase of collection of artworks by Howard Pyle] ; 30 items
File
209 Bitting, Clarence R., 1922-1937 [Includes memorandum from Fisher Body Corporation executive concerning plans to place Wills Company into receivership; correspondence concerning promotion of the domestic sugar industry and the sugar industry in Clewiston, Florida] ; 8 items
File
210 Bixby, R.W., Inc., 1920-1938 [Inquiries from executive recruitment company concerning possible placement of clients in Raskob business interests] ; 6 items
File
211 Black, George, 1919-1932 [Invitations to meetings of Wilmington Police associations and boards from the Wilmington chief of police] ; 5 items
File
212 Black, Starr & Frost-Gorham, Inc., 1931-1948 [Sale offers and jewelry catalogs] ; 8 items
File
213 Blackley, Ollie S., 1928 [Offer for sale of violin once belonging to Raskob's father] ; 9 items
File
214 Blasius & Sons, 1906-1908 [Receipts for player piano rolls and repair services] ; 6 items
File
215 Blatz, William C., 1912-1923 [Requests for organizational and financial assistance with building committee of Ursuline Academy; wedding invitation; Raskob's letter of introduction to the Beach Club casino in Palm Beach] ; 15 items
File
216 Blind Brook Club, Inc., 1927-1950 [Notices of membership meetings for Port Chester NY golf club; annual reports; nominations; invitations to club events and golf tournaments] ; 50 items
File
217 Block, David, 1930-1931 [Letters from Atlantic City, NJ merchant expressing support for Raskob's anti-Prohibition position] ; 2 items
File
218 Block, Harold B., 1930-1931 [Requests for advice regarding Warner Brothers investments] ; 7 items
File
219 Block, Paul, 1929-1935 [Acknowledgements for copies of editorials and articles sent to Raskob by the publisher of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Newark Star Eagle, and other Ohio and Minnesota newspapers] ; 19 items
File
220 Boca Raton Club, 1932-1944 [Minutes of membership and directors' meetings; club tariffs, membership lists, and by-laws; building and facilities plan; correspondence concerning reservations and membership fees] ; 30 items
File
221 Boehm, M.S., 1918 [Correspondence concerning purchase of Canadian World War I photography collection] ; 6 items
File
222 Bohne, Thomas S., 1930 [Two photographic prints of Raskob presenting trophy at the Orphan's Race Meeting at Idle Hour Stock Farm, Lexington KY] ; 5 items
File
225 Bond Club of New York, 1920-1938 [Correspondence concerning meetings and publications] ; 20 items
File
223 Bond, Alice, 1927-1929 [Telegrams concerning schedules for meetings and visits] ; 3 items
File
224 Bond, Richard and Rachael, 1929-1940 [Christmas and birthday cards; arrangements for social engagements and visits; inquiries after mutual friends and general family news; concerning Raskob's loans to assist the Bond's son to attend Valley Forge Military Academy and other financial assistance] ; 43 items
File
226 Bongard, R.R., 1936-1949 [Acknowledgment of gifts and arrangement for meeting] ; 3 items
File
227 Bonschur and, 1922-1936 [Orders for spectacles for Robert Pierre Raskob and Elizabeth Holmes Raskob; invoices for repair of Raskob's glasses] ; 15 items
File
228 Bonwit Teller & Co., 1920-1924 [Invoices for ladieswear and lingerie; inquiries concerning account and charges] ; 20 items
File
229 Book of the Month Club, 1927-1932 [Subscription and account information, catalogues and notices of sales] ; 8 items
File
230 Books, 1901-1949 [Publishers catalogues, orders for trade, rare and limited edition books, and correspondence with publishers. Includes encyclopedias, religious works, self-help and business-related titles, and historical topics, questionnaires for biographical works and vanity publications] ; 75 items
File
231 Bordeaux, James A., 1929 [Letters in support of Raskob's position on Prohibition] ; 3 items
File
232 Boren, Wallace, 1935-1936 [Layouts and drafts of anti-tax advertisements with receipts and expenses submitted by Boren, of the J. Walter Thompson Company, a leading advertising agency. Includes records related to the development of 'tax-axe' logo for proposed Tax Reduction League] ; 100 items
File
233 Bornemann, Rudolph, 1935 [Crank mail concerning General Motors operations in Germany] ; 4 items
File
234 Borton, Everett E., 1926-1929 [Correspondence with attorney concerning purchase and mortgage of property on West Brandywine Ave., Wilmington] ; 14 items
File
235 Bostick, Harry E., 1934 [Cover letter for photographs from a meeting of the Palm Springs Trap and Skeet Club] ; 3 items
File
236 Boston Travel Society, 1908-1910 [Brochures for round-the-world tours] ; 4 items
File
237 Bowe Carriage Co., 1910-1912 [Invoices for repair of carriage] ; 4 items
File
238 Bowers, Claude G., 1929-1933 [Correspondence with journalist and historian Claude Gernade Bowers, editorial writer of the New York World and trustee of Monticello. Includes recommendation for a Democratic Party-funded purchase of the Indianapolis News, and solicitations for donations to Thomas Jefferson Memorial Foundation] ; 6 items
File
239 Bowes, Edward, 1937-1939 [Acknowledgements of gifts received by Raskob] ; 3 items
File
240 Bowman, John McEntee, 1929-1931 [Appeals from the president of the Biltmore, New York for involvement and donations to groups and causes including the Marshall Stillman Movement, an employment program for ex-prisoners, and testimonial dinners for Sir Thomas Lipton and William Muldoon] ; 9 items
File
241 Bowman, Lynn, 1927-1940 [Correspondence with acquaintance from Lorain, OH, recollecting Raskob's involvement in YMCA activities during his residency there] ; 5 items
File
242 Bowser, S.F. & Co., 1910 [Invoices for installation of oil tank at the Raskob residence] ; 5 items
File
243 Boy Scouts of America, 1916-1939 [Fund raising campaign appeals for Boy Scout troops in Wilmington and the Eastern Shore or Maryland, and acknowledgements of donations] ; 25 items
File
246 Boydston, Tom D., 1929-1936 [Correspondence with Boydston, a Bartelsville, OK accountant. Mostly Raskob's responses to Boydston's business and financial proposals; requests assistance in securing employment; comments on political news. Includes press clippings from the Magazine of Business, June 1929, concerning Raskob's proposal to create investment trusts for working-class men; concerning accusations of stock speculation made against Raskob by Senator Robinson of Indiana] ; 20 items
File
244 Boys Club of Wilmington, 1936-1940 [Fundraising appeals and newsletters] ; 8 items
File
255 Boys Clubs of America, 1936-1937 [Fundraising appeals, newsletters and brochures from Boys Clubs in Philadelphia and New York, including correspondence with J. Howard Pew concerning Boys Club anniversary celebrations] ; 10 items
File
247 Bradbury, Charles L., 1942-1949 [Correspondence with the vice-president of Raskob Mining Interests, Inc] ; 5 items
File
248 Bradford, Taliaferro C., 1908-1940 [Correspondence with Bradford, an automobile dealer, and later, real estate broker. Topics concern purchase and maintenance of vehicle by Raskob; employment references for Bradford and his employees; notices of farm property for sale] ; 40 items
File
249 Bradley, E. Gertrude, 1918-1939 [Correspondence with friend from Lockport (?). Topics concern Bradley's personal finances, including repayments of loans made by Raskob and his advice concerning sale and purchase of stock; payments made by Raskob for household and educational expenses on behalf of Bradley and her family; general family news and inquiries re. Lockport friends and acquaintances; advice on vacation locations and driving routes for vacation trips] ; 100 items
File
250 Bradley, Kate, 1919-1922 [Correspondence with sister of E. Gertrude Bailey (see file 249) concerning purchase and sale of General Motors stock] ; 9 items
File
251 Brady, William A., 1914-1949 [Correspondence with William Brady, head of Wm. A. Brady's Theatrical Enterprises, of New York, and the World Film Corporation, a movie production and distribution company. Topics include management and programming for the Wilmington Playhouse; invitations to plays and sporting events in Wilmington and New York] ; 90 items
File
252 Brahany, Thomas W., 1923-1926 [Correspondence concerning memberships and activities in clubs, including list of guests at Gridiron Club meeting, February 1923] ; 6 items
File
253 Branch, A.J., 1911-1912 [Correspondence concerning employment reference] ; 4 items
File
254 Branch, Herbert C., 1930-1932 [Request for autographed photograph of Raskob, and related correspondence] ; 10 items
File
255 Branham, Adolphus D., 1930 [Correspondence concerning organization of Democratic Party members in St. Louis, MO] ; 8 items
File
256 Brasch, George M., 1930 [Correspondence with wholesale jewelry and watch making company] ; 6 items
File
258 Brazelton, Terrill, 1929 [Correspondence concerning request for a meeting] ; 5 items
File
257 Brazilian Technological Fund, Inc., 1948 [Includes list of guests at reception for the Brazilian ambassador; bulletin concerning opposition to foreign petroleum companies by Brazilian nationalists and communists] ; 6 items
File
259 Breckenridge, Henry and Aida, 1932-1934 [Correspondence concerning Raskob's chairmanship of the DNC; support for Aida Breckenridge's candidacy for membership of New York's Beer Control Board; Colonel Breckenridge's nomination for the U.S. Senate as Constitutional Party candidate] ; 8 items
File
260 Bremer, M. Stephen and Patsy, 1946-1951 [Correspondence between Raskob, his daughter Patsy Virginia, and son-in-law. Topics mostly concern estate, tax and investment matters. See also file 1923, Patsy Virginia Raskob] ; 40 items
File
261 Brentano's Inc., 1919-1949 [Invoices and receipts for books and periodicals ordered by Raskob for gifts and personal use] ; 10 items
File
262 Breslin, Joseph A., 1927 [Letters of introduction for Raskob's friends and associates to Monsignor Breslin, of the Collegio Americano del Nord, Rome] ; 4 items
File
263 Brewer, Charles B., 1929-1932 [Correspondence with D.C. area attorney, probably related to DNC matters] ; 6 items
File
264 Brewer, H.K. and Co., 1935-1936 [Orders for business cards and stationery] ; 2 items
File
265 Brian, Guy and Marie, 1948 [Wedding invitation and correspondence with acquaintances] ; 3 items
File
266 Bright, Joseph E., 1929-1933 [Correspondence concerning creation of an endowment for Jesuit colleges in the United States; concerning the national debt] ; 17 items
File
267 Brill & Scott, 1932-1934 [Solicitation from estate counselors concerning Raskob's estate planning] ; 7 items
File
268 British Canadian Asbestos Co., 1908-1910 [Correspondence and agreements concerning participation in business syndicate and the liquidation of the company's assets. Raskob participated in the syndicate with R.R. Carpenter, Irénée du Pont, and William Winder Laird] ; 32 items
File
269 Broadman, Joseph, 1930-1940 [Solicitations for support of the Broadman Library, a collection of publications, clippings and pamphlets related to the Great War and its aftermath] ; 15 items
File
270 Broderick, J.J., 1927-1940 [Correspondence concerning Raskob's financial support for the education of Broderick's children; requests for assistance in finding employment; comments on Raskob's political activities] ; 40 items
File
271 Brookings Institution, 1934-1938 [Invitations to lectures and other events; publication catalogs; arrangements for meetings with Harold Moulton, president of the Brookings Institution, a Washington, D.C. public policy think-tank] ; 14 items
File
272 Brooks, Walter H., 1930-1940 [Proposals for business media ventures, including joint takeover of the Pathe company by DuPont and Warner Brothers, and advertising support for Father Charles Coughlin's radio sermons; 1940 letter alleging Roosevelt administration plan to oppose appropriations for the House Un-American Activities Committee (Dies Committee)] ; 10 items
File
273 Brophy, Arthur J., 1937-1938 [Letters in support of renewed nomination of Al Smith for Democratic presidential candidate] ; 7 items
File
274 Broseco Corp., 1930-1937 [Records related to management and investments of DuPont Company and General Motors executive Donaldson Brown's holding company (see also File 278 and Accession 1334, Donaldson Brown Papers: Series I). Includes lists of securities held; receipts for stock sales and purchases; 1930 plan of reorganization for the General Motors executive investment plan, Managers Securities Company, and related correspondence from Alfred P. Sloan; annual reports for Kennecott Copper Corporation, United States Sugar Corporation, and others] ; 75 items
File
275 Brosseau, A.J., 1926-1936 [Correspondence with the president of Mack Trucks, Inc., mostly arrangements for meetings and congratulatory messages on appointments and announcements] ; 17 items
File
276 Brown, Charles C., 1914-1916 [Invitations to social events; correspondence concerning Brown's recuperation from illness] ; 9 items
File
277 Brown, Edmond Warren, 1930-1936 [Economic proposals and medical advice] ; 5 items
File
278 Brown, Frank Donaldson, 1917-1948 [Includes memoranda concerning DuPont Company and General Motors finances, Finance Committee activities, and stock market performance; 1925 National Credit Office confidential report on Durant Motor Company finances; Raskob's opposition to the proposed new Buick 30 Series; Alfred Sloan's and Brown's responses to Fred Kent's proposed Economic Council for national economic planning; correspondence concerning employee and management shareholding plans; memo and corporate statement on employee relations and collective bargaining] ; 60 items
File
279 Brown, H. Fletcher and Florence, 1916-1935 [Correspondence with DuPont Company vice-president and wife, concerning support for various charitable causes in Wilmington, including services to soldiers, the YWCA, PSdP's school-building program, and the Red Cross; 1921 report on effects of industrial curtailment; report on pension needs of University of Delaware staff, with proposed retirement system and list of University staff] ; 35 items
File
280 Brown, John Draper, 1927-1948 [Invitations and congratulatory messages] ; 3 items
File
281 Brown, Lewis H., 1935-1950 [Correspondence with the president of the Johns Mansville Corporation, an asbestos products company. Topics include proposal of Brown to membership in New York's Metropolitan Club; support for Georgia Democratic congressman Edward Eugene Cox in the 1948 elections and Republican senator Robert A. Taft in 1950] ; 17 items
File
282 Brown, Robert C. and Ada, 1930-1948 [Birthday and Christmas greetings] ; 3 items
File
283 Brown, Walter Stewart, 1909-1913 [Correspondence with the architectural firm of Brown & Whiteside, concerning plans for construction at Archmere] ; 20 items
File
284 Bruce, Howard, 1931-1939 [Invitations to meetings and social engagements by Bruce, business executive, racehorse owner and Democratic Party of Maryland delegate; solicitations of support for candidate to Maryland and Congressional political offices. Also includes transcripts of Bruce's radio debates on unemployment relief and recovery from recession, delivered in NBC's America's Town Meeting of the Air series] ; 10 items
File
285 Bruce, William Cabel, 1929-1931 [Correspondence with former U.S. Senator for Maryland, concerning support for Raskob's chairmanship of the DNC] ; 7 items
File
286 Bruhn, Bruno, 1928-1929 [Forwarded pamphlet on Franco-German relations] ; 4 items
File
287 Brush, Matthew C., 1924-1939 [Correspondence with Brush, president of American International Corporation. Mostly market predictions; congratulatory messages and acknowledgments; Brush's expressions of gratitude for Raskob's financial and investment advice; the effect of opposing political loyalties upon their friendship; invitation to a directorship in W. Averell Harriman's Aviation, Inc.; invitations to participate in syndicates proposed by Sir Harry McGowan, founder of ICI, and to meetings and events with McGowan] ; 100 items
File
288 Bryan, James M., 1909-1911 [Bids for painting Raskob's houses on Bayard and Woodlawn Avenues] ; 5 items
File
289 Brys, Blanche, 1948-1950 [Thank-you letters from employee for Christmas bonuses] ; 2 items
File
290 Buck, M.J., 1930-1934 [Proposal for Prohibition reform and business offer] ; 2 items
File
291 Buck, Walter H., 1931-1932 [Invitations to meetings of the Southern Maryland Society; Baltimore Evening News editorial welcoming the Raskob family as residents of the Eastern Shore; request to solicit Howard Bruce's interest in membership of the Association Against the Prohibition Amendment] ; 10 items
File
292 Buckner, E.G. and Susan, 1911-1926 [Correspondence with DuPont Company executive. Includes account of Buckner's business trips to South America and Europe, with Raskob's summaries of DuPont Company business activities, including the anti-trust suit, construction of the DuPont Hotel and the Playhouse, and other issues; arrangements for purchase of Chevrolet Motor Company shares] ; 18 items
File
293 Buick Motor Co., 1919-1946 [Includes notifications of Buick shipments via various railroad companies; Raskob's specifications, orders and invoices for automobiles] ; 50 items
File
294 Bulkley, Edwin M., 1928 [Invitation to Bankers Trust Company anniversary dinner; legal memorandum concerning the estate of Conrad Hubert, founder of the Eveready Company] ; 4 items
File
295 Bumgardner, Eleanor, 1948-1949 [Request for photograph of Al Smith; news of mutual acquaintances] ; 5 items
File
296 Bumstead, Dale, 1912-1913 [Arrangements for purchase of DuPont Company shares] ; 20 items
File
297 Bunnell, Sterling H., 1901-1924 [Correspondence with former Moxham & Co. employee, includes Raskob's letter of reference on behalf of his brother; membership and organization of the National Security League; solicitations for charitable donations; accounts of business opportunities in post-war Russia, including potential for General Motors exports; orders for purchase of General Motors stock and debentures] ; 65 items
File
298 Burbank, Luther Society, 1912-1914 [Subscriptions to Luther Burbank Society and notifications of publications of Luther Burbank's works on agriculture and horticulture] ; 20 items
File
299 Burgess & Chester, 1907 [Bid for construction work of Bayard Avenue residence] ; 4 items
File
300 Burke, Anthony, 1935-1938 [Notes from Palm Springs acquaintance; recommendations for restaurants and hotels in Europe] ; 6 items
File
301 Burke, Eugene S. Jr., 1926-1939 [Letters of introduction and requests for papal audiences] ; 14 items
File
302 Burnet, W. Everit, 1946-1949 [Correspondence with broker and receipts for sales and purchases of stocks. Invitations to meetings of the Newcomen Society in North America and the Economic Club of New York] ; 9 items
File
303 Burnham, Butler & Co., 1907-1908 [Solicitations and offers from broker for sale and purchase of DuPont Company stocks] ; 21 items
File
304 Burnham, M.E. Roy, 1921-1936 [Requests for loans and other financial assistance, business offers from Burnham, Vice President of the Welte-Mignon Organ Corp] ; 20 items
File
305 Burns, John A., 1930-1931 [Requests for advice on Warner Brothers Co. investments] ; 9 items
File
306 Burroughs Adding Machine Company, 1947 [Service agreements for equipment and receipt for equipment service] ; 5 items
File
307 Burton, Irwin and Maradel, 1933-1950 [Correspondence with family friends from Milford, DE. Includes general family news and arrangements for visits; business matters concerning Burton's Chevrolet dealership; accounts of visits with Raskob and Geuting family members] ; 50 items
File
308 Burton, Wingfield, 1911-1912 [Inquiry concerning available positions with the DuPont Company; Christmas greetings] ; 3 items
File
309 Bushell, Clara M., 1904-1908 [Correspondence with cousin in Buffalo, NY. Topics include investment advice and arrangements for purchase of DuPont Company stock; accounts of visits with Raskob and William F. Raskob; general family news] ; 15 items
File
310 Business Advisory and Planning Council, 1934-1940 [Records of the U.S. Department of Commerce's advisory committee. Includes confidential bulletins, drafts of publications, and position papers on matters affecting the interests of U.S. businessmen, including: industrial relations; trade regulation and policy; unemployment relief and taxation; corporate accounting. Also includes memoranda on meetings, minutes, and attendance records. Raskob served on the council 1934-1935, and served on its executive committee as well as the committee studying the social and economic desirability of decentralization of industry to rural areas of the United States] ; 150 items
File
311 Business Historical Society, 1930-1933 [Invitations to membership, brochure and membership list] ; 2 items
File
312 Business Offers, 1909-1944 [Business proposals, solicitations for investment or participation in various manufacturing, trade, and investment concerns, and other appeals for Raskob's involvement or financial assistance in diverse established and proposed businesses and speculative ventures; real estate, ranching, mining and prospecting proposals, and rural and urban development offers; requests for assistance in procuring contracts with General Motors, DuPont Company, and others; requests for assistance with marketing of inventions; sales of fine art, jewelery, and rare book collections] ; 2,325 items